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Recognising the Dangers

By ATWadmin On November 1st, 2006

Le Figaro, France’s right wing broadsheet, runs an interesting article which, here (in english), warns against anti-americanism. It certainly doesn’t labour over the ‘was it right to go to war’ argument.  Instead it presents some pretty rational arguments centred around the US, in its view, being ‘unsuccessfully bogged down’ in the region as the prescient danger.

"France cannot welcome the destruction of the United States’ deterrent power. The United States is a difficult, sometimes even arrogant, ally, but it is an ally”

“In the absence of a real permanent UN force, the United States is the only permanent Security Council member that has a credible modern army, capable of being dispatched quickly to any part of the world. The problem is that this force no longer really inspires fear”

“Unfortunately for the West – and for world peace as a whole – the United States, by becoming bogged down in Iraq, has destroyed its deterrence power and thus its political credibility. Its advice, demands, and threats are much less heeded than they were even just three years ago”

In referring to the UN the piece ignores this inept and corrupt organisations contribution to world affairs. But overall the piece serves as a timely if somewhat foreboding reminder that the West faces a tough time ahead.

The 21st century promises to be a century of dangerous religious, ethnic, political and economic rivalries, the world needs a global policeman. Until the United Nations has, as its Charter requires, established a military force of its own, the need for such a policeman will continue to make itself felt. And like it or not, this policeman is a US one"

For any mistakes it makes I’d agree that the US needs to be seen as that ‘policeman’, and to act, as the article notes, precisely as that deterrant power. I would argue that the rights and wrongs of the war, most regularly the wrongs, are overindulged by the western media with a singular almost obssessive aim. Often the arguments offer no real solutions, they ignore our duty to the Iraqi people, our own fallen soldiers and promote dangerous consequences for those soldiers still there who are fighting both a physical and a propaganda war

10 Responses to “Recognising the Dangers”

  1. It is refreshing to read that the USA is not the cause of all evil in the world and for this to come from a French source. It has long been obvious that whenever a Republican President is in the White House the global left endeavours to downplay the intelligence of the incumbent – for example just remember the vitriol directed at Ronald Reagan. The same has happened to Bush, who, it must be accepted, is not the most articulate President America has seen. However, he does have a better academic record than Al Gore.

    As to the UN and the thought that it should have its own permanent force. Excuse me for laughing. Who would pay for this force? The USA of course and if they are going to pay for it then they might as well run it – basically the situation as at present. What does surprise me is that, in view of the hassle that the US has to endure, why do they continue to pay the larger, much larger share of the UN’s income?

  2. so what you are saying alison, in essence, is that the world must accept US global dominance. judging by the banners down the left hand side of the new look ATW im guessing you are all happy to become second class citizens for the benefit of the people of the USA.

  3. No thats not what im saying at all. If you read anything i say on the EU you will know I support it – precisely because i see it as a counterweight to US corporate dominance (especially the cultural impact of this), balancing superstates etc. However I do view the US as a force for good overall. And also in terms of its active role as ‘policeman’ – its army as the article states ‘being capable of being dispatched quickly to any part of the world’ – its status as a deterrant power is important..Its part of the West after all!

  4. fair enough alison, i was unaware of your position ala the EU.

  5. DT,

    do you think the world would be a better place if the US had crumbled and the USSR had won the Cold War?

  6. "do you think the world would be a better place if the US had crumbled and the USSR had won the Cold War?"…well said Richard

    or how about world domination by China. DT you really don’t know when you are well off.

    In view of all the opposition if I was President of US might be tempted to say to hell with the lot of you and become isolationist. They can cope without us but am not too sure of the other way round situation.

  7. "do you think the world would be a better place if the US had crumbled and the USSR had won the Cold War?"

    the cold war was in essence a myth. thats not to say the threat of nuclear war was quite real though. the distance between the US and USSR was not so great. while the US was busy romping about the world toppling governments that dared trade with russia, it now turns out that the whole time the USA was the USSRs greatest trading partner. what is presented as national security or pragmatism can generally be exposed as nothing more than economics turned nasty. do some study on cold war intervention, most of the cold war histroy that is presented as ideological is anything but.

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    "or how about world domination by China. DT you really don’t know when you are well off.

    In view of all the opposition if I was President of US might be tempted to say to hell with the lot of you and become isolationist. They can cope without us but am not too sure of the other way round situation."

    its too late maggie. if it happens it happens. imperialism is resource expansionism. china will only head west if they need too. the search for oil may force them to make such a move. you are much more likely to see the chinese red army marching up pall mall than any pathetic islamic rabble. i very much doubt they would expand much beyond the ME and its doubful that the move would have any great ideological element.

    if it does happens, please dont blame me tho.

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    Its interesting that you bring up Russia and China, because it would seem to me that world power is shifting East. and what initially seemed like western victory in the Cold War now looks like defeat. The Dragon has fire in its belly and the Bear is wide awake after 20 years of hibernation. now i certainly dont advocate turning our back on the USA, but i think it is up to them to realise that the game is up. they may have the outward looks of a super-power. but inwardly the look weak, powerless and inneffective. this ties in with another topic. the global economy must now stop being global on US terms and start being global on everyone terms equally.

    a good place to start would be the trading of oil in other currencies.

  8. Europe, it seems, can either try tame the Russian Bear or readdress its current status as America’s poodle.

    It has been America’s poodle since the end of WWII and quite a pampered one at that, sitting snuggly under its security umbrella without footing the bill.

    But America now needs a German shepherd or Rottweiler more than a poodle.

    But why bother with all that trouble if you can remaian a poodle and get into bed with the Russian Bear?

  9. Garfield,

    I think it’s a mistake to try and tame a bear. No matter how well trained it becomes, it remains a bear, and when it gets hungry, its trainer will become its lunch. Better to keep it at a safe distance.

  10. flies in the face for your calls for more open and fair free trade tho.

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