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THE TALIBAN AND THE IRA….

By ATWadmin On June 4th, 2007

Even as the US and UK Governments lavish praise on the terror group the IRA, the international tendrils linking terror become more clear.

Terrorist bomb techniques perfected by IRA engineers and electronics experts have spread to theTaliban in Afghanistan, and the Irish Defence Force’s unique know-how in dealing with the devices is being shared with peace-keeping forces there. A senior Army Ordnance Corps officer has been appointed head of training in bomb-disposal techniques with the 5,000-strong International Security Assistance Force. One of seven Irish soldiers (7) in Afghanistan, he is in charge of training the NATO-led forces and the Afghan National Army and police in dealing with the developing threat of improvised bombs. Devices and bombing techniques almost identical to those used by the Provisional IRA in the North have reached Afghanistan via Al-Qaeda in Iraq who, in turn, learned the same techniques from other Middle Eastern terror groups such as the PLO and Hizbollah who trained with the IRA in Lebanon.  Among the techniques that have already been used in the war-torn region include the "proxy bomb", used to devastating effect in the North in October 1990 when a kidnapped catering worker, Patsy Gillespie, was forced to drive a van bomb to the British Army checkpoint on the Border outside Derry.

 

Terror has gone global and be it in Colombia, Iraq, Afghanistan, Spain, the UK or the Republic of Ireland, these scum are all linked in their depravity

2 Responses to “THE TALIBAN AND THE IRA….”

  1. To George Bush, Tony Blair, Bertie Ahern and Peter Hain, thanks for forcing us into sharing power with global terrorists.

    If it’s good enough for us, surely it’s good enough for you?

  2. Irish Defence Force’s unique know-how in dealing with the devices is being shared with peace-keeping forces there.

    How would the Irish Army know anything about IRA bombs? These generally exploded in the UK. If they have ‘know-how’ I would suggest that it is not ‘unique’, since the British Army probably knows a lot more.