web analytics

“WHAT DOES IT MATTER?”

By Patty On February 1st, 2013

As the adage goes, Democrat political promises are rarely kept. The Obama Administration promised much and has delivered little. Year 5 into this Administration and we get to see just how hard reality bites.

What was promised versus what was delivered:

obama-unemployment

As Hilary Clinton might say, “What does it matter?”

39 Responses to ““WHAT DOES IT MATTER?””

  1. Oh, how they misspeak lie, they are incapable of even remotely telling the truth, it’s not in their character ..

    Of course they lie, it’s thier primary function, it’s what they get paid to do, and they are very very good at it.

    Clinton ‘misspoke’ over Bosnia sniper claims

    http://www.nbcnews.com/id/23789011/ns/politics-decision_08/t/clinton-misspoke-over-bosnia-sniper-claims/

  2. I wonder if the Democrats will say anything when America’s once stellar healthcare industry sucks thanks to ObamaCare.

    I’ll bet they blame the high cost, long waits, lack of providers on the Republicans – saying that if only, if only we had “single provider government-run” healthcare, THEN! it would succeed.

  3. Comment from elsewhere, but it just about sums up the whole lot of them ..

    I don’t think Politicians are “deliberatly stupid”, it’s their natural state.

    And never has this adage rung so true as it does in this day & age of ‘modern day politicians’ ” You know when a politician is lying, their lips move “

  4. Patty, on February 1st, 2013 at 5:53 PM Said:
    I wonder if the Democrats will say anything when America’s once stellar healthcare industry sucks thanks to ObamaCare.

    I personaly don’t belive any of them will give a toss to be honest, they will just move on to the next balls-up.

  5. Harri: I recently was in a conversation where 2 Democrat activists complained about the increasing cost of healthcare and the increasingly long waits for service (one was recently in the hospital for stiches).

    I commented that it was only going to get worse as ObamaCare is put further into place – their response was to blame those who prevented the Dems from passing “the single payer system” where the government pays for everything, rather than private insurers.

    They blame private industry!

    I explained that they should blame the insurance company monopolies – among other things – not private enterprise – and that a “single payer system” would be one huge monopoly without accountability, rather than several small monopolies who are at least accountable to shareholders. A large government monopoly would be noticeably worse than several small private industry monopolies.

    All I got was a blank stare in response.

    Among other things, the Democrats are economic illiterates.

  6. Yet, we have people who live in Canada and Germany here, and they don’t complain about those ” socialist ” health care systems.

    I talk to Swiss people often enough, and they really like their system, which they say works very well.

  7. Well, as a member of the insurance industry, I am not surprised that you leap to its defense.

    Insurance is now a huge racket, in bed with government regulators, racking in profits and delivering little in return for high priced risk reduction.

    it’s one thing to offer risk reduction for a high priced premium that a person can refuse to pay if they want to but now we are obliged to buy it -I hear the cost of the ObamaCare healthcare premium will be averaging $20,000/family/year – outrageous for what will be reduced care.

  8. Three cheers for our NHS. Not perfect (and its failures are remorselessly trumpeted here and in the right-wing British press), but free at the point of use to all and held in high esteem by the British public, despite all the sniping from the Daily Hate.

  9. I was watching The O’Reilly Factor the other night and Bill expressed shock that Obama’s popularity is now at a three year high. “Obama is genuinely popular” said Bill in shock. Says I to the TV: “Yes, I believe he won an election recently.”

  10. Peter — No political party could do away with the NHS; it would be political suicide. That said, the Tories (and their pathetic poodles) are sniping away at it as best they can.

  11. Petr

    Fox-Limbaa is still in shock-denial mode. You’d have to have a heart of stone not to laugh.

  12. Patty

    I am not involved in health insurance other than as a consumer and I am wide open to any and all changes that can lead to a better service for our people.

    The Republicans never had any ideas of significance on this matter, and they effectively squandered a historic chance to influence the issue.

  13. Patty

    You’ve spoken about this issue for five years or so, so you must have studied it a great deal.

    Other than the US pre Obamacare system, which country’s approach do you like the best? Canadian, British, Swiss, French or other?

  14. I think the low-information Obama supporters are in for a shock when they see that they’re on average $100 poorer every month thanks to ObamaCare payments to the government.

  15. Ah, so you have no opinion.

    Only slogans ( ” low information voters ” being this month’s Rush Limbaugh epithet to those who don’t vote his way ), here repeated by low information bloggers.

    Don’t do any homework, don’t be surprised when you get outfoxed by the Dems at every turn. They’re the pits, but they did their homework, and y’all did none.

  16. Democrats are either economic illiterates or, they just don’t care because they believe that if only the right people were in charge – once and for all – then all their utopian dreams would come true.

  17. Patty — You’re great at generalised attacks on Dems and Obamacare, but your failure to answer Phantom’s question makes me suspect you’re merely repeating slogans. I mean, you must have some opinion, given your long interest in the healthcare issue?

  18. Patty is as well informed on healthcare as she is on global warming. She thinks the climate is cooling.

  19. //A large government monopoly would be noticeably worse than several small private industry monopolies.

    All I got was a blank stare in response.

    Among other things, the Democrats are economic illiterates.//

    Patty, I wouldn’t have been surprised at those blank stares if I were you. You see, those people you were talking to were probably aware – as really every American interested in the subject should be – that there will still be competition, still private insurance and NO “government monopoly” under Obamacare.

    Many Americans look to Europe (in pity or admiration) for a comparison, and you can take my word for it that there is also a thriving private insurance business here. Nobody is obliged to go with the state health insurance systems.

    Of course most voluntarily do. For example, my health insurance premiums were increased last year, and I got several insurance brokers to come around and show me their best. A waste of time unfortunately.

    Not one of them was, on the whole, able to match the state system in terms of price-performance, even with my higher rates.
    But much more important than price etc for me was simply peace of mind, especially in view of the amount of bother involved with private insurance, on the one hand, and the brevity of life on the other.
    Certain services are covered for me, but not for the kids, others for the kids too, but only up to a certain age, others were covered up to a certain amount each year, or over that amount if you paid xx much extra; then there were certain discounts for no claims, certain cases when you had to pay in cash in advance; if I needed a service when abroad I’d have to pay, but keep the receipts and they’d pay me back … and a thousand other headaches that I’d sooner leave for someone else.
    With the state insurance I get blanket coverage for myself and the whole family. I can show (and have shown) the same card anywhere in Europe and get free service immediately.

    In the UK it’s the same: plenty of competition, plenty of private insurance providers – but again the British people stay loyal to the NHS. In fact, only about 10 pc of people take out private insurance in the UK, and you can bet your bottom greenback that many of the people complaining about the NHS here also choose it over its private competitors.

    So, I hope that explains those blank stares.

  20. Peter — Whenever I hear the cooling ‘argument’ I just cringe for the person!

  21. I hear the cost of the ObamaCare healthcare premium will be averaging $20,000/family/year – outrageous for what will be reduced care.

    No, that’s incorrect, which is understandable considering the source.

    Here is a much more accurate description of the $20,000 premium cost that’s been punted across the conservative blogosphere today.

    It turns out that the IRS published some final regs related to Obamacare recently, and in an effort to be helpful they provided some worked-out examples that include some assumptions about how much health coverage is likely to cost for various kinds of families. In one example, they assume that a worker can buy coverage for himself for $5,000 and coverage for his entire family of four for $20,000. They then work out the tax implications of all this.

    So is this unusual? Not really. The average cost of healthcare coverage for a family is currently about $16,000, and by 2015 (the base year for the IRS examples) that will probably be around $18,000 or so. And that’s for employer-sponsored plans. Individual plans are generally steeper, so $20,000 isn’t a bad guess. It might be a little high, but not by much. And the family in question will, of course, be eligible for generous subsidies that bring this cost down substantially, thanks to the Affordable Care Act. They won’t actually pay $20,000 per year.

    As to Obama’s broken employment promises, to carp about this issue means one must agree with the underlying premise that government creates jobs. Because that’s exactly how Obama intended to increase employment during his last term. As everyone well knows, the president found himself stymied in his attempts to stimulate job growth by an openly hostile republican congress.

    You should be applauding his record of broken promises, Patty. The GOP won that fundamental difference of opinion.

  22. Good news, the Dow topped 14000 today. The first time since 2007.

  23. Daphne

    The stock markets are rising round the world, fuelled by money-printing by central banks and nothing else. The spigots will have to be turned off soon, and the fools who bought the lie will be wiped out.

    Kyle Bass nails it here

  24. Peter, like I have any serious cash in the game.

    You’re saying this is exactly the same or similar type manipulations as the pre-2007 market spikes?

  25. Daphne

    The markets are always rigged (as an old poker playing friend of mine used to say: “the game’s not straight”).

    Goldmans will always win, at the expense of the small guy who thinks it’s smart to buy Google / Facebook stock, at the top. Because they know when it’s time to bail out and sell to the suckers.

  26. The world is way too complicated for me as it is and this sort of stuff tends to make my head explode. I’ll never get the whole, clear picture or feel even moderately confident in my financial decisions.

  27. I hear you.

    Just do what Jim Cramer says! :)

    Cheers, gotta go.

  28. I’ll never get the whole, clear picture or feel even moderately confident in my financial decisions.

    You and me both! Take the best advice you can trust and be prepared to pay for it, is the best I can suggest. Avoid like he plague anyone offering “free” finacial advice.

  29. “Free” financial advice? You must mean my equally non-rich relatives and friends. :-)

  30. Daphne –

    You’re saying this is exactly the same or similar type manipulations as the pre-2007 market spikes?

    It’s exactly the same phony, manipulated, inflationary boom as before, and it’ll go bust just as before.

    Greenspan blew up the dot.com bubble with his money printing in the 90s. This was the basis of the Clinton economic miravle. When that went bust Greenspan increased the money printing and blew up the housing bubble which went bust in 2007.

    One man was remarkably prescient in predicting what would happen, and he made those predictions some years ago. Bah, it must have been a lucky guess because sofistikayted people snigger and sneer at him.

    How bad is it now? Extremely bad. Not only has the Dow gone high, US real estate bubbles are popping up all over. Prices in some places have gone insane. It’s just another phony, manipulated boom. It’ll go bang again sometime. No predictions when. I don;t think it’ll be in the short term. Bernanke will turn off the money tap when price inflation looks like getting out of control. That’ll be the trigger for recession because it’s always the trigger.

    The money tap gets turned off, interests rates rise, homeowners can’t repay, firms default on loans and lay off employees and the recession is in.

    All that remains is for the Chairman of the Federal Reserve, the Treasury Secretary and other idiots who caused it all along to pontificate on TV about how they’re going to fix everything. Then the cycle starts again.

  31. I have been sorting out my pension and have sold some of a shares ISA to buy more pension. As it turns out the sell date will be today. Since my statement in October the value has increased over 10%. So it may be a lucky fluke that I sold most of them today.

    This is the first time I ever remember not even considering bothering with a cash ISA.
    I think any spare cash I have in the near future will be on home improvements or eating into the mortgage. There doesn’t seem to be much point in saving!

  32. Aileen

    Yes, my fund is well up this year. But I’m hesitating over the annual contribution due soon. Might be better putting it into gold or silver, and I honestly don’t know. It’s a bet whatever I do.

  33. Peter

    I think after home improvements and paying off mortgage , I think I would look at building an ISA of funds with a good prospect of dividends. I would set it to reinvest the dividends for a few years and then set it to pay the dividend. I don’t have the temprament to buy and sell shares. So dividends for income would be better suited to me .

  34. Noel –


    In the UK it’s the same: plenty of competition, plenty of private insurance providers – but again the British people stay loyal to the NHS. In fact, only about 10 pc of people take out private insurance in the UK, and you can bet your bottom greenback that many of the people complaining about the NHS here also choose it over its private competitors.

    So, I hope that explains those blank stares.”

    Yes Noel, I am also reliant on the NHS. But it is not by choice! I can not afford to pay for private treatment or insurance and like everyone else in the UK, I am not allowed the freedom to opt out of the NHS, which would involve tax rebates. Its a bit like not being allowed the freedom to opt out of the BBC.

    However, more generally, whatever system is in place to provide health care, it seems that the main factor compromising the standard of care is the high remuneration demanded by and given to many of those who provide that care.

  35. http://www.nhscareers.nhs.uk/explore-by-career/doctors/pay-for-doctors/

    The salary of an NHS grneral practitioner is £53,781 to £81,158

    http://www.nhscareers.nhs.uk/explore-by-career/nursing/pay-for-nurses/
    There is huge variance in nurses’ pay as there is a huge variance in skills / training for the many types of nursing jobs. The least skilled earn £14,000. A nurse in GP practice earns £27,000, while a health visitor ( who travels to give care? ) earns £40,000

    I don’t think that these rates of pay are high at all,considering the years of training required and the importance of what they do. How much would you wish to pay them?

  36. Phantom
    The figures you quote are very high compared to many highly skilled, qualified and experienced people in the private sector (non medical)who depend on convincing customers to pay them, largely down to luck. But also many salaries are much higher than you quote.

    Maybe you are lucky enough to consider these salaries not high.

  37. I don’t think that you can make any fair comparison between medical and non medical.

    What exact job would you compare to that of an excellent, skilled general practitioner?

    A profession not just a job that one qualifies for after years of medical school, heavy coursework in the sciences, and an apprenticeship after that?

    What to compare to?

  38. Phantom
    Almost forgot to mention silly unsustainable pensions. I don’t think I undervalue the medical profession but I suspect you consider it intrinsically superior to everything else which supports it and allows it to exist. It is not the only profession which has required lengthy study at university followed by further lengthy study and years of work experience. Don’t misunderstand me – I do not single out the medical profession for its greed.

    There are greedy, selfish people in all walks of life, who care about income and career progression more than helping others, but there are also people who help others at the expense of their own selfish interests – many in small private business who are never recognised.

    I happen to have experienced the finances of many trades and professions over my working life and it may surprise you that those in the public sector or private contractors to the public sector are in general the richest I have come across.

  39. which is understandable considering the source.

    Which one- Patty or the other liar?

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.