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DIPPING BANNED…

By David Vance On May 18th, 2013

One of the pleasures of eating out  dipping your bread in some olive oil. However, the EU is moving to stop that little pleasure. Why? Well, it wants to protect us…

They are a staple on restaurant tables across the country, but the EU has decided to ban olive oil jugs in order to ‘protect customers’.  The controversial move means that customers will now only be able dip their bread or garnish their food using oil from non-refillable and labelled bottles. A decision to ban the classic jugs and dipping bowls was made by a little-known Brussels committee earlier this week.

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OK, I can see that there IS a point here that is fair enough. Restaurants can rip customers off by using low grade oils, I suppose, but I can honestly say in all the meals I have had where dipping of bread into olive oil bowls has been part of it, I never recoiled in epicurean horror at the quality of the olive oil dip. Once again the EU shows its natural tendency to BAN things.

9 Responses to “DIPPING BANNED…”

  1. thank god the Eu has saved us. Literally thousands of lives saved. Far betteruse of time than solving the Euro crisis. A great organisation that we should definitely be part of. NOT.

    Whats next savinvg the planet from navel lint?
    UKIP.

  2. They can take my oil drizzler from my fat, greasy hands. Right, so what’s it all about?

    “The controversial move means that customers will now only be able dip their bread or garnish their food using oil from non-refillable and labelled bottles.”

    Stiffing the litle guy is what it’s all about. Stiffing the family pensione and restaranteur who press their own oil. To advantage the industrial-scale producers, proprio is verboten, so we have to have what the industrial producers supply, with fancy labels and all.

    As always now, laws aren’t about what the masses are duped into thinking of them. They ooze out of the bureaucracy because the special interests have paid for those laws, and the result is usually that the small producer or the consumer is being done over.

    Lawmaking is a racket.

  3. I don’t see how this is logically different from only being allowed to serve us food from sealed ready-meal containers.

    Fancy a Birds Eye roast beef differ at the local restaurant on Sunday?

  4. Regulation is important, hyper-regulation is stifling. You actually had people study this problem that didn’t really exist, in order to arrive at a solution that no one needed.

    Bloomberg, don’t you get any ideas.

  5. Sealed Roast Beef dinners now 68% horsemeat free. Yep the Eu saved us from Dobbin meat didn’t it. Tough on the causes of non existent issue’s utterly invisible on real one’s. Well worth billions of our money each year.

  6. Pete Moore

    Yes, it would be interesting to know which agri mega-corps lobbied for this. I imagine that enforcement will be difficult in Italy and elsewhere.

  7. Peter –

    Your little family taverna in the back end of Greece will get away with it, and jolly good luck to them. A restaurant on the Piazza Navona in Rome is a little more visible.

    Given the parlous condition of state finances, it could come down to how zealous local police and bureaucrats are in looting a few more euros from an establishment for placing a drizzling bottle of doom on a table.

    Seeing which labels are on the bottles will be a clue to which corproates bought the law. My very best wishes go to olive oil dissidents everywhere who vill ignore ze order.

  8. There are many very small producers of labeled olive oIl in the world you know. Any really good food store might have dozens of producers to choose from. Spanish, Italian,Greek, American, Australian, from all the lands.

    This is stupid law, which applies a sledgehammer to a nonexistent problem, but everything in the universe does not have to be mangled into a Dr Evil Corporate Conspiracy Fable, complete with Vincent Price hysteical laughter. It is doubtfult that the big Euro corporates knew of this legislation as it wa being crafted. It won’t make a bit of difference to their bottom line. Their share of this market likely will not change at all.

  9. Olive oil is putrid stuff that tastes like evil.

    Anyway what are the Mail complaining about? Isn’t the whole olive oil and bread thing a Euro habit?