web analytics

A REPUBLICAN MERRY XMAS!

By ATWadmin On December 11th, 2006

SinnCard_239586d.jpgI invite ATW readers from outside of Northern Ireland to view the sort of Christmas Card which some Irish Republicans see as a celebration of the season.As you see, they delight in showing Santa with a machine gun. In another sketch, a gun-carrying snowman wears a black IRA-style beret. The Republican Sinn Fein cards are on sale in west Belfast. Calendars for 2007, with chilling photographs of masked gunmen, can also be bought at the outlet. And just in case some IRA sympathiser points out that this is not mainstream Republicanism at work, Sinn Fein’s official 2007 calendar, on sale on its website, marks the 35th anniversary of Bloody Sunday and the 20th anniversary of the killing of eight IRA men in Loughall. The Eight concerned were brought to justice before they could implement the murder spree they had in mind. Naturally Sinn Fein mourn the loss of the IRA associates. Terrorists stick together.

89 Responses to “A REPUBLICAN MERRY XMAS!”

  1. Disgusting but not unexpected.

  2. Looks like it was drawn by a 9 year old.

  3. As a prominent outside reader of these hallowed pages I can say that (1) the artwork of the card is primitive (2) the sentiment seems primitive as well and (3) who cares? Isn’t this a case of calling more attention to a thing than it deserves?

  4. Mahons – SF 2007 Calendar commemorates terrorists who were interrupted trying to kill policemen, when SF HAVE to support the police in order to be included in Government – you don’t see anything of significance here ?

  5. Mad: I have no respect for SF’s need to glorify and/or apologize for terrorism. I just don’t think the card in question or the calendar are significant issues (what is the actual circulation of these things?). There comes a point when you’ve got to separate the irritable and irrelevant from consideration.

  6. What a repulsive artifact. I would hope that such cards are not widespread, either in West Belfast or any other part of it.

  7. I disagree in this respect Mahons – if their calendar shows a disregard for the basic requirements for recognition as a civilised political entity, then there is no place for them in Government. They cannot have it both ways. They are either reformed and supportive of law and order or they are still on the wrong side of the line. this is not something that can be fudged.

  8. Just noticed on another competing Blog 🙂 that the PSNI is to supposedly to head down to Dublin to see about getting some of the 40m that they are short for the building of the PSNI training college,

    Strange one this. Is it merely an attempt to embarrass the UK gov into ponying up the rest of the cash ?

  9. Tom – RSF are quite small, but a lot of the nationalist community are still ambivalent over violence and terrorism, as seen by their support for Sinn Féin.

    SF ARE regrettably mainstream – and it is worth a look at their online store – plenty of glorifcation of terrorism – and I see that for all the attempts by the GAA to distance themselves, Sinn Fein are STILL piggybacking their terrorist past onto the GAA with the advertising of a "GAA Jersey" commemorating the Long Kesh Terrorist Hunger strike.

    it will be interesting to hear if Chris will attempt to justify the abuse of the GAA by his party …..

  10. Mad: I guess what I am saying is that their involvement in printing a calendar for their supporters may not rise to the level of other offenses. I have no understanding of their involvement with the crappy card, but I would also think it to be more of a trivial offense and rather juvenile. I have no idea what other factions do this time of year (Please tell me the Loyalist Calendar doesn’t depict Dr. Paisley as a scantily clad "Mr. December"). I would think that out of the bumps in the road of the peace process that these type of offenses would be among the more trivial.

  11. Kloot – ultimately the Gardai are in such a mess that it is going to be upto the PSNI to try and bring them upto the standards of the Old RUC. So they should put tgheir hands in their pockets!

  12. Mahons – The RSF cards aren’t really more than an irritation. But SF are mainstream. They can no more be allowed to commemorate terrorism and murderous attacks on the police than you would allow the Republican Party in the USA to celebrate Lynchings of black people on their calendar.

  13. >>ultimately the Gardai are in such a mess that it is going to be upto the PSNI to try and bring them upto the standards of the Old RUC.<<

    Mad, the Gardai are indeed well overdue reform, and out minister for justice could take some of pattons suggestions on board in the ROI. A new training centre would be spot on for templemore.

    However, I dont think they are as bad a state as you are making out. They are a very young, well trained and in the majority, honest group of people. An unarmed force who risk their lives targeting modern armed criminals with no respect for the police, nor the state.

    Any particular areas that you think require attention ? In what levels would they not have equaled the standards of the ‘Old RUC’

  14. BTW, ive no problem in the Irish government putting up some money for the development. Its a sign of a maturing relationship between the two forces. Im just not sure how this would go down with Unionism in general. Although, mad, you dont seem to have a problem with it, how do you feel most would feel about it

  15. Mad: I wouldn’t think that the Republicans in the U.S. would even consider such a thing (and actually the Deep South was run by the Democrats in those days). I would note that states in what was once the Confederacy (eleven southern states in the USA, including the Texas of our pal Charles) have monuments, streets and other public structures that glorify the southern cause of the Civil War. Some of these things are more offensive than others, but we seem to be able to get along. For instance I don’t care as much that South Carolina has the Confederate Flag in its state flag as much as I care that black people have equal access to its laws.
    I think you can rightly criticise the SF crowd for glorifying certain terrorists on their calendar, but I am not sure if their preaching to the choir is really rising to the level of other issues you may have with them.

  16. Bunch of yahoos Kloot 😉

    Actually, teasing apart, I’m sure many of them are decent enough – but the various tribunal revelations don’t encourage respect. One of the things I found disquieting about the Kerry Babies affair was that even in the 1980s the Gardai kept lists of loose women and women thought to be being unfaithful to their husbands!

  17. <Q>I wouldn’t think that the Republicans in the U.S. would even consider such a thing</Q>

    Would they be considered fit for Government if they did ? Would any Candidate who endorsed something like that be considered fit to stand ?

    Because we have Adams and McGuinness lauding attempted murderers and commemorating actual murderers .

  18. Indeed mad, some very serious allegations coming out of the tribunals at the moment. And I think they represented the attitude of the time. Hopefully, and I mean hopefully, the newer generation are much more professional in their ways and views. Ive a few connections with the Gardai, my uncle was a senior enough Guard in the cork region, and some of my best mates have gone on to be guards. My mates in particular, represent the new generation of gardai, and Id like to think that the failings of some of the previous generation of gardai, would not be repeated by them. But then, there are always rotten eggs in any organisation, and as long as the system identifies them, then that shouldnt be a problem.

    Gardai are finally being trained to international levels and are getting the equipment and pay that they deserve.

  19. Just to say that I can understand that the more mainstream a political party gets, the more support it usually gathers. Although I don’t view SF as a totally legitimate, peaceful party, I would not write off everyone who votes for them in NI as an outright terror supporter. You’ve only got so many choices as to who to vote for in any system, and many people are probably voting SF perhaps because they see SF as the best way to defeat Unionist parties, or because they hope to see SF cut all ties with the IRA and pursue nationalism peacefully.
    I’m sure that Andrew and probably David too would disagree forcefully with that, and fair do’s, they know far more about NI politics than I do (as does everyone else posting here), so I’m not claiming to speak from knowledge there, just trying my best to see the good in people, that’s all.

  20. Mad: Any candidate endorsing such a thing would be considered a politcal nutjob incapable of obtaining office (and righty so). They wouldn’t be prevented from seeking office.

  21. <Q>incapable of obtaining office </Q>

    How would the USA feel about having them FORCED into office ? Because that’s what’s happening here mate.

    Aye, there’s the rub.

  22. Sad and all as the calendar and other such like items might be on the Sinn/Fein site, did anyone really expect them to change over night from selling this kind of stuff to selling PSNI mugs.

  23. "One of the things I found disquieting about the Kerry Babies affair was that even in the 1980s the Gardai kept lists of loose women and women thought to be being unfaithful to their husbands"

    Have you evidence of this? Sounds interesting.

  24. And no I dont think it right that ANY party seeking government position should be selling such items from their website

  25. Mad: How are they being forced? I thought they were elected.

  26. "even in the 1980s the Gardai kept lists of loose women and women thought to be being unfaithful to their husbands"

    The mind boggles as to the use that could be put to. Invitees to the Christmas party?

  27. I would be particularly interested in names…

  28. "over night" Kloot ?

    They signed up to the Mitchell principles in September 1997!

    Tom – that sort of reasoning could only apply if SF were separate from the IRA. Most of it’s senior figures are convicted terrorists.

  29. >>The mind boggles as to the use that could be put to. Invitees to the Christmas party?<<

    Ha ha 🙂 thats what I was wondering

  30. Tom
    "You’ve only got so many choices as to who to vote for in any system, and many people are probably voting SF perhaps because they see SF as the best way to defeat Unionist parties…..I’m sure that Andrew and probably David too would disagree forcefully with that"

    Ahem!

    no excuse. If defeating unionism is more important than defeating terrrorism then that doesn’t say much for them, to actually vote for them is even worse.

    If my only choice was to vote for a terrorist supporting loyalist or a nationalist totally opposed to terrorism, despite being a committed unionist, I would vote for the latter. I could understand a unionist not voting in those circumstances but I could not understand them voting for the orange version of SF.

  31. <Q>Mad: How are they being forced? I thought they were elected.</Q>

    Elected to membership only.

    They are NOT elected to government.

    So, if a nutjob (like the old unrepentant racist George Wallace ) was somehow supported by enough people to be allowed into Congress or Senate, how would the USA react if it was told it HAD to have him in a senior Government position?

  32. "Mad: How are they being forced? I thought they were elected."

    There is pressure to force them into government.

  33. "I would be particularly interested in names… "

    I wonder what they would get for it on ebay ;o)

  34. Actually Mad poor old Wallace eventually did repent. What I guess I am not understanding about the process over there is are these folks and/or their party elected? Once elected, is there some powersharing agreement that was agreed upon to allow their participation in government? And lastly, isn’t it better today than it was when violence was more prevelant? Remeber keep your friends close and your enemies closer.

  35. Mahons – neo-nazis are getting elected. Should they too be forced into Government?

  36. Not sure many people will take notice of this Christmas card, they’ll still be baffled that Thatcher has taken a leaf out of Dev’s book.

    Answer’s on a post card as to what that is!

  37. Mad: If these folks are getting elected, and there is an agreement in place that allows them to participate in the government, you can hardly keep them out despite their clinging to certain beliefs. I am not as up on the NI electoral process as you but isn’t that the case?
    I don’t know where your neo-Nazis comment is coming from.

  38. Oh yes, Aileen, I do accept what you say above, and I’m not saying that what I wrote represents the way I would decide how to vote. Not at all.
    I’m just trying to get my head inside a part of the Union that has major divisive problems with sectarianism, and to try and understand that for some voters, loyalty to their political~religious creed, and remembrance of past injustices, may make it very difficult for them to step away from that.

  39. Tom I don;t for a minute think that you would as for

    "loyalty to their political~religious creed, and remembrance of past injustices,"

    I have that too, but it would still be no excuse.

  40. Mahons – How do you force a majority to sit in Government with unrepentant terrorists ?

    NB – yes, a process was agreed – SF have not yet met the conditions. They have not lived upto the Mitchell Principles, the IRA has not disarmed fully and SF are both refusing to endorse policing AND glorifying attempted murders of policemen.

    Fit for Government ?
    No way.

  41. Re the Gardai :

    <Q> However, the fact of a baby being stabbed rather than simply abandoned struck deep at the moral core (and no doubt the imagination) of a whole community. To the authorities it represented an affront to common decency, and a scapegoat had to be found.
    She came, as anyone over the age of 30 will remember, in the diminutive figure of Joanne Hayes. A young woman of 25, attractive, intelligent and of an independent mind, Joanne was employed at the local sports centre in Tralee.
    It didn’t take long to point the finger of recrimination at her. The first line of inquiry for the gardai was to investigate all those in the community who were known to have strayed from the traditional standard of sexual behaviour. They compiled a register which encompassed three main groups: women known to be involved in extramarital affairs, single women with children, and members of families in which there were known instances of incest and violence. It was in effect a list of people who were socially and morally marginalised, those who existed beyond the stringent parameters of decent behaviour at the time.
    That such a list was possible speaks volumes about the community in Kerry in the mid-Eighties. It demonstrates that everybody knew exactly what was going on in their communities, but that this knowledge remained largely unspoken. Those issues which were deemed to be deviations from accepted, traditional behaviour were never tackled publicly. Opinion and discussion of such things was driven underground, broached only through rumour exchanged behind closed doors.
    When the police came across Joanne Hayes, they considered they had made a breakthrough. As a single mother who was known to be involved in an affair with a married man, she was certainly eligible for a place on the list of those who were not "respectable". Joanne’s first baby by Jeremiah Locke, a married man who was her colleague at the sports centre, was born in 1983. At that time Joanne was absorbed in her love for Jeremiah, and the strength of her feeling made her bold. Spurred by a romantic optimism that he would leave his wife to be with her, she shrugged off the shameful stigma of her position and was proudly open about the fact that she was carrying his baby. It was a combination of brazenness and naivety, because although she seemed not to care, she was nevertheless regarded as somebody who been touched by scandal. Her family was bothered by this, but eventually came to accept and cherish its new member. </Q>

    http://www.unison.ie/irish_independent/stories.php3?ca=44&si=1097718&issue_id=10208

  42. Mad: I suppose that if the majority voted to allow it, they can hardly be excused from sitting down with them. There had to be some compromise. Unrepentent is better than active.

  43. <Q>I suppose that if the majority voted to allow it, they can hardly be excused from sitting down with them.</Q>

    And when the majority vote against it ?

  44. Freaky stuff there Mad, regarding the Gardai.

    I can only repeat that this kind of attitude would not be tolerated in the ROI of today, and yes there is that much of a difference between the ROI of today and that of 20 odd years ago.

    Sure, if they were to compile a report like that today, they’d never get any work done, it could take em years to complete 🙂

  45. Indeed Kloot – as you say, that’s only 20 years ago ! Reads like something from the 1940s. The hand of John Charles McQuaid had a long reach.

  46. >>ss as you but isn’t that the case?<<

    Mahons, the power-sharing deal is based on the Good Friday Agreement, according to which the dual posts of First and Deputy First Minister and the posts of ministers are allocated to the parties according to their respective strengths in the assembly.
    The Agreement also obliged all parties to make every effort to secure disarmament of all illegal factions.

    The Agreement was passed by an overwhelming majority in both parts of Ireland on the same day, a majority of over 70% in Northern Ireland (with a turnout of over 80%) and over 90% in RoI.

    The Mitchell Principles obliged all parties to exclusively political roles and total renunciation of violence and verifiable disarmament of parliamilitaries.

    Neither the GFA nor the Mitchell Principles obliged any party to recognise the PSNI or join police boards, although it could be argued that that was part of the spirit of both.

    The first power-sharing executive under the GFA met seven years ago.

  47. <Q>The Mitchell Principles obliged all parties to exclusively political roles and total renunciation of violence </Q>

    How does glorifying a murderous attack on a police station count as renunciation of violence ?

  48. Madradin,
    your post says the Gardaí found a murdered baby so their first line of inquiry was to investigate all those in the community who were known to have strayed from the traditional standard of sexual behaviour.

    What would your first line of enquiry have been?

    No names either. I was about to get my hands on a car and head for Kerry.

  49. Agreed, Garfield,

    Like any other police force, the Gardai had formed a profile of the possible killer and were merely matching this against the local population, Common sense. All that talk of lists is humbug.

    That article is typical of the gushings of purple prose feminist writers came out with at the time to portray Joanne as a victimised heroine.
    She had been known to be pregnant and very ashamed of it. But she had no baby to produce for it. So she was obviously the prime suspect, and she was charged only after several of her family had admitted (albeit under strange circumsances) that she had killed her baby. It later emerged that the murdered baby had a different blood group, and Joanne was released immediately. (she had buried her baby in the garden, where it was later found. It had either died by itself there (her story) or she had killed it (some family and the guard’s story)..

    The fact that the media and the Irish public jumped on this story and discussed it at length and with obvious relish at the time was a sure sign that the days of McQuaid were long gone.

  50. There was a time when picking up the gun was justified. It was not two hundred years ago either. Lets face that.

    But if I am to understand anything that has taken place over recent years, all or virtually all have agreed that "the gun" is to have been taken out of Irish politics.

    If that is the consensus of Irish opinion- North and South, Protestant and Catholic, "loyalist" and "nationalist" then I have a very hard time understanding why anyone would produce such a card or buy it, or receive it with anything like approval.

    These images horrify. They don’t represent an Ireland that anyone I know would want to be a part of in any way.

    Those fictional(?) guns won’t be aimed at "the Brits", they’ll be aimed at fellow Irishmen who bump into the wrong guy in a pub, or who talk too much about things transported in the dead of night, or who do not support the national objectives of those holding the guns.

    The producers of these cards must hate Irish children deeply, mutilating their lovely image of Santa Claus into a murderous bloodthirsty criminal.

    The worst possible enemies of a United Ireland are those who produce, buy, sell, or receive these cards with approval. They represent an Ireland that no good person could ever want to be a part of.

    A Happy Christmas to all!

  51. If Sinn Fein do endorse policing it will be a "from this day forward" endorsement of the PNSI.

    It will not be a retrospective endorsement of the RUC and we are going to have to live with the fact that we disagree about the past.

    On a very practical level if mainstream republicans do not commemorate the IRA members killed in the struggle then they will be handing their memory to the people who want the struggle to go on.

  52. Garfield,

    Remember, this "list of loose women" was compiled in the 1980s.

    They mightn’t be the Mae West 20 years down the line! 😉

  53. <Q>If Sinn Fein do endorse policing it will be a "from this day forward" endorsement of the PNSI.</Q>

    if it is wrong to kill PSNI members after SF endorse them , they why was it NOT wrong to kill them before ?
    There’s no way round this – SF WILL be admitting that their campaign of violence was WRONG. Dress it up whatever way you like.

  54. PSNI officers been killed by terrorists?

    When was this, I must have missed that one. I thought the force had never lost a member on duty.

  55. <Q>There was a time when picking up the gun was justified. It was not two hundred years ago either. Lets face that.</Q>

    No let’s NOT "face" that Phantom. There was NEVER a time when it was right launch a terrorist campaign.
    NOTHING justified what was done here by loyalist or republican terrorists or rogue members of the security forces.

    For those who are Roman Catholic – on several occasions your Church has ruled that this was NOT a "Just War".

  56. Don’t try to be a smart arse Garfield. Police men and police women were murdered by the people you venerate.

    Like it or not – when SF say that it’s wrong to kill NOW they are admitting that it was wrong to Kill THEN.

  57. "<Q>There was a time when picking up the gun was justified. It was not two hundred years ago either. Lets face that.</Q>"

    Lets face it properly then Phantom. What murders are you justifying?

  58. Who do I venerate Madradin? I hope you are not making up things again.

    I find it hard to venerate myself sometimes, never mind anyone else.

    To closest I’ve ever come to veneration is …. no point, you don’t know her.

  59. Incidentally – 2 more dead bodies found in Dublin.

    How many Murders is that this year ?

  60. MR

    The only people besides yourself who see no difference between the PNSI and the RUC are the guys who produced the Card at the top of this page.

    We are nearly there on policing but and resolution it will be about the future not the past.

  61. "Incidentally – 2 more dead bodies found in Dublin.

    How many Murders is that this year ?"

    Frankly, one is too many. Anyway, why are you asking? I’m sure you gleefully keep count!

  62. Mad, Sad news alright, but is there a point behind highlighting it ?

  63. No Henry. You are wrong. "We" are not "nearly there" on Policing. Decent people are ALREADY HERE on policing. It’s the terrorists and their supporters and apologists who have to move.

    Your (plural) Hypocrisy is sickening. If it’s about the future the past has to be cleared up – as you and yours demand in respect of perceived injustices against terrorists.

  64. Kloot – it raises all sorts of issues – who the heck are people like Cunningham and Henry to be thumbing their noses at NI when their own wretched country is littered with bodies and their police a laughing stock ?

  65. MR

    Decent people are ALREADY HERE on policing.

    Are they the same decent people that vote UUP? The people who thought the RUC was just fine and dandy and there was no need to change as much as their cap-badge?

    Where ye are on policing is where ye were dragged.

  66. >>who the heck are people like Cunningham and Henry to be thumbing their noses at NI when their own wretched country is littered with bodies and their police a laughing stock ?<<

    I dont see how a murder in Dublin makes the Gardai a laughing stock. They cant prevent murders, they can only solve the crimes, and the gardai have pretty high detection rates.

    To follow that logic, are the police in East Anglica would be a laughing stock because of the 3 murders.

    Dublin, like any other european capital has crime. No shock there.

  67. We have taken a retorgrade step on policing, where it discimination on the ground of religion is hard wired in to the recrutment process.

    Those most betrayed by what happened to the RUC are those RC RUC officers who were murdered or injured.

  68. Disgusting and depressing that people would do this and be allowed into government.

  69. Alison,
    the people who did "this" probably hate Gerry Adams more than you do because he wants to go into government.

  70. Did you know that the IRA and Hamas consult with one another? I didn’t until today. There is a very disturbing video of an interview with
    Ahmed Yousef of Palestine discussining his meetings in Ireland with the IRA!

  71. oops..I got so upset thinking about this that I forgot to link:

    http://www.memritv.org/search.asp?ACT=S9&P1=1336

  72. NotMe

    I thought IRA have connections with a lot of terrorist organisations across the world. Dont provide cross training on weapons and other such things

  73. <Q>I dont see how a murder in Dublin makes the Gardai a laughing stock</Q>

    Eh ? Where did I say that the Gardai were a laughing stock BECAUSE of these murders?

    Point I’m making is that provo apologists should put their own house in order and all those who think that the ROI is a model for NI to follow should have a look at the problems the ROI is trying to deal with at the moment – and failing miserably.

    3 dead bodies – not two – a woman has been found dead in a field in Clare.

  74. Kloot: obviously they do. I’m naive, I guess. I hate to see it spelled out so clearly – and so shamelessly – as Ahmed Yousef does in this interview. I think of terrorists as clandestine – not as legitimate.

  75. >>Eh ? Where did I say that the Gardai were a laughing stock BECAUSE of these murders?<<

    Cheers mad, I just re read your comment, and I see where i misread you. I read it as you insinuating that the Gardai were a laughing stock because of these murders, but you were actually saying they were a laughing stock full stop!!! Much more clear.

    Can you not just counter their arguments.. your almost sinking to name calling levels here.

    Nobody puts the ROI up as a role model for ANYTHING other then its economic policies. We have a crap transport system, an under funded education system, a bloated civil service, an overly strong Union influence, a 3rd rate health service and the list continues…

  76. Kloot – so why would NI want to link up with the ROI ?
    And shouldn’t people from the ROI devote their energy into sorting their OWN country out?
    It’s almost as if ROI politicians are using NI to try and divert attention from domestic issues 😉

  77. Mad

    I think that Kloot is happy enough for us to stay where we are ;o)

  78. Mad,

    Very good question. And no simple answer. Yes, there is a lot wrong in the ROI, but alot of this comes down to massive under investment down through the years. The money simply wasnt there. Bit by bit things are changing. Weve already had one national development plan and another is on the way.

    Transport is finally getting money put into it. The Luas is a classic example, a metro is due in the next 5 years, New stock has been purchased and is now in use across the country. A new terminal will shortly begin in Dublin airport.

    Something like 30 odd schools were announced for the dublin area alone just recently ( wouldnt think there was an election on the way would you ). A new childrens hospital is soon to begin.

    Yes, there is alot wrong, but slowly but surely progress is being made to bring us out of the dark ages. It really is a vibrant place to be at the moment, while still frustrating while the country is literally being rebuilt. Give us 10 years and ask me again.

    As to why NI would want to join up with the ROI. I cant answer that. I can only surmise. I think it would have to come down to NI seeing a better more secure, less instable future with the ROI in some NEW entity, then its current status which is currently always questioned by one section of its community. NI would want to see that its community could thrive while at the same time be secure with its identity. I duno. Again, im just pulling straws here.

    As for ROI politicians trying to divert attention from their problems at home. Well that could be the case except for the fact that the general public in the ROI, those 40 and under, pay no attention to the north. Too busy checking bank balances and buying houses. I dont mean that they wouldnt want to see a UI, most people would tick the yes box on this, provided that there would be no instability and that it wasnt going to cost a fortune. Alot of people in the ROI see a UI through rose tinted glasses, by not paying attention, they dont really get the minutiae of the goings on in NI. My opinion on this would be that it would be great to see Unionism in NI, engaging with the public in the ROI more, with a view to getting the Unionist viewpoint across. I think that jeffrey donaldson and a few other unionist politicians are trying on this front, but more could be done.

    The voting public are only too aware of the problems that exist in the ROI, the problem is there is no decent alternative to vote in, doesnt stop them complaining about the current crop thats in though.

    Aileen, personally, I would aspire that the 2 peoples of this Ireland could agree to some common entity under which they could operate. With respect for both traditions and the common history being maintained. But ive no intention of forcing this on anyone. That would be pointless and extremely unfair. Heck, id be chuffed if cordial relations of a normal type broke out between the two peoples such that both could co exist without threatening each other. Id like to see Unionist politicians comfortable attending public functions in the ROI and vice versa.

    Anyway, thats my long reply over 🙂

  79. Do I win an award for longest post ever…or at least longest waffle post ever 🙂

  80. Kloot

    You’ve along way to go to earn that acolade. Even I don’t qualify. There is someone though. He hasn’t been on for a hile and you may not have encountered him.

  81. You’re missing me aileen?

    my mum’s in intensive care 🙁

  82. Best of wishes to your mum Sir Percy.

  83. Thanks Kloot much appreciated.

  84. I was referring to Felix.

    I am not likely to miss an IRA supporter.

    I am sorry about your mother. Mother’s are special people. I hope you hear better news of her

    The people you admire murdered mine.

    I do not expect to have any further reason to address you. It is extremely distateful to do so.

  85. Aileen

    I guessed you were referring to our Felix. Where is he? I miss him .

  86. Colm

    I don’t know! I’m sure you had him last :o)

    Or was it Monica?

  87. Aileen

    I might have taken a nibble, but I’m sure Monica would have gobbled him up 🙂

  88. Colm

    Dangerous talk my friend ;o)

  89. just seen Lindy’s article about it

    http://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/columnists/lindy-mcdowell/article2070307.ece