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School lunch search party

By Mike Cunningham On July 2nd, 2015

aschoollunchsearchparty

“But. my young friend,  what makes us even more suspicious is the fact that you carried not only two cooked ham sandwiches with mayonnaise, but also a crab salad; both rich in unhealthy super-saturated fats and items forbidden under the new Healthy eating regimes!

 

32 Responses to “School lunch search party”

  1. The rise of the Puritans.

    Nope, no slippery slope indeed.

    The ‘Thought Police’ are coming after the children now.

    Children who say homosexuality is ‘wrong’ could be viewed as extremist threat – Education Secretary

    Anti-gay comments could ‘trigger a thought’ in teachers’ minds about possible radicalisation says Nicky Morgan as she outlines anti-terror plans

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/religion/11709442/Children-who-say-homosexuality-is-wrong-could-be-viewed-as-extremist-threat-Education-Secretary.html

  2. State approved food only to be consumed by state approved children.

    What a wonderful world we have become.

  3. ‘Schools have common law powers to search pupils, with their consent, for items’

    Yeah, that’ll be the Nazis right enough.

  4. Paul McMahon, on July 2nd, 2015 at 12:00 PM Said:
    ‘Schools have common law powers to search pupils, with their consent, for items’

    Any child who has the guts to say ‘no’ will have his card marked.

  5. Any child who has the guts to say ‘no’ will have his card marked.

    No question about it.

    You get ten times more done by means of education, and positive reinforcement than with you do with threats, and searches, and criticisms.

    With their consent my ass. An adult teacher with all the authority and power is asking for consent. Sure.

  6. I wonder if Nigel Farage knows that it was Himmler who first thought of the ‘People’s Army’ when he was promoted to C-in-C in 1944.
    But you have to admit, those Nazis had some pretty natty uniforms..

  7. Cards marked?

    Nah, soon they will just have their chips adjusted if this bell-end is anything to go by.

    A boy of 15 has carried out a DIY operation to insert a microchip into his hand that can control his mobile phone and unlock doors.

    Byron Wake inserted the tiny “transponder” using a hypodermic needle in his bedroom without telling his parents after ordering it online from the US.

    The chip is the size of a grain of rice and can be read by Android devices.

    The chip emits a signal triggering pre-programmed actions and is encased in bio-safe glass similar to chips used to identify pets.

    Despite the instructions recommending the help of a registered nurse or doctor, the teenager carried out the procedure himself.

    http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/technology-science/technology/teenager-inserts-microchip-hand-operate-5971362

  8. An adult teacher with all the authority and power

    What authority and power?

    The biggest threat hanging over school children is detention, suspension and ultimately expulsion. Many school kids see these as badges of honour.

  9. I am sure that’s true – it was always so I think – but surely there must be some school kids who are not smirking little hoodlums.

  10. The thing that kept us in line at school was the threat of getting the shit kicked out of us and while I’m not advocating a return to that and suggesting a tiny minority of school kids are smirking little hoodlums the eternal question remains:

    How do teachers retain authority in classrooms over kids who don’t want to be there?

  11. Harri, on July 2nd, 2015 at 1:19 PM Said:

    A boy of 15 has carried out a DIY operation to insert a microchip into his hand that can control his mobile phone and unlock doors.

    That’s a good idea. An implanted RFID device means you won’t have a wallet to get stolen of keys to lose. And police searches would be a doddle with a hand scanner. I though many on here would support easy identification of illegals.

    Coincidently, I’m working on an application using RFID at the moment. Interesting stuff, I don’t usually get the chance to play with the electronics side.

  12. That’s a good idea. An implanted RFID device means you won’t have a wallet to get stolen of keys to lose. And police searches would be a doddle with a hand scanner. I though many on here would support easy identification of illegals.

    This sounds very much like the old chestnut “Nothing to hide, nothing to fear” mantra.

    Who say’s if we have nothing to hide?

  13. Jesus H Christ, what chance have the rest of humanity got.

    A procedure that takes only seconds to carry out has turned the Jacobs family into medical pioneers, reports CBS News Correspondent Bobbi Harley.

    They are the first people to get “chipped” — implanted with a tiny device called a VeriChip that emits radio frequencies. The chip is a personal ID that also contains vital medical information.

    Jeff and Leslie Jacobs, along with their 14-year-old son, Derek, had the tiny chips implanted in their arms. Each chip is about the size of a grain of rice, and insertion takes about a minute under local anesthesia.

    “It’s great what it can do, it can save a lot of lives, including my dad’s because he has a lot of medical problems and I want him to be around for a while,” said Derek Jacobs.
    http://www.cbsnews.com/news/fla-family-takes-computer-chip-trip/

    Still, if all fails, think of the cheeeldren.

  14. Regardless of what the teachers and admins do, the major problem in our countries is that many parents are a disgrace.

    Not so long ago, the parents would back up the schoolteacher’s authority. Today, very often not so at all. Little Johnny is a ** victim and the teacher is a monster in the event of any dispute.

    This is very much a western thing BTW. I’ve spoken to primary schoolteachers in this area who tell me that all their discipline problems come from the black, white and latin kids – that there are nearly zero discipline problems from a kid from a Chinese, Indian or other Asian family. If the kid acts up in school, he’d have more to worry about from the mother and father than he would from the teacher. The problem is in the home, not the school.

  15. Harri, on July 2nd, 2015 at 2:35 PM Said:

    This sounds very much like the old chestnut “Nothing to hide, nothing to fear” mantra.

    Who say’s if we have nothing to hide?

    True. But it will happen at some stage in our future. I predict RFID will be increasingly used in phones and cards and for more than just security and purchasing goods. Later people will be given the option of implantable chips serving the same function.

  16. Quite a lot of what is wrong with society has parental responsibility, or lack of it, at its core. It’s not the only factor but it is a major one.

    Discipline problems come from the black, white and latin kids – that there are nearly zero discipline problems from a kid from a Chinese, Indian or other Asian family. If the kid acts up in school, he’d have more to worry about from the mother and father than he would from the teacher. The problem is in the home, not the school.

    Jesus Phantom, don’t be saying that around here :=D

  17. As the very great man Father Flanagan said

    “There are no bad boys. There is only bad environment, bad training, bad example, bad thinking.”

    “When parents fail to do their job, when they allow their children to run the streets and keep bad company, when they fail to provide them with good examples in the home, then the parents and not the children are delinquent.”

    http://www.boystown.org/about/father-flanagan/father-flanagan-quotes

  18. What do state nannies know about health and nutrition? Forty years of state propaganda on diet has just been exposed as dangerous, illness-inducing woo.

    How do teachers retain authority in classrooms over kids who don’t want to be there?

    Children (mainly boys) don’t want to be there because schools are unnatural, feminist environments for them.

    The designs are feminised, the rules are feminised, the curriculum is feminised and the staff are increasingly female. There’s hardly anything in school for boys.

    Let me give you a little example. Without exception schools will upbraid a boy who runs in a building. This is unnatural, and so is the institution which puts an energy-packed boy into a situation where he will be punished for doing what is the most natural thing for boys.

    The history of humanity obviously shows that making boys sit still for long periods is unnatural, but that’s what they’re expected to do for most of the day and they’ll be punished if they don’t do it.

    Increasingly of course, for repeat offenders, powerful drugs are pumped into their brains to make them behave normally, when all along they want to behave normally but are prevented from doing so.

  19. The designs are feminised, the rules are feminised, the curriculum is feminised and the staff are increasingly female. There’s hardly anything in school for boys

    Mine wasn’t. I went to a Christian Brothers all male very macho primary & secondary school.

    So what happened with you Pete? Did you capitulate to the great feminist brain wash?

  20. Paul McMahon –

    Fortunately I went to quite un-PC RC schools, though they were far from perfect. No crappy state comprehensive feminism and commie eco-babble for me.

  21. Yep, I feel your pain.

  22. Pete Moore certainly hits the right target in his last but one comment.
    (The whole of society has been feminised, politics especially so).

    I went to co-ed convent schools back in the 50’s, but they had the wisdom to employ tough, secular, all-male teachers for the main core subjects while the nuns oversaw the arts, domestic & religious classes.
    It worked very well.

    Everything is reversed now, and what a dreadful mess.

    (why are there so many Catholics on this blog?)

  23. There are more Retired Catholics than Catholics I think.

    I went to Catholic school too!

    The sisters and brothers who taught us were often tough as nails. They worked under impossible conditions, and helped civilize some of us little barbarians by methods that most certainly included corporal punishment.

  24. “There are no bad boys. There is only bad environment, bad training, bad example, bad thinking.”

    He could have been talking about Westminster.

  25. There’s truth in that.

    I’d think that some go into politics with the best of intentions, only to be dragged into a dirty system. Before you know, they’ve become Tony Blair or Hillary Clinton.

  26. I agree Phantom, the system sucks them in, and corrupts their minds.

  27. “Retired Catholics”, Phantom?

    I must remember that one when I occasionally miss Mass on Sundays….”I’m semi-retired”.

  28. Tony Blair and his dreadful wife are Catholics, that’s all I need to know.

  29. I’m sure they’re great ” cafeteria Catholics ” who pick and choose what they believe in and what rules they follow.

    One from Column A, one from Column B, like at a Chinese restaurant.

  30. Is it just me, or did junior not use the same line?

    The prime minister told ITV1’s Parkinson chat show: “If you believe in God” he decided to invade Iraq because he was on a “mission from God”.

    Anti-war campaigners have criticised Tony Blair after he suggested his decision to go to war in Iraq would ultimately be judged by God.
    The prime minister told ITV1’s Parkinson chat show: “If you believe in God (the judgement) is made by God.”

    Reg Keys, whose son was killed in Iraq, said Mr Blair was “using God as a get-out for total strategic failure” and his comments were “abhorrent”

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk_politics/4773124.stm

  31. Being a ‘Cafeteria Catholic’ or ‘Picky Protestant’ or ‘Middling Muslim’ is the best most logical and sensible position for any thinking independent person to be. Why should it be considered better to follow every mantra of a particular faith as laid down by other people rather than live your own chosen path of spiritual and moral choice so long as you harm no-one else.

  32. As to the topic – Good on the schoolteachers. When in school obey the rules. Simple.