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Not a step: but instead a Leap!

By Mike Cunningham On July 21st, 2015

Death. Its a topic which no-one wishes to touch, with or without a  bargepole, either from a viewpoint of the natural progression of the human condition, or of the nature and bent of certain people who take it upon themselves to state that the Law, as it stands, and has stood for many years, is inadequate to the needs of the ‘needy’. I ought to mention, at this point, a belief which has stood me in good stead for many years, and it is the plain and simple belief that ‘It takes an awful lot  to undo the ‘good’ which do-gooders do’!

The simple truth that is evident to most, which is that we are all going to die; and there is no escape from that simple and yet brutal fact, seems to be beyond the grasp of those who would meddle in the affairs of others. I have lost a great many members of my wider family to the Grim Reaper, but it is not something which I fear. Death comes to us all, but many of those near to the dying one seem to be taken by surprise. We read of the so-called tragedy of a pain-filled death, but we always read at second-hand, as it were. We read of the attempts to change or alter the Law in Britain when a man such as Tony Nicklinson tried, and after he failed; he took the road less travelled, refused food in order to legally starve himself to death, and died from pneumonia. The road to Dignitas is not too busy these days, but there is a steady trickle of people who wish to avail themselves of the deadly drug cocktail which is ‘dispensed’ by the ghouls in that Swiss clinic.

The latest push is from a Private Member’s Bill which has had its First Reading in the Commons, and it is labelled  Assisted Dying (No. 2) Bill 2015-16; but do not be deceived by the snuggly title; because behind the words is a vicious determination to allow people to be ‘helped’ to kill themseves. Just consider those few words in my previous sentence. There are those who would put themselves up to be arbiters of life, or death; but not for themselves; oh no: they are all for taking or allowing others to do their dirty work for them, in their belief that they KNOW BEST, and they claim that they should be allowed to move their plans onward, until we see the same ghoulish glory as I wrote of some time back, when the ‘Public Ambulance Service Ltd’ (Gemeinnützige Krankentransport GmbH) officers and doctors were told that they had to kill the feeble-minded because Befehl ist Befehl (Orders are Orders). It is not, as some may write, a slippery slope, but a straight-forward leap towards a ‘Eugenics-based Society’ where the strong survive, and the weak go to the wall, or to the ‘clinic’. It is but a matter of semantics to step from a Law which allows a person who is mentally competent to be ‘helped’ to commit suicide; to the darkest hours of civilisation as we know it, in that terrible phrase; The Final Solution.

That simple proposed Act of Parliament, just as the one which fell in the House of Lords as it ran out of time, should be a warning to us all, that there are those amongst our Rulers who simply ‘know’ that they must ease the path towards death for all who desire it, and thus erase the final barrier to a system which, once adopted, will be yet another surrender to those who would Rule us from cradle to Grave! The backers of the Bill are a bunch know as Dignity in Dying, but their progenitor comes with a much nastier name; viz. Voluntary Euthanasia!

 

23 Responses to “Not a step: but instead a Leap!”

  1. you seem of late to pick such lively topics Mike. As I have been very ill of late it might just be that I am noticing it more.

    The idea of suicide to me is abhorrent. My physical deterioration over the past year has been horrendous. It has come to a choice of severe pain or high medication, both are debilitating.

    My absence from this site of late is a direct result. Either I sit in agony or I can’t focus due to medication.

    I have watched my world disintegrate around me. Yet I could never choose to voluntarily take my own life.

    The thing is with Government sanctioned suicide someone could choose to end their suffering. It is a choice that some will make. The worry is when that choice is taken from the individual.

    My condition they can’t determine the cause. Look at what it has caused. Severe pain, loss of my worldly possessions, financial ruin. I could go on. Now because they don’t know what’s going on with my body they don’t know if the pain will ever be cured or manageable. If euthanasia became a policy in a system of government controlled healthcare who is to say some pencil pusher wouldn’t decide that the cost of allowing me to live outweighs any benefit to society?

    Anyone can commit suicide if that is their choice, but when that decision becomes part of public health policy….. that decision will not remain the providence of the individual.

  2. The Troll, on July 22nd, 2015 at 3:22 PM Said:

    The idea of suicide to me is abhorrent. My physical deterioration over the past year has been horrendous. It has come to a choice of severe pain or high medication, both are debilitating.

    I’m sorry to hear that Troll.

  3. thanks Dave, it sucks but I am alive and I believe it will eventually get manageable.

  4. The Troll, on July 22nd, 2015 at 3:34 PM Said:

    thanks Dave, it sucks but I am alive and I believe it will eventually get manageable.

    I’m sure it will Troll. It’s amazing how people can adapt to massive changes in their lives.
    My partner is a care worker, and she looks after people with MS and who are quadriplegic. It’s amazing what a difference a positive attitude can have on the quality of life of people with these conditions. Mind you, I’m one to talk, I only had a pacemaker fitted and I didn’t react well to that. Despite the fact my life hardly changed after the operation.

  5. This proposed bill will not place the lives of anyone in anyone else’s hands. It gives the person themselves the power to decide for themselves whether they want to continue to live or not. And, organisations like Dignitas have very strict rules as to who can avail of this ‘service’ or not. The person must have an incurable, debilitating condition. They must be able to travel to the clinic under their own steam, as it were. They must prove that they are completely aware of the consequences of their actions etc etc.

    The late Terry Pratchett, researched Dignitas and indeed visited and witnessed one person who took this decision. He suggested that a panel be set up, made up of a lawyer, a doctor and one other person, who would interview the person and decide if they were clinically, legally and mentally able to understand and comprehend their decision.

    I’m not an expert on this (and neither, evidently, is Mike Cunningham), and I find myself torn between saying yes or no to it. What would I do, were I placed in such a predicament? Would I wish to ease the emotional burden on my loved ones by taking the assisted death route? Would I only increase their anguish by doing so? Even worse – what if it wasn’t me, but a loved one – my partner, my father – one of my children! – who wanted to explore this? How would I react? It’s very difficult.

    Troll – I sincerely hope your pains – physical, emotional, financial etc – are relieved very soon.

  6. A controversial topic!

    I am firmly in the “against” side for three reasons…

    1) Personal experience (which I won’t go into but which one would have thought would turn me the other way…but didn’t)

    2) The slippery slope argument. I take Seimi’s point about it having to be very strictly regulated etc but the danger is there that it could be abused.

    3)I appreciate the arguments in favour are made in good faith but the idea that the State should at best condone assisted death or at worst collude in it is extremely worrying to me from a moral perspective.

  7. The ‘slippery slope’ argument is supported by the evidence of all other matters which degrade society and social decency. Now the sanctity of life, as damaged by free-and-easy abortion, is being subject to repeated attack. From recent experience, I can understand how it feels to consider ending this life, but we’re here for a reason.

    Troll – best wishes to an adversary.

  8. gratitude to you all.

  9. it’s the slippery slope Seimi.

    Paid for legal suicide leads it to be an option that can be pushed to early as a choice, or worse be a viable choice to the bean counters that pay for your medical treatments.

    Suicide is unpreventable if someone wants to do it no one can stop them. So there is no need for this service except to make the choice an option without stigma.

    Once the stigma has been removed and the suicide clinics are just another clinic the “choice” of suicide then will be pushed as a good economical and “moral” alternative to suffering.

  10. Best wishes to you Troll.

  11. thanks Petr

  12. You’re welcome. I know it won’t do you any good but you are in my thoughts. You are a good guy and don’t deserve any of this.

  13. 😉

  14. The ‘slippery slope’ argument is supported by the evidence of all other matters which degrade society and social decency.

    Such as the abolition of public floggings and executions, which so evidently promoted “society and social decency” has put us on “the slippery slope” to degradation?

    I’m constantly amazed at the so-called social liberterians hereabouts who rail against the nanny state but totally support it against individual liberty when it suits their narrow politics. So smoking dope in youur own home should be a prison offence, but owning attack grade weapons should not be.

    And the practicalities of voluntary euthanasia are that if you can afford it, go to Switzerland and if you can’t, tough. Social justice is a commie concept. Stay at home and die without dignity, and often in great pain. I saw this happen.

  15. Either I sit in agony or I can’t focus due to medication.

    Troll

    I’m sorry to hear this. I hope you get it sorted soon.

  16. thanks Peter

  17. Troll.

    Hoping for better times ahead of you.

    Harri and family.

  18. // Personal experience (which I won’t go into but which one would have thought would turn me the other way…but didn’t//

    I think I know what you mean. Watching someone – anyone – face down the horror of terminal disease, pain and impending death with courage and dignity is a very edifying experience and, in a way, the best emotional argument against euthanasia, whatever about the logic of it.
    We all become much richer in the face of such bravery and it would be a big pity if it, for whatever reason, became less frequent.

  19. We all become much richer in the face of such bravery and it would be a big pity if it, for whatever reason, became less frequent.

    Sorry Noel, complete tosh. I saw someone die over a period of 18 months, in and out of the hospice, constant pain, no dignity and agony for his family. There is nothing at all “edifying” about such a death.

  20. I agree with Peter.

    It can be a sustained torture, with nothing good about it for anyone.

    Euthanasia is unavailable most places for many reasons, including that most of us are moral cowards on the matter,

  21. // I saw someone die over a period of 18 months, in and out of the hospice, constant pain, no dignity and agony for his family. There is nothing at all “edifying” about such a death.//

    Peter, I obviously didn’t mean, or say, every painful death. Many people collapse under such pain and horror and die in a wretched state.
    But there are still enough cases of people summoning the last of their courage, even if it’s only for the sake of those looking on, to beat the pain and the fear of death.
    This does strengthen everyone who experiences it. A brave person bearing pain and facing the emptiness of death is indeed an edifying figure.

  22. Noel,

    I 100% agree.

  23. […] wrote on this very subject a couple of years ago, the Law has not changed, Parliament reinforced the negative, but still they […]

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