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Not a single F”#***ing penny!

By Mike Cunningham On July 22nd, 2015

Very shortly, the whole 50-odd million of us who live in England  will wake up to find that, if they visit a supermarket, they will have been the victims of a massive robbery, and they will not be able to complain, or alert the authorities, because this particular crime has been perpetrated by Parliament. Courtesy of Nick Clegg, the alleged MP, along with a staunch follow-up crew from the Daily Mail, they ran a campaign to make everyone who shops at English supermarkets BUY the plastic bags at 5p a pop, with an estimated turnover profit of around £90 million, per year.

These pricks who obviously have never been near a supermarket, and thus have never had to carry their own purchases to a car, have built this Tax to hit everyone but them, and its all for such a good cause!

Whether the so-called environment actually needs protecting is, to my mind, a moot point; what with uniformed Council would-be Nazis jumping on someone for dropping fag-ash on the pavement, but the vast majority recycle the damn things anyway, so what’s the point of making us buy them? Are we going to get our money back if we return or re-use them? I doubt it very much!

aplasticbag2The Act of Parliament which authorises this wholesale garbage goes into such detail as the thickness of the bags, etc., but the one thing it does not stipulate is of course who is going to be the beneficiary of all this lovely cash. The Act primly states that it (the £90-odd million) should go to good causes, so can’t you see the slavering jaws of the greedy clowns from the scum who run the RSPCA, the RNLI, along with the Oxfam Vultures who endorsed the phone campaigns against those who suffer from Dementia; and all the usual suspects as they hammer at the back doors of Tesco, Sainsburys, and the rest, blood in their eyes at the very thought of all that money going up for grabs!
The solution? Use or recycle old bags; buy long-lasting bags, anything: but don’t give 5p, never mind £5.00, to the slavering herd who will be all over the cash, demanding ever more for their f’#**ing so-called blood-sucking Charities!

 

35 Responses to “Not a single F”#***ing penny!”

  1. These pricks who obviously have never been near a supermarket, and thus have never had to carry their own purchases to a car, have built this Tax to hit everyone but them, and its all for such a good cause

    Actually, it gets even better for the serial troughers, they can (and do) each claim £400 a month for food and sundries, no receipt required, no questions asked.

    MPs who claim the most food on expenses
    Nick Brown
    MPs are allowed to claim up to £400 a month for food. Nick Brown, former agriculture minister, claimed the maximum, £4,800 in one year

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/mps-expenses/5394692/MPs-who-claim-the-most-food-on-expenses.html

  2. I think the plastic bag charge is a good thing. It encourages people to do exactly what Mike suggests at the end of his rant piece – re-cycle and re-use their own plastic bags, thus cutting down on the amount being made. They’ve had this system in ROI for years. Personally, I think it’s a good thing that charities (however much some here may hate them) benefit from this. Before the tax, no-one did, except the plastic bag manafacturers.

  3. There’s a great logic to the idea of mandating a charge for plastic bags. They don’t degrade. In America, and in many other places, discarded bags are to be found on the streets, in tree branches, in the woods, and in the sewer systems.

    Even in rural areas, they’re pretty much everywhere, if you bother to look.

    It doesn’t look like the holy ” free market ” has dealt with this issue at all.

    If you agree that the billions of bags all over the land and waters are some sort of problem, then what’s your solution?

  4. I’m astonished at how plastic bags add up.

    When I get my two daily newspapers delivered each is in a plastic sleeve. That’s 14 a week. An average supermarket visit ( in the absence ) of reuse, may easily mean ten more plastic bags.

    I go well out of my way to recycle everything I can, including these bags, but very many people could care less about this issue.

  5. …but very many people could care less about this issue.

    Especially when it means those f!*@ing charities get something out of it…

  6. Actually I’d oppose bringing charities into this, which only complicates things. The charity industrial complex is huge enough as it is, and I’m sure that the beneficiaries of the largesse will only be government approved charities anyway.

    I’d actually let the stores keep the money, which arises from an activity that they don’t want to do in the first place ( charging ). They compete like mad anyway in a business with thin profit margins.

    We don’t need another layer of activity of collecting and disbursing and deciding who is worthy of the getting. Let the stores concentrate on selling food with as little distraction as possible.

  7. Seimi, on July 22nd, 2015 at 12:34 PM Said:

    I think the plastic bag charge is a good thing. It encourages people to do exactly what Mike suggests at the end of his rant piece – re-cycle and re-use their own plastic bags, thus cutting down on the amount being made. They’ve had this system in ROI for years. Personally, I think it’s a good thing that charities (however much some here may hate them) benefit from this. Before the tax, no-one did, except the plastic bag manafacturers.

    Spot-on Seimi. This will push the supermarkets to introduce bio-degradable bags. Which only a few have done so far because they are more expensive the plastic bags. (But are cheaper than the 5p minimum charge.)

    Oh the injustice of being charged 5p for a bag, (you don’t have to buy anyway), and the money going to charity. And those starving bastards in the third world think they have it bad. LOL.

  8. When we owned dogs I was recycling these as poo bags.. Now I’d have to buy proper ones. Not very eco is it.

    These days we use them pedal as bin liners but I suppose we’ll have to buy the proper one’s now.

    So this ‘exciting new law’ means I’m down on me cash and more bags are being brought into existence and ultimately being dumped.

    Remind me what the point of this new law is?

  9. It worked well in Ireland as you don’t see the litter that once was. I agree with Phantom that it is improper to channel it to charities, the stores should keep the money.

  10. The image of plastic bag litter floating in the people’s air in a post complaining about a practical measure that lessons the exposure.

    You cannot make it up.

  11. The government link says that the money should go to good causes.

    Some modest proposals of worthy beneficiaries

    UKIP Campaign Fund

    Zionist Social Clubs

    Cittie Of Yorke ATW Booze Fund

  12. Seimi,

    It isn’t the charities per se that most folk object to, – after all many have been in existence for many years with much generous public support, it is the numerous stories we read of the modern spate of corruption of those who have their noses in the troughs that they manage, increasingly, it seems, more for their personal benefit than for the victims of the charities they manage.

    Tales of salaries and expenses far in excess of what can be called reasonable will do the damage every time.

    A charity’s reputation is priceless and once damaged, by corruption or government interference, is unlikely to regain its previous stature as a ‘worthy cause’. The examples given are but a few of the many cases in point.

  13. Mahons, on July 22nd, 2015 at 1:24 PM Said:

    It worked well in Ireland as you don’t see the litter that once was. I agree with Phantom that it is improper to channel it to charities, the stores should keep the money.

    It will certainly reduce the amount of bags we see discarded in the cities and countryside. I live in a rural area, and the amount of these bags I see blowing around and caught in trees and hedgerows is shocking.
    I’m not sure about letting the supermarkets keep the money though, they make enough as it is. (In the UK anyway.)

  14. Dave – Refresh my recollection. Do the charge for boxes. When shopping in Ireland I often get a box.

  15. In the US supermarkets are a very low profit margin business. Gross profits are maybe 1 to 2 percent. You can make money, based on volume, but its always a tough business.

    Many of the chain supermarkets have been in financial trouble over the years, or have gone bankrupt.

    I doubt its much different in the UK.

  16. Mahons, on July 22nd, 2015 at 1:42 PM Said:

    Dave – Refresh my recollection. Do the charge for boxes. When shopping in Ireland I often get a box.

    No. Funnily enough, my other half often gets a cardboard box too. She uses them to put the paper and cardboard recycling in and I rip them up to put in the compost. (Bloody hell, I sound like a hippy now. And I’m eating Edamame bean and spinach salad for lunch.)

  17. Ernest – I do get that point, I just think that at least now, someone other than the bag manufacturer benefits from these things. I can see Phantom’s point about the shop getting the money, but wouldn’t that just encourage them to produce more bags, rather than less?

    On a related issue – when I was in Zambia a few years ago, we were travelling on the first morning to the compound where we would be based for most of our trip. My brother pointed out the huge flock of birds circling over the compound. As we got closer, I realised they weren’t birds at all, but thousands – literally thousands – of plastic bags, circling in the warm currents of air generated by 96,000 people crammed into an area that would be over-crowded by half that number. The bags rise in the morning, and circle until sunset, when the temperature cools, then they settle again on the compound until the next morning.

    Helping to dig foundations for new buildings was an absolute nightmare, as the first few feet of ‘earth’ you dig through is actually more plastic bag than dirt. That’s where a lot of bags end up. We don’t have that problem here, thank goodness, but it’s what hundreds of thousands of people live with every day, and any measure we can take to reduce that problem is worth it – even at the costly expense of 5p a bag!

  18. Phantom, on July 22nd, 2015 at 1:44 PM Said:

    In the US supermarkets are a very low profit margin business. Gross profits are maybe 1 to 2 percent. You can make money, based on volume, but its always a tough business.

    Many of the chain supermarkets have been in financial trouble over the years, or have gone bankrupt.

    I doubt its much different in the UK.

    Even though I doubt that US supermarkets struggle to make a profit as much as you suggest, things are different in the UK. Supermarkets here like to pretend they are struggling to make money, but a look at where that profit goes reveals that is bullshit.

    http://www.theguardian.com/business/2010/apr/20/tesco-rings-up-record-profits-again

  19. One of the oldest US supermarket chains has just declared bankruptcy

    http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/2015/07/20/p-grocery-chain-files-bankruptcy-again/30404517/

    Dave

    That article doesn’t say anything about the rate of Tesco profit from their gross revenues. It talks only of the gross top line profit, which of course goes up and down. Gross profit without digging what it is made up, gives a very partial story. A big company will of course have a large dollar or pound amount profit but that does not mean that their margins are better than that of some fragrance shop or your local Apple store.

  20. Phantom, on July 22nd, 2015 at 2:01 PM Said:

    One of the oldest US supermarket chains has just declared bankruptcy

    http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/2015/07/20/p-grocery-chain-files-bankruptcy-again/30404517/

    I don’t know this grocery store as it’s American. But in the UK we have had similar smaller chains forced out of business by the big stores.

    Dave

    That article doesn’t say anything about the rate of Tesco profit from their gross revenues. It talks only of the gross top line profit, which of course goes up and down. Gross profit without digging what it is made up, gives a very partial story. A big company will of course have a large dollar or pound amount profit but that does not mean that their margins are better than that of some fragrance shop or your local Apple store.

    Tesco (and the other big supermarkets in the UK), have made massive profits.

    http://www.redmayne.co.uk/research/securitydetails/financials.htm?tkr=TSCO

    And this is taking into account the tricks they, and other big business use to hide profit. (In Tesco’s case they used to buy up land for future development)

    Seeing as our conversations can quickly become confusing or we misunderstand the points we’re each trying to make Phantom, I’m make my position clear.
    I’m not anti business. What I am against is big businesses taking advantage of customers, selling bad products, not paying proper tax and monopolising the market. Tesco for instance has done all of these things. (Devaluing club card points, the horsemeat scandal, using taxpayer money to pay staff for fake training, driving smaller shops out of business selling certain products at a large loss), to name just a few. They are now paying the price for this with reduced profit but are so big, that they are still making a profit.
    I’m on the side of companies that play fair. Not like say Starbucks and Apple in the UK, who pay only a fraction of the tax they should. Both those companies make massive profit. It’s just greed.

  21. Unfortunately, the big stores ( and online stores )are driving out many of the little guys in supermarkets, clothing, pharmacy, any industry you could ever think of.

    I don’t know how you stop it or if it would even be advantageous to do so.

    The little guy has no economy of scale and Tescos / Walmart / Amazon most certainly do have it, along with incredible technology advantage.

  22. Phantom, on July 22nd, 2015 at 2:36 PM Said:

    Unfortunately, the big stores ( and online stores )are driving out many of the little guys in supermarkets, clothing, pharmacy, any industry you could ever think of.

    I don’t know how you stop it or if it would even be advantageous to do so.

    I don’t think it should be stopped, as long as the big and/or online companies are playing by the rules. Amazon is great for getting stuff at home and I use them. But they are another company that treats staff badly and doesn’t pay their share of tax. (in the UK anyway.)

    The little guy has no economy of scale and Tescos / Walmart / Amazon most certainly do have it, along with incredible technology advantage.

    True. which is all the more reason they should play fair, if not fairer that the little guy.

  23. What about the small plastic bags that are used for fruit and vegetables at the supermarkets? Will these be taxed?
    Either way it looks as if we will now have to buy bags for lining the kitchen waste bin.

  24. Relax, lads. This was done in the Republic over 10 years ago.

    The point was to reduce plastic bag use by making people recycle old bags (so you are on-message, Mike, whether you like it or not). The cost was just a disincentive and was ring-fenced for environmental use. It was up to the supermarket/retailer to collect and pay the correct amounts. There were exceptions – including, if I remember correctly, vegetable/fruit bags.

    It was a fantastic success and massively reduced the awful scourge of discarded plastic bags scattered everywhere.

    Conservatives (in the true sense of the word) should be supportive of this as it will conserve the environment.

  25. Again, this is one of a million cases where ” the market ” and ” free choice ” isn’t and can never be the solution to the large problem of plastic bag waste in the land and waters.

    A small charge doesn’t resolve the problem completely, but it sure can help.

  26. Again, this is one of a million cases where ” the market ” and ” free choice ” isn’t and can never be the solution to the large problem of plastic bag waste in the land and waters. a big problem.

  27. “The solution? Use or recycle old bags; buy long-lasting bags, anything:”

    That’s the point, Mike. Duh!

  28. these pricks who obviously have never been near a supermarket

    Have you? The supermarkets offer a “bag for life” whereby you buy one for 50p and thety replace it free of charge when it wears out. Alternatively you pay 5p tax for the small ones.

    The bag tax is purely voluntary, but don’t let that stop a good ignorant rant.

  29. US markets are often very careless with the plastic bags. They use too many of them.

    They’ll put things in plastic bags that simply don’t need to be bagged – ie a large melon, a 12 can sleeve of soft drink cans.

    I am forever telling people in small or large stores – ” no bag ” for a certain item

  30. it’s a load of rubbish, and insertion of Peters Religion onto the public, nothing more.

    Evil man is destroying mother Gaia so you must be guilted and taxed into worshiping her with your behavior and your financial tribute.

  31. I thought you gave a rat’s ass about the environment.

    Endless numbers of these bags are polluting our lands and waters now.

    A load of rubbish indeed.

  32. it’s a load of rubbish

    The only rubbish (apart from your comment) is all the bags used once and then trashed into landfill.

  33. That’s the small problem

    The big problem is the bags ingested by wildlife, fouling their living spaces, in the waters and woods never to degrade.

    The bla bla bla guys hate ” the government ” more than they love the environment.

  34. Mike — Have you not written to your MP about this yet you silly old curmudgeon.

  35. Here in NI, the plastic bag levy seems to be working extremely well. Plastic bag use has fallen dramatically, whereas in England it has actually risen.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-northern-ireland-33645149