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WHY STAY IN THE EU?

By ATWadmin On October 27th, 2008

Telling statistics.

British businesses are being tied up with record levels of Brussels red tape, a report warned yesterday. The TaxPayers’ Alliance says that UK firms are struggling under the ‘severe burden’ of EU regulation, which is estimated to cost £150billion a year. The study found that there are currently 16,980 EU laws in force in this country and they are increasing at a rate of 2,000 a year. It said that Whitehall had added to the regulatory burden by using EU directives as ‘vehicles for their own policy agendas’ and attaching numerous additional clauses and extending their scope – a practice known as ‘gold-plating’. Ben Farrugia from the alliance said: ‘Regulations are an enormous burden to business, particularly in a time of financial hardship. The EU’s addiction to regulating and Whitehall’s compulsive gold-plating have added billions to business costs in recent years. ‘Both the legislative process which has created this regulatory tangle and Britain’s relationship with the EU needs a serious rethink.’

Not really much to think about. We need OUT.

16 Responses to “WHY STAY IN THE EU?”

  1. 1. Repeal the ’73 European communities act.
    2. Directly thereafter, stop payment of the £10,000,000,000,000 pa EU subscription.

    2a. We could bail out a few domestic banks for that amount
    2b. Then next year re float Icelands economy.

  2. Sorry DAVID but the UK fell into the tender trap several generations ago when the EEC was spawned.

    The European Union concept was conceptualised by several Hitler wannabes to satisfy their thirst for power which they were denied when America rescued Europe from the Nazis. And, unfortunately, many countries were conned into believing that the Socialist idea of the Rich (Germany, The UK & France) countries shelling out billions to the less wealthy ones (Ireland, Italy & Greece) would come without strings attached.

    Greed, and the lust for the American "life-style" has placed the 3rd-world European countries in the position of Peasant States.

    AND,

    They fell for the scam now it’s pay-back time.

  3. Eddie –

    Despite all the history, it would take only the repeal of the European Communities Act 1973 to regain our independence.

    Parliament could make it happen today.

  4. >>Greed, and the lust for the American "life-style" has placed the 3rd-world European countries in the position of Peasant States.<<

    What are you talking about? Ireland’s per capita GDP is higher than that of the US (and the UK and France).

    Just in case any of our American friends are led astray by the Little Englander ramblings here, it should be pointed out that the business community in the UK, like everywhere else in Europe, is very much in favour of EU membership, and indeed of joining the Euro.

  5. Noel Cunningham –

    That ‘the business community’ is in favour of something is no recommendation for anything.

    If ‘the business community’ is in favour of our continued membership of the EU it’s because EU laws, regulations and directives both raise the costs of market entry to many potential competitors and keep ongoing costs of participation proportionately high for smaller, efficient market players..

    The EU is good for large, innefficient, corporatist, oligopolists who would be driven into the ground by a free market and fair competition.

  6. >>That ‘the business community’ is in favour of something is no recommendation for anything.<<

    Nor was it meant to be.

    But it does sort of take the wind out of David’s post above.

  7. It does nothing of the sort. First, what IS this "business community" and where can I get an invite? Do you mean large multinational business or SME’s? When did the vote take place that now allows you to claim as you do?

  8. Noel Cunningham –

    Well not really. First, I’d be extremely dubious of any poll that says ‘the business community’ or some such entity is in favour of the EU.

    Polls exist to either to shape opinion or sell papers. There is no other reason for them to exist.

    The costs of regulation in the end are passed on to us because all goods and services are more expensive by it. But initial costs for new businesses are often so high they cannot enter a market, or the ongoing costs of regulation so high that businesses must merge to absorb those costs (as with High St banks).

    These costs are burdens on business, and yet some businesses will not mind at all. They’ll view high entry and regulation costs as a form of tariff to keep the competitition less fierce than would otherwise be the case.

  9. Noel Cunningham: "What are you talking about? Ireland’s per capita GDP is higher than that of the US (and the UK and France)."

    Noel Cunningham: "Just in case any of our American friends are led astray by the Little Englander ramblings here,"

    Little Irelander ramblings are OK. But the English are to be ridiculed when they look to their own self interest.

  10. >>First, I’d be extremely dubious of any poll that says ‘the business community’ or some such entity is in favour of the EU.<<

    So then I won’t have to provide the data from the British Chambers of Commerce disproving David’s claim.

    Incidentally, by the "business community" (ugly phrase, I know) I meant businesses as represented by such organisations as the Confederation of British Industry, which is clearly in favour of joining the Euro. Support for Sterling is still high among SME’s, as David says (except for those in Northern Ireland!), but I don’t doubt the vast majority of them at least support continued EU membership.

    >>The costs of regulation in the end are passed on to us because all goods and services are more expensive by it.<<

    True, but so will hopefully benefits generated by increased consumer confidence, savings in insurance and litigation costs, and the easier flow of goods within the EU that were made possible by standardised regulations.

    Besides, a focus on regulation is hardly a fair way to judge the benefits of membership for British business – a majority of British exports is now within the EU, and export opportunities and greater inward investment are the advantages that nobody wants to, or can, do without.

  11. >>Little Irelander ramblings are OK<<

    Apl, my patriotism has other sources, more the Phoenix than the Celtic tiger 🙂

    My point was that Ireland can hardly be thought of as lusting after "the American life-style" and being a 3rd-world country or a "Peasant State" when its per capita GDP is higher than that of the USA = i.e. that Eddie’s ramblings are a load of blarney.

  12. "Incidentally, by the "business community" (ugly phrase, I know) I meant businesses as represented by such organisations as the Confederation of British Industry, which is clearly in favour of joining the Euro"

    This is also one of the reasons heavyweight trade unions are opposed to the EU on principle. They fear greater power ceded to business. In addition to this Britain refused to sign up to the famous Social Charter which gives workers more rights, so trade unions want us out. (It should be noted that most anti EU diatribes pretend that we have signed this thing when we have not).

    Noel is also spot on with his last paragraph regards British exports in Europe. Though I would agree that using the phrase Little Englander is incorrect given all member states have a vested economic and business interest in the EU while all have publics swayed by needless misleading jingoism.

  13. a majority of British exports is now within the EU, and export opportunities and greater inward investment are the advantages that nobody wants to, or can, do without.

    Not quite a full and frank statement there.

    The majority of British trade (I last read at 98%+) is internal, within Britain.

    Our exports are split fairly evenly between the EU and the rest of the world, which is quite astonishing since the EU is a half closed, protectionist economic block and our trade with the rest of the world has fallen sharply as a percentage since 1973.

    We do not need a single EU law, diective or regulation to promote European investment into Britain. We simply allow it as we wish.

    It really won’t do to dress up the EU as some kind of free market friend. Look again at the post. The TPA (a reputable bunch) estimates the cost (to us, at the end of the chain) at £150billion annually.

    This is quite astonishingly, ludicrously expensive. By leaving the EU we can still trade freely with European peoples (‘nations’ do not trade) and have £150billion free to go where it will be of greatest benefit.

  14. Greed, and the lust for the American "life-style" has placed the 3rd-world European countries in the position of Peasant States.

    Utter bilge. Perhaps the stupidest comment I have ever seen on ATW, at least this month.

  15. Noel Cunningham –

    By the way, the excellent work of the TPA aside, the economic case for or against our membership of the EU is irrelevent to me.

    Regaining our right to govern ourselves and becoming again an independent people is all-important.

    Even if I thought there were strong economic benefits to being in the EU I would still argue against our membership.

  16. Peter –

    Utter bilge. Perhaps the stupidest comment I have ever seen on ATW, at least this month.

    Well, the Obama supporters haven’t justified their choice yet!