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EVERYBODY NEEDS GOOD NEIGHBOURS…

By David Vance On March 15th, 2017

Despite the hysteria from some Irish Nationalists and their media whores, the REALITY of what will happen to the border between NI and the Irish Republic becomes clearer by the day.

Brexit Secretary David Davis said the UK would adopt technology to cover the movement of goods between Northern Ireland and the Republic. He gave evidence to his Westminster scrutiny committee about the future of the UK’s only land frontier with an EU state. He said: “It is not going to be easy, it is going to cost us money, a lot of work on technology, to put border controls in but without having border posts – but that is what we intend to do.”

This is how it was ALWAYS going to be. Brexit is about going forward, not back. I want to ensure that relations with the Irish are good and trade is maintained. Naturally the Irish must ensure that their country does not become a Trojan horse for EU illegal immigration into a sovereign United Kingdom.

25 Responses to “EVERYBODY NEEDS GOOD NEIGHBOURS…”

  1. //Brexit Secretary David Davis said the UK would adopt technology to cover the movement of goods between Northern Ireland and the Republic//

    He’s dreaming. For decades the Irish border was the most tightly monitored frontier in western Europe, with huge observation posts with the most sophisticated technology the British taxpayer could provide, patrolled by the British army, and that same army actually blowing up auxiliary roads to ensure only main crossing points were used..

    er,… well, that was the idea. The reality was that the IRA was always able to move men and materials across the border at will, while every local gobshite could smuggle in both directions anything that people wanted.

    It will be no different after a Brexit. Any physical border will only hinder lawful traffic.

  2. Davis also reported on the apparent eagerness of the EU negotiators to avoid creating a hard border in Ireland. Let’s hope they mean what they say:

    “He noted that the European Commission also has “a strong emotional investment” in the Northern Ireland peace process. Mr Davis told MPs that even though chief European negotiator Michel Barnier reiterated that there could be no formal Brexit negotiations ahead of the UK triggering Article 50, he has wanted to talk about Northern Ireland in meetings with UK ministers because of his personal commitment to the process.

    The Brexit Secretary confirmed that both the UK and Ireland want to maintain the Common Travel Area which allows for the free movement of people between both jurisdictions. He said the aim is to create a situation identical to the 1949 Ireland Act, which already gives effective citizenship rights to British and Irish people resident in either country. Mr Davis says he does not foresee the European Commission raising objections to the maintenance of the Common Travel Area.”

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-northern-ireland-39279800

  3. Good news, Peter.

  4. What Davis has to say is nice, but it is the EU that has the last word. I expect the Germans, French, et al would insist on a hard border. And, will the UK suddenly become supporters of an open border?

  5. Technology to cover the movement of goods between Northern Ireland and the Republic

    Hahahahahahahaa.

    Garrisons of soldiers, fleets of helicopters, hi tech state of the art surveillance watchtowers couldn’t do it. Good luck with that.

    As some wit once said, ‘the people of South Armagh are born smugglers. What a stupid place to put a border’.

    Even though chief European negotiator Michel Barnier reiterated that there could be no formal Brexit negotiations ahead of the UK triggering Article 50, he has wanted to talk about Northern Ireland in meetings with UK ministers because of his personal commitment to the process.

    Good news indeed.

  6. David,

    Did you not say recently “the harder the border, the better”?

    Anyway, I’m glad that you and the British Govt have seen sense.

    It looks like the massive behind-the-scenes diplomatic efforts by the Irish Govt with the British and the EU are starting to pay dividends. It would be an enormous achievement if they can pull it off.

  7. Why bother with a land border. Ireland is an island isn’t it? Much easier to police a water crossing.

  8. Much easier to police a water crossing.

    Dog

    I live in Northern Ireland. Are you saying that I should have to present my British passport when I board a flight to London? And that a Londoner needs to do the same when flying to Belfast? Which would mean an internal border within the UK, and if it ever happened it would be another reason for the UK to break up.

    But I’m sure that you just haven’t thought it through.

  9. What Davis has to say is nice, but it is the EU that has the last word.

    Not with us. We’re going to be a sovereign, independent, self-governing people once again. No-one wants a hard border, so we’re fine. The unknown is with the EU and its Dublin satrapy.

  10. MourneReg – yes, he said that here just a few months back. http://www.atangledweb.org/?p=65415

  11. And here is a great reason to leave the EU:

    “Lorry drivers moving goods in Western Europe for Ikea and other retailers are living out of their cabs for months at a time, a BBC investigation has found. Some drivers – brought over from poorer countries by lorry firms based in Eastern Europe – say their salary is less than three pounds an hour. They say they cannot afford to live in the countries where they work. One said he felt “like a prisoner” in his cab.

    Ikea said it was “saddened by the testimonies” of the drivers.”

    It’s surprising that Ikea apparently had no idea that using Eastern European trucking firms which pay less than 20% of the minimum wage in Sweden was an unforseen event, as opposed to one deliberately calculated to further fatten the profits for their billionaire fat-cat tax-dodging owners at the expense of the untermenschen in both Lithuania and Sweden. Because the wages of Swedish truck drivers have been suppressed by this rent-seeking for decades. And of course the same applies to drivers from the UK and Ireland who have been similarly screwed by big supermarkets and the rest of the usual suspects.

    It reminds me of the aristocracy in France in 1789. From “A Tale of Two Cities” (Dickens): “Drive him fast to his tomb.”

    Look it up.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-39196056

  12. Build the wall. It shouldn’t be difficult. The Romans did it in similar terrain.

  13. Peter- even flying within the UK you need to prove your identity before being allowed to board a plane.
    Here’s what one airline says.

    ID for UK domestic flights – what can you take?

    If you are flying within the UK you must be able to identify yourself with a form of photographic ID. Here’s a list to show you what forms will be accepted at check-in:
    •A valid passport – an expired passport can be used up to a maximum of five years after expiry
    •Valid photographic EU or Swiss national identity card
    •Valid photographic driving licence, provisional or full
    •Valid armed forces identity card
    •Valid police warrant card/badge
    •Valid airport employees security identity pass
    •CitizenCard
    •Valid photographic firearm certificate
    •Valid Government-issued identity card
    •SMART card
    •Electoral identity card
    •Pension Book (the only acceptable form of non-photographic identification)

    Passengers must present one of the above forms of valid photographic identification on all UK domestic flights. No other forms of photographic identification are accepted. If you do not have one of the above means of identification, easyJet cannot accept you for travel.

    So whats the problem with presenting a passport to gain access to the mainland?

    We all will have to change a bit post Brexit and this seems to me to be a very minor issue.

  14. Pete Moore

    So now you are for open borders? If there is an open border with Ireland anyone in the EU can hop over to Ireland and cross the open border into the UK. Is that your revised opinion?

  15. Enda Kenny meets with Trump.

    http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2017/03/16/trump-greets-irish-leader-at-white-house.html

    The St. Patrick’s Day White House event dates back to the 1950s and has become an important standing engagement for Ireland, which has strong emotional and ancestral ties to the United States.

    Speaking after Trump at the luncheon, Kenny showed off his country’s famed wit, saying that he “just saw the president of the United States read from his script.”

    But Kenny was also complimentary.

    “Let me congratulate you, President Trump, on your election,” he said. “You beat them all.”

  16. NY –

    I’m for an open border as long as it doesn’t imperil the UK. All countries naturally reserve the right, in the end, to enforce border controls. If the RoI becomes a staging point for primitives to sneak into the UK then we can do something about it.

    It’s in the RoI’s interest, just as much as for the UK, to make sure that the riff-raff don’t take advantage.

  17. Correct.

  18. The riff-raff took advantage hundreds of years ago, Pete. They still hold part of the island 😉

  19. The riff-raff are importing more riff-raff, and this time it isn’t our own riff-raff:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1yJ87y7BR80

  20. Who are these media whores who serve the evil nationalists?

  21. Pete Moore

    How would anyone from any EU country be detected if they crossed the ROI-NI border if there are no controls? If a guy flew from Poland to Dublin then took a bus to Larne and a ferry to mainland UK I don’t think his identity would generally be checked in the ROI or the UK.

    If you have an open border anywhere I cannot see how that stops migrants which was one of the aims of Brexit. It is like a leak in a dike. And it is probably legal.

  22. //I don’t think his identity would generally be checked in the ROI or the UK. //

    RoI isn’t a signatory to Schengen, so everyone gets passport checked on arrival in Ireland.
    All EU nationals are of course free to travel within the Union.

    Refugee applicants are not allowed travel outside their host country until their refugee status has been recognised.

    Once their application has been approved, however, refugees receive a special refugee passport, which allows them travel to most countries in the world, subject to normal visa requirements (they automatically lose their status if they travel to their home country).

    Recognised refugees are, however, not entitled to work, or reside for more than 3 months, outside their host country.
    So, both a Pole and a recognised refugee could easily move from continental Europe to RoI and then to NI and from there on to Britain. As far as I know, in the current legal situation, the refugee wouldn’t even be breaking the law if he moved through RoI to the UK. He would break the law only by staying longer than three months or commencing employment.

  23. Noel

    Just to be clear, could a Pole fly into Dublin then cross the border into NI without a problem?

    The reason I’m interested is that if the ROI becomes an open ‘back door’ at some point it will probably be an issue and possibly bring about a hard border. If someone like Farage started shouting about an open back door and hordes of migrants streaming through into the UK, the political reaction might be we will close the back door, ie, a hard border.

  24. //Just to be clear, could a Pole fly into Dublin then cross the border into NI without a problem? //

    Yes, of course. He would have to show a passport at Dublin airport, like everyone else, but would then be able to travel freely around the RoI, NI and Britain without encountering any border control.
    As an EU national, he’s also be able to work in RoI or the UK.

    After a Brexit, he would be technically breaking UK law by travelling into the North.
    I’d imagine they will simply agree on some kind of arrangment where EU nationals arriving at Irish ports will be handed a slip of paper telling them that they may not travel on into NI or from RoI to Britain. (the “soft border” BTW isn’t just between RoI and NI; you can also travel by boat from Dublin to England without crossing any noticeable border). You must remember that the open border and passport-free travel has existed since the State was founded, any foreigners able to reside in RoI back then were also able to, but not entitled to, move around between the two islands. Even during WWII this arrangement was continued.

    There were customs controls until 1972, but no passport controls. It’s ironic that it became advisable for an Irishman to carry ID when travelling to Britain – because of the Troubles – exactly the year the customs posts were abolished.

  25. Noel

    Thanks for the answer. I had forgotten there were no passport controls years ago. If extreme Brexit people insist on a hard border I suppose people who live near the border could have some type of electronic pass and there might be some type of passport control office for all others. Then there is the nightmare of North South freight. With a hard border it might be possible extreme Brexit people would demand the closure of the probably hundreds of local roads that cross the border. I take what David Davis says with a large grain of salt.

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