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WAGE APARTHEID….

By David Vance On July 16th, 2017

Some amongst the UK political commentariat seem OUTRAGED that the Chancellor of the Exchequer has reportedly stated that Public sector workers are “overpaid”

Let me be clear. He is absolutely correct.

The Institute for Fiscal Studies said workers employed by the State earned 13 per cent more on average than those in the private sector. This is despite a one per cent cap on annual pay rises in the public sector for the past six years. The IFS said that even if this cap continued for another three years, public sector staff would still be earning 7.5 per cent more than private sector workers by 2020.

That 13% premium they enjoy is on top of their generous pensions, holidays and security of tenure.

And IF you think the 13% is an outrage – try this little nugget.

Public sector workers in Northern Ireland are earning 35% more than those employed in the private sector, a report has revealed.

What? And we are told they are “suffering” and need an increase? Pull the other one.

No – we need to cut wages for many of them, but not all. I believe those serving in areas such as the Armed Forces, Intelligence services and elements of the NHS do deserve an increase. The rest deserve a cut IF we are serious about..erm…equality!

 

12 Responses to “WAGE APARTHEID….”

  1. Good for you for saying that some in the NHS deserve an increase. Clearly true.

    As a taxpayer, I am very happy to pay hard working public sector people a fair wage.

  2. This is common knowledge and has been the case for many years, especially when pension rights are taken into account.

    The more interesting question is how Hammond’s comments at a Cabinet meeting a few days ago came to be leaked to a Murdoch rag. There is a suspician, which Hammond did nothing to contradict today, that it was leaked by one of the arch-Brexiteers in the Cabinet in an attempt to undermine Hammond who has emerged as the leader of “sensible Brexit” in May’s government. Sensible Brexit means putting the economy and jobs ahead of flag-waving, and if necessary, agreeing an interim arrangement for (say) three years after March 2019 during which the UK would remain in the Single Market while a long-term trade deal is agreed.

    The alternative is a “hard Brexit” whereby the UK leaves the EU and the Single Market in March 2019 with no trade deal and pursues the fantasy of multiple “free trade” deals with Trump’s USA, India, China, Australia etc. Those would take years to negotiate and the terms are likely to be unattractive, as beggars cannot be choosers as well. For example, the UK currently runs a trade surplus with the USA. Any deal signed with Trump is bound to attack that and probably insist on lower agricultural standards for imports from the USA, which would mean no restrictions on US hormone-treated beef.

    But for Liam Fox this would be a price well worth paying. His first action in his new office last year was to hang a picture of Cecil Rhodes on the wall.

  3. Peter

    In NYC and some other places, police/fire/sanitation and some other workers actually get to retire and receive pension benefits after 20 years time.

  4. 20’years on the job

  5. Phantom

    It’s true that the average public sector worker has done better that the average pivate sector worker for the past thirty years or so. One reason for that is that trade unions have survived in the public sector and have been all but eliminated in the private sector as jobs have been outsourced to China etc.

    But of course if you look at the top 5% in the public sector compared to the top 5% in the private sector the story is reversed. And let’s not even look at the top 1% or the top 0.1%.

  6. “Let me be clear. He is absolutely correct.”

    Nonsense

    “The Institute for Fiscal Studies said workers employed by the State earned 13 per cent more on average than those in the private sector.”

    The private sector employs many minimum wage and unskilled workers. There are not many such people employed by the state.

    A better comparison would be between comparable jobs.

    If NHS doctors and nurses earn more than private sector doctors and nurses, or state school teachers earn more than private school teachers or civil service computer programmers earn more than private sector computer programmers then you can make the case that they are over paid.

  7. No ! Most of the Public Sector needs to be either privatised or, have its ‘market’ opened up to competition.

    The NHS Budget should be just that, a budget. Hospitals and staff do not need be in public ownership. Only A&E need to be in Public ownership. And for all those who think I am wrong, here in NHS England we have private (G4S) ambulances. We do not have to pay for their services at the point of use, unlike the USA I believe, but they are a sign that competition is there and working.

  8. Good for you for saying that some in the NHS deserve an increase. Clearly true.

    Nurses, HCA’s ,Hospital Doctors, are not paid nowhere near enough in the NHS, having just spent two days in hospital again with another suspected heart attack (it wasn’t, I just strained a chest muscle) the care I received at my local NHS hospital (L&D Bedfordshire) was first class and outstanding.

    It’s not a case of we don’t pay them enough, we can’t pay them enough for the work they do, angels, all of them.

  9. I suspect that the only areas where state employees are poorly paid is where the state is the majority employer, probably teachers and nurses. Even then they get very good pensions which I doubt are matched anywhere in the private sector.
    It is the higher levels in state enterprises where I believe management staff are grossly overpaid, particularly in the NHS, Universities and local councils. They claim that they need it because of their enormous responsibilities, but in fact they never take real responsibility. They claim that the recent NHS computer system problems were not their fault but the fault of Jeremy Hunt. Councils claim that they can’t repair the roads because of “cuts”. No CEO would get away with this by claiming a failure was all the fault of the Chairman or cuts because of poor sales. You also notice when a business has to make cuts, they always start in the “back office”. The reverse happens in the public sector, the paper pushers remain and it is the front line which is cut.

  10. Having just spent two days in hospital again with another suspected heart attack (it wasn’t, I just strained a chest muscle) the care I received at my local NHS hospital (L&D Bedfordshire) was first class and outstanding.

    Glad to hear it wasn’t anything serious and hope you’re fighting fit Harri.

    You had a fairly dismal view of the NHS after the treatment your mother received, has this view now changed?

  11. You had a fairly dismal view of the NHS after the treatment your mother received, has this view now changed?

    Not towards NHS management, my dear Mothers inquest is now over, so time to move on.

    I have never had a problem with frontline staff.

    They are angels.

  12. I have never had a problem with frontline staff.
    They are angels

    Agreed.

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