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It’s NOT an Opioid Crises it’s a Heroin Crises

By Patrick Van Roy On September 13th, 2017

I have a real issue with this politically correct naming of the Nations Heroin Crises being called an Opioid Crises. It’s pure BULLSHIT of the most dangerous kind.

It paints a Picture that the problem is somebody who broke their back, or had some major injury was prescribed to many Oxys or some other pain killer from a doctor and they got addicted, od’d and died….. Sorry that’s a frackin fantasy, one that is causing problems.

The CDC has put out restrictions on Doctors limiting the amount of Pain medication a patient can have in a 24hr period to 1.2 pills. Now that applies to everyone, Cancer patients included. Your doctor if he feels your pain rates more than that must fill out a ten page appeal form to be reviewed by the insurance company to meet Federal Guidelines. This has to be done for every Opioid Prescription every month for every refill. This will not save a single life, but it has made the life of millions of sick people a further Hell.

The US over the past 8yrs has been flooded with cheap powerful Heroin. It comes right across the Southern Border. I don’t care and don’t want to hear from the loonz that will say it’s the CIA, it’s the Government or some bullshit conspiracy.

What it is, is an abundance of cheap powerful heroin, an abundance of unemployment and misery and Government/Insurance Restriction on addiction therapy.

The Government/Insurance Restriction on addiction therapy is they will only pay for 28 days of treatment. 28 days of treatment is NOT enough. If an addict goes through the 28 days 8 out of 10 go back to using. A 90 day treatment has a recidivism rate of 3 out of 10, but both Government/Insurance will NOT pay for 90 days.

As usual the Politicians are causing more problems than they are fixing.

When you hear someone mention “Opioid Crises” Please correct them. It’s a HEROIN CRISES not an opioid one.

Here is a good story on the HELL that is going on all over the US, Please take the time to glance it over.

Seven Days of Heroin, this is what an epidemic looks like

43 Responses to “It’s NOT an Opioid Crises it’s a Heroin Crises”

  1. I’m talking with senior people very close to this issue ( no details ).

    It is an opiod crisis. Heroin is an opiod, but it is not the only one.

    Some doctors are morons, and have been loose in prescribing opiods. Some patients become addicted very easily. Controls are much tighter now, but they were not tight enough ten or fifteen years ago. I personally know people that used Oxycontin for legitimate purposes and who were given a few extra pills in case they needed them later – that was bad medicine.

    The various abuses of prescription medicines in the US is an immense problem. The US is a drugged up society as compared with other nations, and prescriptions are totally part of that.

    Even if there was no illegal heroin, there would be an opiod problem, as addicts or idiots have stolen prescription drugs from those that legally have them, from doctors, from pharmacies.

    And fentanyl, much more addictive than heroin if you can believe that, is emerging. It has been coming from China, it is now being made in Mexico. It will soon be made in the US I am sure. No wall can keep it out. Big big problem.

  2. “One man walks toward the glass doors at the clinic’s entrance with a sleeping baby on his shoulder and a girl in pajamas at his side.”

    And that sentence describes the sheer awfulness of that same ‘opiod epidemic’.

    My solution? Revise the Justice System to include the Mandatory Death Penalty for all Drug Pushers who are arrested carrying more than One Day’s fix, as determined by individual States.

  3. https://www.usnews.com/news/best-states/indiana/articles/2017-06-23/indiana-crackdown-on-opioids-sparks-more-pharmacy-robberies

    INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — As the nation’s opioid epidemic intensified, Indiana cracked down on over-prescribing doctors and “pill mills” catering to people with addictions. The state also took aim at doctor-shopping — the practice of visiting multiple physicians to score more painkillers.

    The measures had an impact, but not what officials hoped for.

    While making opioid prescriptions harder to get, the crackdown also helped spur a twofold increase in robberies of pharmacies that exacerbated the state’s standing as No. 1 in the nation for those crimes. Between 2009 and 2016, Indiana had 651 pharmacy robberies — the most in the U.S. and more than the 597 recorded by No. 2 California, which has six times the population, U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration records show.

    The frequent holdups reflect a grim reality: With each regulation or law enforcement tactic, the opioid crisis quickly shape-shifts to evade new obstacles. Dealers and those struggling with addictions adapt, and the epidemic continues with little interruption.

    Good practice can have very bad effects too.

  4. China and Singapore execute drug dealers.

    I oppose the death penalty but must admit that those nations have this thing under better control than the US does.

  5. //they were not tight enough ten or fifteen years ago//

    If an opiod addict lives an otherwise healthy lifestyle and has plenty of money and easy access to his drug, can be continue to live a reasonably normal life, with work, socialising etc. even with his addiction, anyone know?

    Also: in the US, why do mid-western states like Indiana have such a drugs problem?
    I also heard that drugs like crack-cocaine are city slickers while meth is a country drug. There must be some reason for this weird spread.

  6. If an opiod addict lives an otherwise healthy lifestyle and has plenty of money and easy access to his drug, can be continue to live a reasonably normal life, with work, socialising etc. even with his addiction, anyone know?

    I’m no medical professional, but I have heard of people doing just that.

    in the US, why do mid-western states like Indiana have such a drugs problem?

    That’s a big, important question. Some of it may have to do with the deep boredom that young people in rural areas can feel, some of it may have to do with the despair that came from the loss of jobs in some areas. ( Though Indiana is way better off than some states in that regard. Appalachia has really bad structural unemployment that has been around for ages )

  7. Some are so vulnerable to peer pressure, esp the young.

    If someone offered me heroin or meth, I’d call the police on them in a New York second.

    But some want to try something new. They think that the rules don’t apply to them.

  8. Canada has a big problem too

    https://www.thestar.com/news/canada/2017/04/25/an-epidemic-within-an-epidemic-why-opioid-use-in-canada-keeps-rising.html

    Canada is in the midst of an epidemic of opioid use and abuse — involving both prescription and illicit forms of the potent narcotics — that shows no signs of abating and has led to an explosion of fatal overdoses.

    So pervasive is the problem that it has become part of the Canadian consciousness and left doctors, public health officials and politicians scrambling to find solutions to contain the crisis.

    Canadians remain the second highest per-capita consumers of opioids in the world, after Americans. But while U.S. use is beginning to decline, Canada’s numbers keep rising, according to the International Narcotic Control Board, which monitors countries’ prescribing levels.

    In the developed world, it’s a north American thing. Much less of a problem in Europe and Asia. US opiod consumption three times higher per capita than UK/Ireland/Germany, Spanish use is half of those other European countries.

    US use is 120 times higher than in Russia.

    https://ppsg.medicine.wisc.edu/

  9. Belfast had a zero heroin problem before the 21st century.

    There’s was a reason for that.

    Now smack is everywhere with overdoses every other week and kids robbing chemists for prescription drugs.

  10. I will never understand how anyone takes heroin, LSD, or cocaine for the first time.

    Impossible to compute.

    Not trying to lecture, I just had the greatest distrust of all those things from day one.

  11. I oppose the death penalty but must admit that those nations have this thing under better control than the US does.

    There’s a more humane way. Almost all of the heroine in the US comes from Mexico. Build the wall, protect the border, and the problem is resolved.

    Why do liberals want everyone hooked on heroine instead?

  12. Sure. And build walls around the meth labs in the US too.

  13. I read somewhere, that most of Canada’s Heroin comes from Afghanistan, ?

    I thought the poppy fields were in decline since Uncle Sam invaded?.

  14. here come the loonz…. it’s the cia

  15. Phantom –

    I said heroine, not crustal meth. I’m quite precise like that. The Great Wall of Trump, combined with good border checks, will end 90 per cent of the trade.

  16. Afghanistan is the principal source of heroin.

    For better or worse, that trade is flourishing.

    The poppy growers and transporters pay tax to the Taliban and are under its protection.

    If we aggressively tried to destroy the trade, the entire country would be against us.

    Drugs aren’t a supply problem, they are more a demand problem. And if most or all of it is legalized, it can be controlled, while you de-fund the Taliban, Hezbollah, FARC, the mafia and many other bad actors.

    You win the war on drugs by fighting it in an entirely different way.

  17. Pete 727

    The Great Wall of Trump, combined with good border checks, will end 90 per cent of the trade.

    That Maginot Line won’t work. It can come in by sea or plane if you block the land transport.

    Besides you don’t believe in government. Trump wants to confiscate our taxes to halt transactions between willing buyers and sellers – remember?

  18. The Great Wall of Trump, combined with good border checks, will end 90 per cent of the trade.

    Ridiculous. The wall, (if it’s ever built that is), will have minimal if any effect on this multi billion dollar business.

  19. China and Singapore execute drug dealers. I oppose the death penalty but must admit that those nations have this thing under better control than the US does.

    China and Singapore have societies that are very different from the USA. You are comparing apples with oranges.

  20. Build the wall, protect the border, and the problem is resolved.

    LOL

    As if they don’t use planes and ships. And NAFTA allows thousands of big trucks free access to the USA every day. They would all have to be stopped and deep-searched and trade would grind to a stop in a few days.

    This is not what Rightworlders like to hear, but there is no easy quick-fix answer.

    But it’s obvious that Prohibition has failed, just like it did in the 1920s.

  21. Peter 742

    I know but there are only two ways that I know of that begins to solve this thing

    Decriminalization/legalization
    or
    Utter ruthlessness, killing dealers and even users

    We won’t have the stomach to do the second option, and are not smart enough to try the first.

    Walls, more cops, more jails, are trying to stop the tide with a coffee cup.

  22. The war on drugs is a pipe dream, it can’t possibly be won.

    Portugal has decriminalized all drugs, and they have seen a reduction in drug use.

  23. Yes Harri, well observed.

    The tide is turning as more and more states decriminalise to a greater or lesser degree. It is the the worst possible solution, apart from Prohibition and mass-incarceration.

    Watch Narcos and learn. Or The Wire. Or Boardwalk Empire.

  24. Harri

    Correct

    All western lands should be studying what Portugal is doing.

  25. The amount of people going to jail for drug offenses in Portugal has decreased 60% post-decriminalization.

    There is now better drug treatment in the country. HIV and AIDS rates have also declined substantially.

    I will assume the Portuguese government are quids in also, reduction in the prison population for drug offences, less workloads on the police, and an increase in tax revenues.

  26. Does anyone know what winning the “war on drugs” looks like?

    Because the authorities have never even come close.

  27. It’s a win for everyone except maybe the prison guards union and the companies that build jails for a living.

  28. Precisely Phantom..

    Divert all funds from imprisonment of minor drug offences, to education.

    It’s far cheaper, and far more effective.

    Educate the population, before imprisoning it.

    The government’s to stand tall, and admit defeat on the “war on drugs”, there are more drug dealers in Towns & Cities, than there are chemists.

    It’s time to change tact, but unfortunately that takes radical thinking, and sadly that is way above our peers heads.

  29. In this country, the only movement is towards pot legalization in western states.

    In the big eastern states, very little move even to that among the brain dead Democrats, and forget about the Republicans. They’re all afraid about being called soft on drugs.

  30. It’s a win for everyone except maybe the prison guards union and the companies that build jails for a living.

    Phantom

    The incarceration industry are major “political funders”, i.e. they have the GOP bought and paid for. Jeff Sessions is a True War on Drugs Hero, because the prison corporations are among his biggest financial supporters.

    As always, follow the money is good advice:

    “In May, Sessions reversed his predecessor’s initiative, claiming, without evidence, that Holder’s sentencing changes had led to America’s sudden 10.8% increase in murders in 2015.

    Sessions, a former senator from Alabama known for his hardline views on crime and legal immigration, had been denied a federal judgeship in 1986 over alleged racist comments and attacks on the NAACP and the American Civil Liberties Union (he first admitted, and then disputed, calling these organizations “un-American”). Martin Luther King’s widow had written a letter opposing Sessions’ appointment, saying he had “used the awesome power of his office to chill the free exercise of the vote by black citizens” through “politically-motivated voting fraud prosecutions”.

    Appointing Sessions as attorney general “was like hosting a Confederate flag above the Department of Justice,” says Eugene Jarecki, a filmmaker who directed The House I Live In, an award-winning 2012 documentary about mass incarceration.

    What is so striking about the move by Sessions and the Trump administration is that it is at odds with much thinking across the globe about the war on drugs, including among leaders in Latin America. Ever since 2011 when Juan Manuel Santos, as the president of Colombia, declared that the war on drugs had failed, a growing international consensus has been forming on the need for a new conversation to discuss the violence, bloodshed and ruined lives that followed in the wake of the war on drugs – whether in Colombia, Mexico or America.

    The change in direction in the US has come at a time when America has been also seeing an increasing number of states liberalizing laws on the consumption and sale of marijuana. Into this evolving international and national context has stepped Sessions, with a very different approach.

    The new attorney general and his initiatives represent a huge setback for advocates who have worked for decades to build bipartisan agreement that America’s war on drugs had been a failure and it was time to reverse the damage. ”

    https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2017/aug/21/donald-trump-jeff-sessions-war-on-drugs

  31. Pete doesn’t believe the wall will have the slightest impact on the flow of heroin into the States, he just likes to throw in a positive reference to a Trump policy to wind up ATWs leftie liberals (aka sensible) brigade !

  32. What’s even worse than the prison/prison guard industry?

    Private for profit prisons.

    One of the more evil concepts that you could ever think of

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kids_for_cash_scandal

    The “kids for cash” scandal unfolded in 2008 over judicial kickbacks at the Luzerne County Court of Common Pleas in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. Two judges, President Judge Mark Ciavarella and Senior Judge Michael Conahan, were convicted of accepting money from Robert Mericle, builder of two private, for-profit youth centers for the detention of juveniles, in return for contracting with the facilities and imposing harsh adjudications on juveniles brought before their courts to increase the number of residents in the centers.[1][2]

  33. The real irony comes, when the authorities, along with our judicial system, imprison people for drugs offences, and drugs are as freely available inside prison, as they are outside prison.

    We are being led by donkeys.

  34. One of the more evil concepts that you could ever think of

    A fucking moral, ethical and humane aberration Phantom. A subtle form of people trafficking.

    Kudos on the Portuguese drugs stuff H. Great catch.

  35. Peter your stand that you put forth in your last comment has good solid thinking in it. There are a things I agree with it on however there are two things that are total spin.

    Sessions, a former senator from Alabama known for his hardline views on crime and legal immigration, had been denied a federal judgeship in 1986 over alleged racist comments and attacks on the NAACP and the American Civil Liberties Union (he first admitted, and then disputed, calling these organizations “un-American”). Martin Luther King’s widow had written a letter opposing Sessions’ appointment, saying he had “used the awesome power of his office to chill the free exercise of the vote by black citizens” through “politically-motivated voting fraud prosecutions”.

    This whole paragraph is pure bullshit and democrat spin lifted directly out of the democrat spin book. For gods sake you even state hardline views on LEGAL IMMIGRATION. Sessions has been a leading voice in the war on ILLEGAL IMMIGRATION NOT LEGAL IMMIGRATION.

    Everything in that paragraph is bullshit.

    and then there is this:

    “In May, Sessions reversed his predecessor’s initiative, claiming, without evidence, that Holder’s sentencing changes had led to America’s sudden 10.8% increase in murders in 2015.

    Eric Holder was responsible for not only the increase in murder, but the increase of inner city crime in every category.

    He was a Racist that who changed the Justice Department into the SOCIAL JUSTICE DEPARTMENT.

  36. Paul

    Those two Pennsylvania judges Who sent the teenage offenders to unfair long stretches in their buddy’s private for profit prison are still in prison themselves, and they will remain there for quite some time.

  37. and they should be,,,,

    Hey Phantom the real leaker of all the democrat campaign info leaks and what looks like huge amounts classified intelligence has made a deal.

    Debbie Washedupschults IT guy Amir PakiSpy had been downloading huge blocks of data to his own private server, that server is in FBI hands and Amir’s wife just voluntarily turned herself over to American Authorities in Pakistan.

    The only reason for her to do so is if the feds have made a deal with Amir to testify which politicians knew what.

    He’s the inside leak for everything, there never was a russian hack, or a hack of any kind every bit of stolen information can be directly tied to democrat stupidity.

    I just hope they actually have the balls to prosecute. If this is true and this guy has been stealing secrets and these people tried to cover it up Schultz and several others need to go to jail.

    If they don’t then it’s not just the Clintons, but all politicians that are above the Law.

  38. ladies and gentleman Thank you for your comments.

    This issue is very dear to my heart. The reasons for drug abuse and addiction are as varied as the amount of addicts that walk the earth.

    There are a lot of people that have problems in there life. Not everyone that has used drugs is an addict, just as not everyone that has a drink is an alcoholic.

    Once someone however is caught up in addiction whether it’s alcohol, heroin, crack, meth, prescription drugs etc their life decends into an even deeper hell.

    Addiction is always a symptom of another problem. The symptom however becomes the major problem. A 28 day program is just barely enough time to sober someone up, it does NOT give enough time to scratch the surface of why the person got lost in addiction in the first place.

    The government does NOT belong in the Healthcare business everything they do causes more problems than any it ever tries to fix.

  39. The government does NOT belong in the Healthcare business everything they do causes more problems than any it ever tries to fix

    That simply isn’t true at all Troll and their are numerous overwhelming examples which disprove it.

  40. not in my country

  41. That’s precisely the point I make.

  42. The government does NOT belong in the Healthcare business everything they do causes more problems than any it ever tries to fix.

    Entirely, laughably, incorrect. In the US, Canada, Europe, everywhere.

    Ideological Republican extremist obstructionism to proper health care for all US citizens and legal residents is setting the stage for a ” single payer ” system. Which is not my choice at all ( I would go more down Switzerland’s road than Canada’s ) if the Dems have no one to negotiate with on this matter, they will have a moral free hand to do what they see fit once they win a big Congressional election, which will happen soon enough. And once that happens, it will never get undone.

  43. Not only is government involvement in healthcare tolerable, it is 100% necessary.

    Without it, you have Somalia, the only example I can think of where a government might not have any real role in healthcare.

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