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You can’t make us watch Soccer

By Phantom On October 11th, 2017

Last night, the US was eliminated from Soccer World Cup contention by a country that apparently calls itself Trinidad and Tobago.

If you were listening to WFAN, the 24 hour sports call in station today, you would hear the following subjects that are of greater interest to the locals

Tonight’s NY Yankees playoff game vs Cleveland

Who the next manager of the NY Mets will be

The anti American flag protests by NFL thugs

College football

And a million other things

I can’t tell you how small a subject the US elimination is here. The US is different. Soccer is the sport of the future, and it always will be.

16 Responses to “You can’t make us watch Soccer”

  1. Only corporate types worry about these things in their quest for perpetual growth.

    The NFL and NBA want to break out of the US while FIFA (football’s world governing body) is desperate to break in. Why? Money of course. Bigger audiences = more ad revenue = can sell broadcasting rights for more money.

    Fans don’t care either way. If Americans want to watch football, fine. If not, no worries.

  2. Correct.

    The NFL would like to have a franchise in London someday.

    Also, Major League baseball may well have teams in Mexico and Japan at some point.

  3. We could have beaten Trinidad or Tobago. But we had no chance against their combined power (sad day).

  4. //Last night, the US was eliminated from Soccer World Cup contention by a country that apparently calls itself Trinidad and Tobago…

    I can’t tell you how small a subject the US elimination is here. The US is different. Soccer is the sport of the future, and it always will be. //

    Well played, Phantom.

    I like to see all the big names in football present at the World Cup, as well as Ireland (in fact all 5 teams from the British Isles), the US, Australia, Israel, Iran and Slovenia.

    Pity it’s not to be for the US; Scotland and Wales are unfortunately also out. But it still looks good both teams from Ireland, and of course England has already secured its ticket to Russia.

  5. I was trying to think of something witty to say about soccer, or football as we call it here, but I care about the game so little I just couldn’t think of anything.

  6. I love soccer, and World Cup is fun. My boys play now.

  7. I’m sure Trump promised in his election campaign that if elected he would ensure the USA won the next World Cup and it would be the GREATEST WIN EVER !

    He has failed to honour that promise. impeach him now !! 😜

  8. We’ll send our women to kick all your asses, It’s a girls game anyway……

  9. Soccer is indeed a fine sport but this is the greatest ‘ball game’ on earth:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TmzivRetelE

  10. Hurling is a wonderful sport, a great spectacle

    I’ve never seen any effort by the GAA or anyone else to expose it to the wider world outside of Ireland and the Irish diaspora in which is a pity. It deserves more of an international prominence that it has.

    As some will know, they actually held a GAA Gaelic football final in New York City’s polo grounds in 1947, right after the war. Now that was a creative thing to do, so long ago

  11. I’ve never seen any effort by the GAA or anyone else to expose it to the wider world outside of Ireland and the Irish diaspora in which is a pity. It deserves more of an international prominence that it has

    I hear what you’re saying Phantom but have mixed feelings about it. Such a move may lead to the disappearance of playing the games for love as amateur sport?

  12. I’m not talking about having the game go professional, with teams in other countries or any of that necessarily

    But the GAA final games should in my opinion be broadcast in the United States, where AFAIK they are not Broadcast on any normal over the air or cable TV channels. They are broadcast as far as I know on a narrow-cast network that is only available in a small number of participating pubs.

    To me, this is completely stupid, even if they get more revenue by doing it this way.

    There are so many national sports TV channels here now that one of them would be willing to broadcast it. It would be a wonderful thing for Irish exiles here to be able to see, end it would be a good advertisement for the country.

  13. It would be a wonderful thing for Irish exiles here to be able to see, end it would be a good advertisement for the country.

    Again, I can hear what you’re saying but my worry would be that because of GAA’s immense popularity big advertising would become involved and erode the amateur status of the sport played for love and passion of the games.

  14. //As some will know, they actually held a GAA Gaelic football final in New York City’s polo grounds in 1947, right after the war. //

    Yes, they still talk about that in Cavan.

    The match was played in NY to commemorate the centenary of the Famine – Black ’47, as the worst year of the Famine was called.

    It was Cavan vs Kerry, The Cavan team flew to NY, but the Kerry team went by boat. Both teams returned by boat.

    The two teams were booked to stay at the Commodore hotel on 42nd street, beside the Grand Central, although several team members simply went off to stay with their relatives in the city.

    That’s the way it was back then: you got up and dressed, your aunt made you a good Irish breakfast and then you strolled off to the polo grounds to play in the All Ireland Final.

    One Cavan footballer, P.J.Duke was a close friend of my father, and came from near the same village, Stradone. P.J. played a decisive part in Cavan’s victory in NY that day. Sadly, he died just three years later of tuberculosis aged only 25.

  15. There is a GAA exhibition game in Boston this November.
    http://www.gaa.ie/hurling/news/double-header-announced-for-aig-fenway-hurling-classic/
    Any sport that keeps its sporting ethos over the urge to make money on a global platform to the detriment of its roots is ok by me.

  16. The 47 final has entered folklore, particularly in Ulster (and probably has God-like status in Cavan).

    My father was notoriously hard to please regarding great footballers. But, excluding Down-men, he had three in particular: Mick O’Connell of Kerry, Sean Purcell of Galway and Tony Tighe of Cavan (who played in the 47 final).

    I was interested to hear somewhere (can’t remember where) that, for what would become such an iconic event, there was massive opposition and it almost never happened. Makes sense, I suppose. They would never get away with doing it nowadays.

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