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Brooklyn Bartenders

By Phantom On October 20th, 2017

In Brooklyn, bartenders are important people, local celebrities.

The Jimmy Kimmel late night show, which normally tapes in Los Angeles, is based in Brooklyn this week. It’s been a big success so far.

Here, he speaks to some of our local bartenders.

The first one interviewed is a friend, Jerry Henderson, of Pippin’s Pub, in Bay Ridge.

Bars are essential parts of our culture. Support your local bartender.

22 Responses to “Brooklyn Bartenders”

  1. The barman/barmaid in my local knows our order and is pouring it as soon as we walk through the door. They’ll also no when to start pouring your next beer before you finish your first. Unfortunately, the local pub is becoming an endangered species in the U.K.
    The big bars in the city centres don’t have the personal touch. Table service isn’t too common so people go to the bar for service, although our biggest chain (JD Wetherspoons) has introduced a phone app where you order & pay on your phone and the order is then delivered.
    In my local the staff are ‘pleasantly miserable’ when compared to the full on American customer service experience. I often wonder how a business would fare in the U.K. if it could train and enforce the US service model. I think most locals would think they were taking the piss!
    The big difference is the tipping culture. I once saw an American in a ‘non tourist’ pub in London. He was buying 2 drinks at a time and leaving £3 on the bar after each round. The money was left untouched on the bar. He was leaving the pub after 5 drinks with £15 in coins stacked up. My friend advised him to take it with him. He was aghast. The bar staff laughed & said they were wondering why the cash had been piling up. They took ‘half a pint’ of him and he walked out with a pocketful of pound coins and the advise not to tip in any pub. He said he felt very uncomfortable doing it.

  2. The worst thing in a pub is the customer that orders a big round at the bar and adds the Guinness last.

  3. The barman/barmaid in my local knows our order and is pouring it as soon as we walk through the door. They’ll also no when to start pouring your next beer before you finish your first

    I used to work on Third Avenue in Manhattan, near Grand Central. We used to frequent a pub called Keats

    They used to have a barmaid named Jackie, from Ireland. She was like the staff at evan’s pub. Had a friendly hello and comment to everyone, and was totally efficient. The place could be jam packed on a Thursday night, and you’d never wait for anything.

    Which makes it frustrating when you run into a disinterested barman who makes you wait even when the joint is not crowded.

  4. Unfortunately, the local pub is becoming an endangered species in the U.K.
    The big bars in the city centres don’t have the personal touch

    Unfortunately true on both points.

    Pubs / bars are an essential part of Irish, English and American culture. So much so that in Ireland anyway they are the very fabric of social and community life, (or were).

    I love pubs. I love everything about them, the smells, the noise, the music and should the local, corner or village pub ever die civilisation would certainly be worse for it.

    Phantom, you’ve been in my local in Belfast, you understand why I love and miss it so much.

    And now, if you’ll allow me to drop into Colm mode for a second.

    That barmaid can serve me anyday.

  5. Agree with all those comments!

    NYC is rightly famous for its vast number of Irish/Irish American pubs.

    But the also excellent English/British pub tradition is alive and well.

    http://www.bbcamerica.com/anglophenia/2015/01/10-british-go-pubs-nyc

    There is even a Welsh pub, near where I live

    http://longbownyc.com/

  6. Phantom, test their authenticity next time you pass one.
    Any decent English pub must have a foot rail around the bar, and coat hooks under the bar that are only noticeable to regulars.

  7. What would the reaction be if you took the ‘authentic British pub’ at its word and didn’t tip the barman!

  8. evan

    Will do

    Yes, that is a huge difference between US and British/Irish pubs. You don’t tip the barman there, you certainly are expected to here. But at many bars here you get the ” buy back ” ( free grog every so often ) which is good.

    A popular bartender at a busy pub can make a lot of tip money in the States.

  9. Whilst I love many parts of mainland Europe, their pub culture is dreadful. Even in places like Germany where they love their beer my general experience has been that the bar-staff are lazy, disinterested and so so slow. And that is in pubs where you actually can order from the bar as opposed to bloody compulsory table service (shudder).

    Of course, there exceptions to this – but these prove the rule.

  10. Generally agreed Reg.

  11. In my local the staff are ‘pleasantly miserable’ when compared to the full on American customer service experience.

    The cancer of American customer service is spreading here. All of a sudden young people are wishing me a nice day when I pay for something.

    Bugger off.

  12. I’m OK with that.

    What irks me is when someone who you will never see in a million years gets personal with you.

    Yesterday, I spoke to a customer help person who is in India. Never spoke to him before. He calls me by the first name and asks me if I’m looking forward to the weekend. Well buster, you don’t get to use my first name and you don’t care if I drop dead Saturday morning, so quit the act.

    Not really his fault, because probably some McKinsey swindler told him that’s how you bond with the consumer.

  13. I’m British. It’s jarring to hear someone who isn’t blonde and American wish me a nice day. In the US fine. Over here it’s just not natural. I’d prefer a disinterested yawn as I’m handed my change, but then I’m a traditionalist.

  14. How ye doing, what are ye having? is fine.

    One of the cancers of pub culture is the Christmas ‘I stand here every year’ Eve drinker in your local.

    Those bastards should be burned alive.

  15. Totally agree Paul. They are also the type that ask for the Guinness as the final drink in the round they’re ordering.
    One improvement in my local is that they introduced contactless payment. It is useful as I don’t always have cash on me these days. However, I’ve seen two people in there paying for their rounds using their watch! It put me off my pint. I now ensure I always take cash with me and I’m campaigning for the machine to be taken out

  16. The type that ask for the Guinness as the final drink in the round they’re ordering.

    Another breach of bar etiquette and a death sentence if the barman is busy.

    One improvement in my local is that they introduced contactless payment

    Evan, my local back home doesn’t even have a facility for paying by card!!

  17. Cards in the recent past were not common in Europe. What a convenience they can be.

    Early this year, one of our tech genius friends who buys and sells bitcoins met us at the Three Jolly Pigeons pub. He had all his bitcoins but no cash. On planet earth, you can’t buy pints in too many places with bitcoins.

  18. They can be convenient Phantom, particularly as less cash is carried these days, but Paul’s pub have got it right. You give technology an inch and it takes a mile.

  19. Cards in the recent past were not common in Europe. What a convenience they can be.

    What’s wrong with cash for small purchases? Today I stood behind someone in a coffee shop who paid for a £2 latte with a chip and pin card. There is a cash machine outside the front door. 🙁

  20. I’d rarely use a card for that small a purchase.

    But in the US anyway using an ATM machine can lead to a surcharge of up to $5, which is insane. The banks are almost forcing you to use plastic.

    You can use the ATM to get cash and pay a fee, or use a credit / debit card and the bank in some cases pays you a cash back of up to 2%!

    https://www.citi.com/credit-cards/credit-card-details/citi.action?ID=citi-double-cash-credit-card

    There are still lots of small restaurants fruit markets and other places here that are cash only. The little guys don’t want to pay the fees to the credit card companies and I understand that.

  21. Our ATMs are usually free to use. But it’s possible that we could lose up to 25% of them because of new rules on business rates (property taxes) which will charge a premium on business premises which have a cash machine. I understand it’s under appeal at present.

  22. There are still lots of small restaurants fruit markets and other places here that are cash only. The little guys don’t want to pay the fees to the credit card companies and I understand that.

    Phantom

    The Fintech revolution has produced a number of internet-based low-cost card payment solutions for small businesses. They don’t have to get ripped off any more.

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