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THE BEAUTIFUL TIMES

By Pete Moore On May 13th, 2018

What were you doing in October 1996? That’s when Arsene Wenger became the manager of one of the world’s great football clubs. Today, 22 years later, he’s just managed the Arsenal for the last time.

A lot of Gooners are facing the moment with trepidation. In truth his best work is well in the past. All coaches, players and even fans are just passing through. The club always remains. But what times he gave us. I went all over Britain and Europe with the Arsenal until 2002. (I still have my season ticket, but someone else uses it since I moved too far from London.) I doubt I’ll ever see a team as good as our Incincibles, the 2004 team which won the league unbeaten. I’d be forever grateful to Wenger for that alone, but he gave all Gooners a million fond memories.

We’re now joining the rest of the herd, probably to roll over coaches every two or three years. He ought to have stepped aside, or been nudged, a few years ago, but he lives with a mania which few of us will know. So Wenger was the last of the great dictator managers. He was always elegant and dignified, something else for which I love him. Apart from that time he tried to strangle Mourinho at Stamford Bridge, but who wouldn’t love to do that?

Merci Arsene.

16 Responses to “THE BEAUTIFUL TIMES”

  1. Never seen the attraction of watching a bunch of overpaid, under talented primadonnas kicking a ball around a field for 90 minutes.

  2. Well said Pete. Chelski have had 17 managers since Wenger was appointed.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Chelsea_F.C._managers

  3. Every one knows the worlds greatest football club is the Saskatchewan Roughriders

  4. Slightly off topic: did anyone else think it curious that Liverpool supporters in Rome for their last CL match were warned that they should not walk alone from the stadium to the train station?

    As far as I can see, no dark reference was intended.

  5. Never seen the attraction of watching a bunch of overpaid, under talented primadonnas kicking a ball around a field for 90 minutes.

    Absolutely agree there Dave.

    Personally, I would rather watch grass grow.

    A) just listening to Wenger makes you start to nod off, and B) Sir Allan Sugar had it right many years ago “if most of these young men were not playing football, they would be in prison”

  6. Sir Allan Sugar had it right many years ago “if most of these young men were not playing football, they would be in prison”

    Wow, no stereotyping of working class kids on Sugar’s behalf there.

  7. Paul

    I assume Sugar owned “The Spurs” at the time.

  8. Talking of rather watching grass grow.

    Paul.

    Have you bought a new hat for the Royal wedding this weekend?

    😉

    Strangely enough, I haven’t bothered.

  9. Paul McMahon,

    Wow, no stereotyping of working class kids on Sugar’s behalf there.

    To be fair Paul, you’re taking Alan Sugar’s comments out of context. He was not stereotyping working class kids.
    I’m no fan of Alan Sugar’s, but there is some truth in what he says. At the time he made the statement, it was demonstrated the professional football players as a group, have a disproportionate amount of involvement in crime such as serious motoring offences, sexual assaults, violent assaults and financial irregularities, such as tax evasion.

    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/1483416/They-are-total-scum.html

  10. While there are a few cases cited in the article Dave I’m not sure how representative that is of football players as a group. There are thousands of professional football players in England alone.

    As for tax evasion, the Paradise Papers show that it’s not only football players who engage in such underhandedness.

  11. Go Chelsea

  12. It will be interesting to see where Arsenal go from here. He should have gone 5 years ago but leaves a massive legacy from his earlier years.

  13. Paul McMahon,

    While there are a few cases cited in the article Dave I’m not sure how representative that is of football players as a group. There are thousands of professional football players in England alone.

    I’m actually trying to find the link to the article I read Paul. However it was from over 10 years ago, and I’m not having much success. I thought it was in The Guardian. A reporter had actually done the maths, showing that as a group, Professional Footballers had higher than average conviction rates for the crimes I stated.
    At the time it wasn’t just Alan Sugar he was critical of Professional Footballers.
    There were quite a few high profile rape and serious motoring offences cases in the news back then, linked to football players.
    Just to make it clear I’m sure, (maybe hope), that the majority of professional football players are decent people. But for such a well paid profession, they do punch above their weight when it comes to committing certain crimes.

    As for tax evasion, the Paradise Papers show that it’s not only football players who engage in such underhandedness

    I agree Paul, but that doesn’t excuse the football players.
    One of the worst for personal tax evasion, are our MPs. What a bunch of scumbag hypocrites they are. And don’t get me started on big corporations.

  14. //I agree Paul, but that doesn’t excuse the football players.//

    But it puts their behaviour in context. You’d have to prove that footballers are more prone to tax evasion or sexual misconduct than other people with the same wealth and celebrity status, especially other people who don’t need any particular level of education to attain that status.

    Are footballers more likely to commit tax evasion than successful business millionaires, musicians, etc. or more violent or sexual crime than, say, boxers or other millionaire sportsmen?

  15. Noel

    The original article only made a comparison between Professional Footballers, and the general public as a whole when it came to committing certain crimes.
    But you’re absolutely correct Noel, it will be interesting to know how professional sportsman from other fields, or for that matter, rich, powerful and privileged people compared to the general public on committing these crimes.
    I find facts and figures like these fascinating. It gives a real insight into how the human psyche works.

  16. I suspect that footballer criminality is lower than might be expected.

    Not only are they paid anything from well to astronomically, we’re talking young men who are fit, energetic and who have a lot of spare time (most training sessions only last a couple of hours).

    Line up a comparable number of politicians in that situation and I’m pretty sure the politicians will behave worse.

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