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TRUMP IS RIGHT

By Pete Moore On July 13th, 2018

How amusing. Remainiacs who welcomed Barack Hussein Obama’s economic threat to the British people, that we would be “at the back of the queue”,  for a trade deal. They’re now furious that President Trump has exposed how the awful May lied to the British people, by (correctly) saying that a trade deal is not possible.

May’s BRINO policy is for the UK and EU to have a “common rulebook” on trade goods. That common rulebook is the current set of EU rules. It would mean that non-EU countries trading with the UK would need to comply with EU rules. No other country will agree to that. The President is absolutely right.

And we’ll note yet again that the snowflakes are triggered by honest, straight talk.

63 Responses to “TRUMP IS RIGHT”

  1. //Barack Hussein Obama’s economic threat to the British people, that we would be “at the back of the queue”, for a trade deal.//

    So it now turns out that Obama, in addition to his other deep wisdom, also had the gift of prophecy. According to the loudmouth the other day, there’ll be no deal with the US after Brexit.

    //May’s BRINO policy is for the UK and EU to have a “common rulebook” on trade goods. That common rulebook is the current set of EU rules.. //

    The same as both Norway and Switzerland have. Remember Norway – the country you said would be a model for the post-Brexit UK?

    That’s what you wanted and that’s what you’re getting. You should be celebrating.

  2. Maybe the UK should join the EEA Noel?

    Boris seemed to want such an arrangement:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X7Mhokzv-jw

  3. Trump publicly meddles in British matters In the middle of a painful and protracted process,And the British lackeys sit up and yip Their approval

    We need British bulldogs, not british lapdogs

  4. Phantom –

    Again, you fail to understand.

    May is the political enemy. She is acting with and for the EU against the wishes of the British people. Trump is on our side. He’s giving us covering fire. Tory Brexiteers are still trying to unite around what to do. Trump just pulls the pin and says what he thinks.

    For the avoidance of doubt: I support Trump and welcome him. May cannot go soon enough.

  5. Opinions on Brexit and how it should be structured Or whether it should be reversed are irrelevant here

    Trump is overtly, publicly, meddling in Britain’s internal affairs in a highly disrespectful way

    The United States has no right to be an actor in the Brexit process

    Let the British and EU sort it out, Be helpful in a discreet fashion if it’s appropriate. And adapt to the new European reality once it has been agreed

    Brexit supporters are supposed to be concerned about sovereignty; Yet here they giggle and support a blundering Americans disrespect of the British right to negotiate their own affairs

    Remarkable

  6. Trump is God,

    Putin is God,

    May is the enemy,

    Remember Norway.

    Magnificent. We really are going down the rabbit hole now 🙂

  7. Does any British person here deny that this is meddling in the affairs of the United Kingdom?

  8. Phantom

    Brexit supporters are supposed to be concerned about sovereignty; Yet here they giggle and support a blundering Americans disrespect of the British right to negotiate their own affairs

    Well said Phantom.
    The hypocrisy is laughable to read.

  9. Phantom –

    Your president is not meddling in Brexit. Barack Hussein Obama did that when he threatened us economically before the referendum. He came here to influence our plebiscite, to meddle in our affairs. The referendum is done now.

    Your president is here on a political visit. He is entitled to give a straight answer to a straight question. If he was here on a state visit then it would be out of order, but the commies didn’t want a state visit. Ah well, so he’s entitled to speak.

  10. The Brexit process is hardly concluded.

    The US does not have legitimate interests at stake here. We can work with an EU with the UK in it, we can work with an EU that has the UK halfway still in it, we can work with an EU and UK where the UK is outside of the EU trade things.

    The UK has long been a very close ally, the EU and its various predecessors have been supported by every president since Harry Truman.

    Trump is meddling in British and European affairs. No serious person can say otherwise.

  11. The UK and EU are both friendly to the US.

    How they organize themselves is their affair, not that of this or any US president.

    Europe should not have a place at NAFTA, the US should not have a place in Brexit negotiations.

  12. Barack Hussein Obama did that when he threatened us economically before the referendum

    Here you are Pete:

    Obama argued that he had a right to respond to the claims of Brexit campaigners that Britain would easily be able to negotiate a fresh trade deal with the US. ‘They are voicing an opinion about what the United States is going to do, I figured you might want to hear from the president of the United States what I think the United States is going to do.

    And on that matter, for example, I think it’s fair to say that maybe some point down the line there might be a UK-US trade agreement, but it’s not going to happen any time soon because our focus is in negotiating with a big bloc, the European Union, to get a trade agreement done’

    https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2016/apr/22/barack-obama-brexit-uk-back-of-queue-for-trade-talks

    Obama was perfectly entitled to respond the position of his administration on Brexit in an American trade context.

    Does Australian / American Rupert Murdoch meddle in Brexit?

  13. I think that what Obama said was unacceptable and undiplomatic as well. I said it at the time.

    But what Trump just said was much worse, much more disrespectful.

    The Plastic Brits here hate the EU and love Trump so much that they’ll accept anything that he does, not matter how clumsy and disrespectful to British interests and British sovereignty.

  14. And we’ll note yet again that the snowflakes are triggered by honest, straight talk.

    Poor Pete

    Your hero has rowed back dramatically from “no trade deal” and accused The Sun of fake news:

    “A US-UK trade deal “will absolutely be possible”, Donald Trump has said, after he told The Sun Theresa May’s Brexit plan could kill an agreement. Speaking after talks at Chequers, Mr Trump said the US-UK relationship is “the highest level of special”, while Mrs May said they had discussed plans for an “ambitious” trade agreement.”

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-44821976

  15. Trump doesn’t even pay attention to what he himself says. Someone sign him up as a contributor here.

  16. Peter –

    He was being polite. He knows that May’s White Paper will not allow a deal.

  17. Pete

    My point was that “honest straight talk” is not Trump’s strong suit.

    And anyway, any trade deal with the USA would result in hormone-injected beef and chlorinated chicken in UK shops, without special labels. We know that Trump would insist on this as part of his “fair trade” agenda.

  18. “Chlorine-washed” chicken Peter, not chlorinated.

    Whether they came in and were not labelled is a matter for the deal-makers and the law. Even if it comes to pass, it might not be as bad as the horse meat our European partners keep passing off as beef.

    Anyway, are you saying that all of our American friends on ATW are being poisoned by their farmers?

  19. I am saying that US food standards are more relaxed than UK-EU standards when it comes to hormone injections and GM crops. That may or may not be problematic for health, but I know that if I was a meat-eater I would not eat hormone injected beef. Would you?

  20. Fair labeling is a fair request.

    There is no evidence that GM is harmful, but some people think it is, and they should know what they are buying. Same with the other things.

  21. Well played, Peter. Trump has now called his Sun interview “fake news”. A total volte-face within only 48 hours.

    Pete was of course completely fooled. Yet again.

  22. .. but I know that if I was a meat-eater I would not eat hormone injected beef. Would you?

    No. I only eat meat which is British and organic.

    The law says that food labels must show the country of origin for beef, veal, lamb, mutton, pork, goat and poultry. I strongly suspect that this is EU-wide. Therefore any such imports from the US must comply.

  23. Do you support regulations that mandate such labeling

  24. No, but while I’m highly dubious of such things I wouldn’t buy food without knowing its provenance and quality.

  25. Therefore any such imports from the US must comply.

    As of now. After a “free trade” deal with Trump those rules could be history. And if that happened and UK consumers were prevented from knowing the provenance of their beef, the result would surely be a big reduction in beef consumption. Which I would say is a consummation devoutly to be wished, so a big thank you Mr President for helping to bring it about.

  26. If there is no labeling, it’s harder for the average person to know what they’re buying

    And without a requirement, there will be a lot less labeling.

    Food companies play games and have been known to make the labeling misleading or hard to follow ( tiny fonts ) etc. Which is why some regulators say the exact format that must be used down to the font. That’s not over regulation, its proper.

  27. Peter –

    No. May’s White Paper explicitly rules out deregulation of agri-foods. It protects the CAP rulebook and calls for ever growing harmonisation on future rules. There’s not a chance of food labeling rules being watered down.

  28. If there is no labeling, it’s harder for the average person to know what they’re buying

    It’s not just without labeling. It’s with labeling too. For years we thought we were buying “beef” from Europe. Turns out it was “horse”.

  29. It’s clear that Trump would want the UK to accept US beef, hormone-injected and all. And the Brexiteer fanatics like Boris Johnson and Owen Paterson and Jacob Rees-Mogg have no problem with this, even if the labelling rules were abolished.

    From Katy Balls at The Spectator:

    “Donald Trump began the day as No 10’s nightmare guest after the US President performed a diplomatic no-no and gave an interview to the Sun newspaper claiming Theresa May had ruined Brexit and that a UK/US trade deal was off. Matters weren’t helped by the fact news broke of this as the Prime Minister was talking up free trade with the President at a black tie dinner at Blenheim Palace.

    Yet this afternoon a humbled president hummed a different tune – telling hacks that a US-UK trade deal was on the table as he had been reassured by conversations with the Prime Minister (and said the Sun interview was ‘fake news’, despite it being recorded). He went further – heaping the syrup on thick as he called May an ‘incredible’ woman and said that the relationship between the two countries is ‘the highest level of special’.

    So, what’s the truth? Perhaps the tell came when Trump complained today that the EU was horrible to US farmers thanks to ‘barriers’ which mean they won’t ‘take our farm products’. The common rulebook No 10 is proposing means that farm products that deviate from EU standards, which lots of US ones do, couldn’t be included in a future trade deal. But this shouldn’t come as that much of a surprise given that ahead of the Chequers away day, the papers submitted to ministers explicitly admitted that May’s plans for meant this deal ‘would not allow the UK to accommodate a likely ask from the US in a future trade deal’.

  30. Peter –

    You have no idea what Johnson, Paterson or Rees-Mogg think of food imports. But what does your link say?

    The common rulebook No 10 is proposing means that farm products that deviate from EU standards, which lots of US ones do, couldn’t be included in a future trade deal.

    Oh, I was right then.

  31. It this what the grand idea of your Brexit comes down to: Chickens?

  32. Charles –

    It’s a Project Fear, Remainer scare story. They want us to think that if we leave the EU we’ll all be poisoned by American food. They’re reduced to such nonsense because the idea of being in the EU is intellectually and morally bankrupt. This is all they have.

  33. “‘Sail on, oh ship of state, Sail on, oh union strong and great; Humanity with all its fears, With all the hopes of future years, Is hanging breathless on they fate.’

    and may the chickens be fucked!

  34. You have no idea what Johnson, Paterson or Rees-Mogg think of food imports.

    Pete

    I do. They are all on record as wanting a free trade deal with the USA which abolishes all trade barriers, tariff and non-tariff. Non-tariff is code for standards, so we would have to accept US standards and they would welcome that.

  35. The EU has every right to set food standards. They are sincerely arrived at, and should not be seen as any unfair trade barrier, as some in the US do.

    It you want to sell food to the EU, meet their standards.

  36. Peter,

    The USA is not Somalia. We do have standards. Why not let the British consumer at Tesco decide what to buy?

  37. Pete

    As you know I support Brexit. But it would be much easier to remain in the EU customs union than try to implement the monstrosity that is the Chequers agreement which (apart from the beaurocratic costs imposed on business) is likely to lead to widespread smuggling and criminality. And which will not facilitate free trade agreements with the US or any other country, as you rightly point out. In other words, the worst of all possible worlds.

    And in any case the EU will reject it. After due consideration of course.

  38. Charles

    We have food safety standards in the US, that we would never allow exceptions to.

    The European standards are not the same. To me they have every right to have their own standards.

    Why not tell the US producers to meet the standard if you want to sell to the EU? What’s so hard about that?

    You never heard the Japanese complaining about US standards on cars, etc. They just met them.

  39. Charles

    I’m all for that, provided the food is labelled. If it’s hormone injected beef I have a right to know that before I buy (theoretical as I haven’t eaten meat for over 30 years).

  40. Why not let the British consumer at Tesco decide what to buy?

    WHAAAAAAAT?!

    What kind of cockamamie plan is this, letting people decide for themselves?

  41. It you want to sell food to the EU, meet their standards.

    And there speaks a Brexit headbanger.

    These loons have been saying that when we export to the US, we abide by US rules. And when we export to Japan, we abide by Jap rules. And that when we export to Australia, we abide by Ozzie rules.

    How do they expect that to work?

  42. Phantom, I guess I’m thinking in grand terms about Brexit, to create a U.K. that is free and independent of the EU. Getting bogged down in the muck of where the U.K. is going to buy chicken for instance, infuriates me. The devil is in the details.

    //Why not tell the US producers to meet the standard if you want to sell to the EU? What’s so hard about that?//

    Really nothing. It’s using food standards to derail a Brexit that gets under me skin!

  43. No, I think that countries should be allowed to have their own safety rules.

    The EU didn’t establish those rules to prevent competition from the American farmer.

    The EU is a really huge market. What’s wrong with tailoring some production to meet the customers needs?

  44. My 10pm was to Pete

  45. No, I think that countries should be allowed to have their own safety rules.

    As I said, Phantom, you’re a Brexit headbanger. An “extremist”.

  46. So you think that countries should not be allowed to have their own safety rules

    You are out Junckering Juncker with your control freakery, senor.

  47. The EU didn’t establish those rules to prevent competition from the American farmer.

    I think they did. And our food was good enough for them in 1946!

  48. I think that Pete Moore is the new Bloomberg.

    Him and all his prohibitions.

  49. I, like Pete, prefer a hard Brexit. Damned the chickens, full speed ahead! 🙂

  50. I guess I’m thinking in grand terms about Brexit, to create a U.K. that is free and independent of the EU

    Just to remind you Charles, two of the four constituent states of the UK voted to remain by a much larger margin than that of the Brexit vote. Brexit is tyranny of the masses, in this case the much larger population of little England.

    This puts perspective on why one size doesn’t fit all:

    https://www.independent.co.uk/voices/twelfth-july-northern-ireland-belfast-derry-uk-britain-union-brexit-eu-a8444326.html

  51. Paul, I read the interesting article about the wee six. It does provide a different perspective.

    Northern Ireland is being dragged along, against its wishes, behind the trainwreck that is Brexit, in case they should feel any less British than the rest of the UK.

    It is in their interests that the DUP cling on to the back of the wagon, steering a British prime minister – even as her wheels fall off – not caring for the consequences, so long as we all go over the cliff edge together.

    I didn’t realize that the 12th still evoked violence there. “KAT” for heaven’s sake!

  52. There is an element there, not all on one side by any means, that clings to all past resentments, cherishing them above most everything that is good.

    It devastates the economy, and is a hate crime against the young and all future generations, who ultimately pay the price.

    I believe that an awful lot of the best and brightest move to Dublin and London, while the sullen and angry never leave.

    Is this incorrect?

  53. Those bastards in that video, Paul, deserve to be jailed – full of their own importance, representing nobody and putting innocent people’s lives at risk.

  54. There would be many who know who those skells are.

    They should be dealt with, yes, jailed for a long time – a significant number of years. The individual in question knowingly tried to burn someone to death.

  55. Charles –

    Don’t listen to them. The UK joined (what became) the EU. We had a UK-wide referendum and the people of the UK voted to leave.

    These bleatings come from political seditionists who see Brexit as a way to split up the UK. They’ll fail like they’ve always failed.

  56. Absolutely Noel,

    Atempting to burn a man alive, launching sectarian petrol bomb attacks on the small loyalist Fountain estate of Derry’s Westbank. A bunch of fucking no gooders who represent no one and use the noble cause of Republicanism to mask their own nefarious criminal agenda.

    Meanwhile, things took an even more sinister turn in West Belfast on Friday night:

    https://www.bbc.com/news/amp/uk-northern-ireland-44830392?__twitter_impression=true

    https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2018/jul/14/gerry-adams-home-attacked-explosive-device-sinn-fein-northern-ireland

    Charles,

    Brexit is being imposed on the people of the northern counties against their clearly expressed wishes. Derry city for example is two miles away from it’s natural hinterland of Donegal at the ‘border’. People have families and go to school, live and work in both jurisdictions, likewise with Newry and South Armagh and Dundalk – county Louth. Brexit has the potential to be an absolute nightmare for people around the Irish border, (and a godsend for smugglers).

    I’ve often said here that barring a vague notion of Scot’s independence, (and of course winding Pete and Harri up), if Britain wants to go fair play, cheerio and good luck but the wee six isn’t Britain and in its case one size certainly doesn’t fit all.

  57. Firebombs also thrown at Gerry Adam’s house by the same “dissidents” in Belfast last night.

  58. Charles

    Don’t listen to Pete. He never believed in referendums and did not recognise our 1975 referendum as legitimate. He always believed out membership of the EEC/EU was a treacherous breach of our ancient sovereignty and no-one , people Parliament or Monarch had the right to endorse. That is at least a principled position. Bleating NOW about honouring the result of a referendum is not.

  59. //Derry city for example is two miles away from it’s natural hinterland of Donegal at the ‘border’. People have families and go to school, live and work in both jurisdictions//

    Derry / Foyle voted almost 80 p.c. Remain.

    The results was very diverse across the different constituencies, there were votes of around 75 % for Remain even in parts of Scotland and London.

  60. Newsflash: Derry (sic), Scotland and London are in the UK, and the UK voted to leave the EU.

    We’ve gone through all this before. Please, have some dignity.

  61. //Derry (sic), Scotland and London are in the UK, and the UK voted to leave the EU.//

    Piss off. Derry is in Ireland, and Ireland voted to leave the UK.

  62. Pete loves tyranny of the masses. Its so ‘libertarian’

  63. Pete is a hypocrite as I explained why earlier.

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