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VENEZUELA BOILS OVER

By Pete Moore On January 23rd, 2019

Despite Jeremy Corbyn’s endorsement of Venezuelan socialism, some locals appear to have had enough. The opposition leader, Juan Guaidó, has taken the oath of office and declared himself president. The US has recognised him as interim president, confirming that the CIA and the Pentagon cleared the move first.

Hundreds of thousands of Venezuelans are currently on the streets in protest against the leftist despot Maduro. Or some are rummaging through bins looking for stale crumbs to feast on. Since the UK has no cat in the sack I’d rather that we keep ourselves to ourselves, but that might depend on how much oil interests have been bunging the Tories.

36 Responses to “VENEZUELA BOILS OVER”

  1. Interestingly the new interim President, Juan Guaidó, would also be a “leftist” to most commentators on ATW. His Voluntad Popular would seem to be similar in character to Labour under Tony Blair, and the Democrats under Obama and Clinton.

  2. Venezuela has had one of the most incompetent governments on earth.

    They sit on massive oil deposits, yet have gone backwards at 100 mph over the past decade and more.

    That’s nearly impossible to do, but they found a way.

    Even if a competent government came in now, progress would not be easy. The country has been stripped of so many productive assets, including in the oil industry.

    Oil does not necessarily mean wealth, esp with a government like this.

  3. Venezuela has had one of the most incompetent governments on earth.

    That’s going to change..

    Go Corbo!

  4. The major issue with Venezuela was the over reliance on oil. Firstly Venezuelan oil production has plummeted from 3.3 million barrels per day in 2001 to below 1 million at the end of 2018. Additionally the collapse in the oil price has had a major impact. It is estimated that it costs Venezuela $27 to produce a barrel of oil (compared to for example $9 in Saudi Arabia). At peak prices (in 2008) Venezuela was making about $120 per barrel. They are now making $34 a barrel (and making far less barrels at that).

    It means that Venezuelan oil revenue has gone from nearly $400 million a day to just over $30 million a day, in the space of a decade.

    The failure of Chavez, and his successor, to prioritise government spending on long term wealth creation (infrastructure, education etc…) and instead focusing that money on living standards is what has caused the major collapse in Venezuela.

  5. The trouble with socialism is, the moment it fails, as it always does, the socialists wail, it wasn’t socialist enough.

  6. Hogwash

    There used to be a good private sector in Venezuela

    Chavez etc destroyed the golden goose that they had, robbing Venezuelan and foreign owners.

  7. Phantom.

    Socialism destroyed Venezuela.

  8. Calling Sean Penn….

  9. You’d need to have been a special kind of stupid to think that Chavez or his crowd had one useful thing to say about anything.

    They destroyed all productive assets, and looted other national assets while they did it, giving very discounted oil to fellow failed regime Cuba, even free oil to US causes ( Joe Kennedy ), for publicity.

  10. Sean Penn, like other liberal luvvies need Venezuelan oil to keep their private jets running.

  11. That’s a remarkable video, btw, Phantom. Thanks for posting up.

    Speaking to the comment that Maduro will have to kill the citizens to retain power, here is some food for thought:

    In 2012, Venezuela banned private ownership of guns. Shortly after, the Venezuela homicide rate rose.

    And now…unarmed citizens might get mowed down by Maduro’s govt.

  12. No, that was Pete.

  13. No, that was Pete.

  14. “In 2012, Venezuela banned private ownership of guns. Shortly after, the Venezuela homicide rate rose.”

    That is somewhat of a mischaracterisation. As the economy began to collapse in Venezuela violent crime began to increase. In response to this increase the government banned private guns. It didn’t halt the rise in violent crime – as law in order have largely collapsed in a similar manner to the economy.

    It would be wrong to suggest that the rise in violent crime in Venezuela was caused by the banning of guns.

  15. Maybe the violence began when people were forced to eat their pets.

    (No, not black people in the case of liberals)

    Socialism huh!

  16. A significant number of ordinary citizens would still support that horror of a government.

    They’re unwise, they have made their own poverty so much worse, but there you are.

    Any uprising could be very nasty, since it won’t just be the soldiers they’ll be fighting

  17. “It would be wrong to suggest that the rise in violent crime in Venezuela was caused by the banning of guns”

    This was not my intent. This idea is – with all due respect – idiotic.

    I meant to suggest/say that DESPITE gun control, crime increased and now, BECAUSE of gun control,
    citizens are not armed at a time of great peril, a time where I bet they wished they were armed.

  18. “Any uprising could be very nasty, since it won’t just be the soldiers they’ll be fighting”

    Indeed.

    While the 2018 elections, and the 2017 assembly elections, were a farce – it is worth noting that Maduro won in 2013 in what is broadly accepted as a true reflection of the popular will. And his party, the United Socialist Party of Venezuela (PSUV), lost the 2015 parliamentary elections (the most recent election that was likely fair) but did receive over 40% of the vote.

    So he will likely have substantial popular support (not a majority but substantial support), and any attempt to oust him will likely cause widespread bloodshed on all sides.

  19. They have voted for their own starvation, and nothing will stop them from continuing down that path.

  20. “I meant to suggest/say that DESPITE gun control, crime increased and now, BECAUSE of gun control, citizens are not armed at a time of great peril, a time where I bet they wished they were armed.”

    I think, as per Phantom’s point, an armed citizenry would only increase the bloodshed. An armed citizenry in Venezuela at the moment would effectively create a civil war, with mass killings, as the enraged citizens (on both sides) will have effective means of killing their fellow human being.

  21. Venezuela doesn’t have the stability that is needed to allow for access to guns. It would go from Mad Marx time to Mad Max time.

  22. It’s a shame they can’t defend themselves now, though.

  23. “I think, as per Phantom’s point, an armed citizenry would only increase the bloodshed. An armed citizenry in Venezuela at the moment would effectively create a civil war, with mass killings, as the enraged citizens (on both sides) will have effective means of killing their fellow human being.”

    Yes, better the government starve them to death.

    Or, murder them selectively a la Joseph Stalin.

  24. “Yes, better the government starve them to death.”

    At least 40% of the people support this government. Do you want the supporters of the government to be armed, and willing to use those arms, to defend this government?

  25. I have a manufacturing client, very international, very fair to their employees, good citizen where they do business.

    Venezuela nationalized their factories, and after a struggle paid the company 15% on the dollar in compensation.

    Chavez ran the factory into the ground by staffing it with loyalists who didn’t know anything. All the old workers are unemployed, much of that know- how is gone, and the regime imports what it used to make in Venezuela.

    True.

    That government didn’t make a few mistakes, 99% of what they did was bad. They destroyed that economy very quickly.

  26. I don’t agree with Trump recognizing Guaido as president.

    That is interference with an elected government, horrific as it has been. And I’m not sure that it helps with anything. It will help Maduro style himself as some sort of anti colonialist.

  27. The only democratically elected institution in Venezuela is the National Assembly. They have declared Juan Guaidó as the President of Venezuela. In the absence of a person with greater democratic legitimacy then Juan Guaidó should be regonised as the legitimate president of Venezuela.

    I don’t agree with Trump on much but he’s not wrong on this.

  28. Various neocons, Donald Tusk and Guy Verhofstadt have come out in support of Guaidó. It’s almost enough to make you support Maduro.

  29. Yes, the people will starve, but so what.

    Can’t have neocons happy.

  30. Phantom

    Socialism sucks.

  31. Be cool Phantom. It’s a joke.

  32. But there will be people what will say that and mean it.

    That country is in a deep hole of Chavez’s making.

    Anyone that voted for him owns the starvation, the destitution.

    None of that ever needed to happen.

  33. Venezuelan civil war on the horizon?

    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/24/world/americas/venezuela-news-maduro-russia.html

  34. The US should not intervene

    Neither should the ramshackle oligarch mafia Putinite regime.

  35. Socialism.

    Does it ever end any other way?

  36. I also thought it was good of the Trump Adm. to recognise Guaido.

    Venezuala isn’t only an economic disaster, it’s a also a human-rights catastrophe. The country’s “jails” have become cesspits of torture, extortion and murder, like the worst prisons under the Shah or Saddam. People are arrested and imprisoned without trial, and then tortured, often just so money can be extracted from them.
    It’s hard to see how anyone can support that regime.

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