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BRACE YOURSELVES, IT’S COMING

By Pete Moore On February 8th, 2019

I simply cannot wait to be told by Remainers why it’s a disaster if Belgian communists don’t get to decide how much I am taxed.

71 Responses to “BRACE YOURSELVES, IT’S COMING”

  1. Interesting Pete. The Republic of Ireland’s tax-haven status days are numbered. And the same applies to Holland and Luxemburg.

    Ireland has relied heavily on “EU solidarity” in the Brexit negotiations. But it should not forget that both Germany and France are deeply hostile to its 12.5% corporation tax rate and the many other “tax breaks” which it uses to lure multinational tax-dodgers to its shores. Be sure that this one will run and run, long after Brexit is done and dusted.

  2. Once there is a common taxation policy for all EU members I wonder what economic model will use ? This bearing in mind that the UK will be sourcing its meat and dairy products from cheaper producers I can see why the Irish PM is a little worried.

  3. The Republic of Ireland’s tax-haven status days are numbered. And the same applies to Holland and Luxembourg.

    Perhaps, perhaps not. If and when that’s the case then the Irish people will decide accordingly.

    Mark,

    London based Capital Economics report ‘no deal’ would hit Irish Economy by 1.5% less growth in 2019 and 0.5% in 2020, current ROI growth is over 4%. Agriculture is 4.5% of ROI exports. Yes Ireland would get hit, but could absorb it. Opportunities in ‘no deal’ are enormous too, as one commentator over at Slugger said earlier:

    No one is trying to stop the “too great a force to stop” UK from leaving
    Once the UK is out of the EU, all member states including Ireland will have a duty to their own people to take as much business out of the UK as possible.

    Things will have changed completely and there will be a trade war between the EU and UK for sure if the UK is out of the CU/SM and trying to lower standards to get trade deals with other nations such as the US who want beef standards in the UK to match their own.

    https://sluggerotoole.com/2019/02/07/special-places-in-hell/

  4. The first casualty of a no-deal Brexit will be the UK lamb industry. They export most of their “produce” to the EU and would be faced with a 40% tariff from day one. That would put their lights out in very short order. But sheep may safely graze for now:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B1nyzGR3tUE

  5. I see what you did there Peter. Take yerself away off to Pete’s jukebox.

  6. Cheers Paul!

  7. I follow DG Taxis on Twitter and they have been ramping up the pro qmv propaganda recently…All in vain.

    The brave countries that took pro business tax decisions will veto this nonsense.

  8. Taxud

  9. The brave countries that took pro business tax decisions will veto this nonsense.

    First, they aren’t brave at all, merely stooges of the multinationals leading a race to the bottom and allowing the likes of Google to “suffer” a tax rate of less than 5% on fiddled profits.

    Second, the direction of travel of the EU is clear. A unified company tax rate is a matter of when, not if. This could be part of changes to the Eurozone rules, assuming the Euro survives. If it needs a treaty change they will do that. And if a referendum in Ireland or any other Eurozone state rejects that change they will be instructed to vote again or face expulsion from the single currency.

  10. Brave and visionary. “Stooges of the multinationals” is silly student talk. You’re better than that, Peter.

    It won’t get that far. Ireland isn’t the only EU country with competitive CT rates that will veto this French-driven folly.

  11. “Brave and visionary” is neoliberal bullshit for toadying to multi-nationals in a race to the bottom. Why not offer 0% and be done with it? Then you would be “competitive” with Grand Cayman.

    And the comon tax rate is supported by the Germans as well as the French. They are both seriously pissed-off with Ireland’s shameless tax-haven manouvres.

  12. Not sure about the Germans but its irrelevant. They can piss off as its none of their business.

    And the CT tax take this year suggests the brave, competitive CT rate pays off.

  13. Not sure about the Germans but its irrelevant. They can piss off as its none of their business.

    83 million Germans and 67 million French versus 5 million Irish. Good luck with that. Ask the Greeks what happens to Eurozone states that step out of line. Or the Irish.

  14. //Ask the Greeks what happens to Eurozone states that step out of line. Or the Irish.//

    Funny that you should mention these two nations, Peter. In May we have the EU elections, and despite generally a very low turnout, Greece and Ireland, the places that ATW tells us must be extremely disenchanted with the EU, record two of the highest turnouts among the 27.

  15. Meanwhile in Brexitland:

    “The UK’s Department of Transport has cancelled a contract with shipping company Seaborne to provide extra ferries in the event that the UK leaves the EU without a deal.

    The UK’s Department of Transport said it was clear that Seaborne would not be able to meet its contractual requirements.”

  16. How so?

  17. Phantom.

    And I joke not.

    Because the buffoon (amongst the other 649 buffoons) minister for transport, Chris Grayling , or some other useless post,took out a contract for extra ships in case of a no deal. The problem being the company didn’t actually own any ships?

  18. Transport Secretary Chris Grayling today faced calls to resign after a controversial ferry contract awarded to a firm with no ships as part of no-deal Brexit plans was scrapped.

    https://www.standard.co.uk/news/uk/brexit-news-seaborne-freight-nodeal-ferry-contract-awarded-to-firm-with-no-ships-terminated-a4061996.html

  19. “83 million Germans and 67 million French versus 5 million Irish. Good luck with that. Ask the Greeks what happens to Eurozone states that step out of line. Or the Irish.”

    The Greeks broke the rules and had terms foisted on them (wrongly in my opinion) because they broke the rules. Ireland, blocking changes to tax law, would not be breaking the rules. The two scenarios are different.

    Also it isn’t 83 million Germans and 67 million French versus 5 million Irish. It is 1 German, 1 French, going up against 1 Irishman. And if that 1 Irishman says no then the change doesn’t occur.

  20. The Greeks broke the rules and had terms foisted on them (wrongly in my opinion) because they broke the rules.

    The Greeks elected a government to re-negotiate the terms of the “bail-out”. That election was effectively annulled by the EU, as was a subsequent referendum. But I’m glad that you think that the terms were “wrongly foisted” on the Greeks, i.e. 30% unemployment and a catastrophic recession which has led to untold misery and mass-emigration.

  21. Also it isn’t 83 million Germans and 67 million French versus 5 million Irish. It is 1 German, 1 French, going up against 1 Irishman. And if that 1 Irishman says no then the change doesn’t occur.

    LOL. Watch out for treaty change. Brace yourself, it’s coming.

  22. “Watch out for treaty change.”

    Any treaty change would have to be ratified by referendum in the Republic. So if you are watching out for it you may be watching for a long time.

  23. “The Greeks elected a government to re-negotiate the terms of the “bail-out”. That election was effectively annulled by the EU, as was a subsequent referendum. But I’m glad that you think that the terms were “wrongly foisted” on the Greeks, i.e. 30% unemployment and a catastrophic recession which has led to untold misery and mass-emigration.”

    The Greeks were over a barrel due to their own piss poor choices (some of the Greek spending habits pre crash were ludicrous). They voted for a party to get renegotiate the bailout without any means of doing so. In what manner could they have successfully renegotiated the bailout?

  24. Seamus, O/T question. How is the weather in Ireland the end of September and early October? I’m planning an English/Irish trip for 2020.

  25. Seamus

    It’s clear that you are an unapologetic neoliberal. That means that you suppport globalisation in all its forms, including the Euro. The Euro is biased towards eternal recession. It is effectively a gold standard with no escape. That means less output, higher unemployment and higher emigration for most of its member states, forever, including Ireland.

    Never mind the loss of sovereignty. What is the point of electing a government in Dublin if all the decisions that matter are taken in Berlin or Frankfurt or Paris?

    But you are cool with that, no?

  26. Charles

    Mild and damp. Daytime temperatures c. 12-15 centigrade. Rainfall so-so.

  27. Thanks for that Peter!

  28. I think that September / October can be a great time to visit Ireland and England.

    It’s no longer peak season. and hotels and airfares are often cheaper.

    The weather can be good.

    BTW, in my experience hotel prices in London are well down from what they were two years ago, I believe as a result of Brexit. No telling what they’ll be 20 months from now.

    —Don’t— for the love of God believe the scare stories about London you see here. If you’re interested in traveling there, don’t hesitate, go there.

  29. Phantom

    Thanks for that. We’re planning on taking a 12 day cruise around the isles out of Southampton starting 25 Sept 2020. We’ll visit Cork, Dublin, and Belfast as well as Edinburgh and Le Harve. We love traveling in the cooler weather since we live in Texas! We’ll fly from DFW to LHR nonstop.

    More later.

  30. “Seamus, O/T question. How is the weather in Ireland the end of September and early October? I’m planning an English/Irish trip for 2020.”

    Yeah pretty much what Peter said. The weather can be a bit variable here. The last few years we’ve had a bit of an Indian summer in September/October so its been a bit better. But the standard is not too cold, not too warm (though probably cold compared to Texas), with rain.

    “It’s clear that you are an unapologetic neoliberal.”

    No. Try again.

    “That means that you suppport globalisation in all its forms, including the Euro. The Euro is biased towards eternal recession.”

    No. Try again.

    “Never mind the loss of sovereignty.”

    There is no loss of sovereignty. We’ve been through this before.

    “What is the point of electing a government in Dublin if all the decisions that matter are taken in Berlin or Frankfurt or Paris?”

    One of the most astounding things that has been shown by the entire Brexit process is how little the Brexiteers (of all hues) understand about the internal workings of the European Union. Moronic statement, after moronic statement, after moronic statement.

    You don’t understand the system. And because of that you fear it. Brexit is the true Project Fear. Through in all the lack of knowledge of the EU, with some fear mongering tactics, and good little sheep like yourself have jumped on the bandwagon.

    “But you are cool with that, no?”

    No. Try again.

  31. //What is the point of electing a government in Dublin if all the decisions that matter are taken in Berlin or Frankfurt or Paris?//

    Eh??
    Are you aware of any of the controversies in Irish politics at the moment? Ever heard of Simon Harris? How about the tracker mortgage controversy? Or the cervical cancer scandal? The (lack of) preparations for Brexit? The coming economic storm?

    Now please tell us, Peter, if the decisions on these issues, which certainly “matter” for the Irish people, are made in Berlin or Frankfurt or Paris?

    —–

    Well done, Charles. As Phantom says, don’t believe what the London bashers here say about safety in the city (and when you realise what utter bullshit they talk on that point, I hope you’ll start automatically disbelieving a lot of the other crap they post as well.). My 18-yr-old son has been there about 4 times in the past half year, he travels all over the city on the Tube and his skateboard. He has never even seen any evidence of the dangers that, accordign to the ATW wise men, have taken over London.

    I find May to be the best time in Ireland weather-wise. The last three times I went in May, I came back with sunburn. True.

    Edinburgh is really cool. IMO one of the best situated cities in Europe (but still cannot surpass Salzburg or Innsbruck). A romantic landscape of rocks and valleys comes right into the heart of the city.
    Go into any of the bars along and near the medieval Royal Mile, I recommend the Devil’s Advocate beside the Cathedral. There are also the old dungeons nearby which are worth a visit, and the RM also leads you straight down to the Stottish parliament, which has a wild green view from the windows that must be the envy of lawmakers everywhere.

    Or few better places to spend a few hours in good company than the Bon Vivant in the New Town (it’s just a name, the New Town in Edinburgh is older than the US).

    In Cork visit the English Market, in Belfast visit Seimi.

  32. Horror as man in his 30s dies after his ‘throat was slit with a huge knife when he refused to give man a cigarette’ in upmarket suburb on another night of London bloodshed
    •Man, thought to be in his 30s, was killed on Lordship Lane in East Dulwich today
    •No arrests have been made and police are appealing to public for information
    •Formal identification and a post-mortem examination will take place soon

    She said: ‘Appalled to learn of a fatal stabbing on Lordship Lane during the night. Another family now devastated due to knife crime. This has to stop.’

    The news follows three other separate events in London, a stabbing in Neasden last night and a shooting in Isleworth also last night. The earliest of the incidents was a stabbing during a fight in Hayes, west London.

    The incident, at around 3.47pm on Saturday, saw police arrest four males on suspicion of the attempted murder of a 16-year-old who was found with stab wounds.

    They are a 15-year-old, a 16-year-old and two 18-year-old men. All four were taken to west London police stations where they remain in custody.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6687663/Man-30s-stabbed-death-south-east-London.html

  33. Fatal stabbings reach the highest level since the Second World War

    Fatal stabbings have reached the highest level on record, according to new figures revealing the scale of Britain’s knife crime crisis. The number of young people killed by knives rose by nearly 50pc last year amid a surge of murderous violence, Home Office analysis showed.

    Victims’ campaigners said the numbers were “horrifying” and claimed parents no longer felt safe allowing their children outside after dark.

    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2019/02/07/fatal-stabbings-reach-highest-level-since-second-world-war/

  34. There were 132 homicides in London last year. London has a population of 8,825,000. That means there is 1.5 murders per 100,000 people.

    The United States in its entirety (so not just massive cities but also rural areas etc…) has a homicide rate of 5.4 murders per 100,000 people.

    Charles’ own El Paso had 23 homocides in 2018. It has a projected population of 683,577. Which means it has a homicide rate of 3.7 murders per 100,000 people.

    So if Charles is safe enough in El Paso then I imagine he’ll be grand in London.

  35. Interesting that El Paso has a homicide rate significantly less than the national average.

    Charles, I watched Django Unchained last night. My, is that the tradition such a mild-mannered man like you comes from? 🙂

  36. Charles, take no heed of what the naysayers say. The motivation behind their ‘London is a death zone’ is it’s high ethnic population. IIRC Colm is the only Cockney geeza here who still resides there and AFAIK he hasn’t been raped, stabbed. shot or generally murdered yet. It’s a great city.

    Noel gives good advice regarding Edinburgh above and when in Belfast be sure to make contact with Seimi. A Belfast native will show you hidden places and explain things better than the tens of millions of words that have been written about the city ever could.

  37. El Paso is next to Juarez in Mexico, and the murder rate there is

    https://eu.elpasotimes.com/story/news/local/juarez/2018/06/29/juarez-mexico-border-city-murders-rise-violent-crime-june-2018/743653002/

    There have been more than 160 homicides during a blistering June, compared with about 120 deaths a month ago, according to a running tally by Chanel 44-XHIJ.

    U.S. and Mexican law enforcement officials have said that the violence is due to fighting among drug-dealing groups, drug cartels and a conflict between La Linea and Barrio Azteca crime organizations.

    As I showed a few days ago, the WaPo did a future scenario for the US which was exactly the Juarez situation, so the lefties are aware of what they want to bring to the US. But there is a wall between El Paso and Juarez, and lefties oppose the wall for the border because they know that it works, and keeps the bad people out.

    I cannot get my head round this desire for lefties to import destructive elements into the very countries in which they also live.

  38. Thanks lads. That’s plenty of good advice. I’ll be happy to hook up with as many of our ATW folk that want to meet! It would be grand to meet Seimi in Belfast for instance. I’ll be in Belfast Thursday 1 October, 2020. Plenty of time to talk.

    Charles, I watched Django Unchained last night. My, is that the tradition such a mild-mannered man like you comes from? 🙂

    I’m afraid so Noel! My ancestors owned a few slaves, nothing to write back to Georgia about… :). I would like to think I take after my Irish side!

  39. Charles

    I imagine that your cruise ship will dock at a place not far from where they built the Titanic?

    Guys

    I believe that Harland and Wolff still exists? But that they now do ship repair but not new construction?

  40. Charles

    I imagine that your cruise ship will dock at a place not far from where they built the Titanic?

    So, no need to worry about anything there then?

    😏

  41. Charles

    Nice knowing you 🙂

  42. Women and children last, I say!

  43. Charles is a decent bloke.

    I just can’t see him throwing women and children over his shoulders to get to the lifeboats first.

    That, and he’s not a liberal.

    😏

  44. charlesintexas,

    We’re planning on taking a 12 day cruise around the isles out of Southampton starting 25 Sept 2020. We’ll visit Cork, Dublin, and Belfast as well as Edinburgh and Le Harve. We love traveling in the cooler weather since we live in Texas! We’ll fly from DFW to LHR nonstop.

    Do you stop in Liverpool? (Many cruise ships do these days.)

  45. Dave

    We do stop in Liverpool, Monday 28 September, 2020. I’m not really familiar with Liverpool, and don’t know what to do there!

  46. https://www.ncl.com/cruises/12-day-scotland-england-and-ireland-british-isles-heritage-from-london-southampton-SPIRIT12SOUNWHIVGKWLGRKBFSHLYDUBCOBIPOSOU?embarkationport=4294953355&numberOfGuests=4294953449&state=null&itineraryCode=SPIRIT12SOUNWHIVGKWLGRKBFSHLYDUBCOBIPOSOU

    Is this the cruise line/itinerary?

    Looks great.

  47. Close Phantom, we’re taking the Regal Princess. It’s the same ship that we took to Halifax out of New York.

  48. Charles.

    Do you get to sit at the Captains table?

  49. Harri, I think I run out of money way before then!

  50. charlesintexas

    We do stop in Liverpool, Monday 28 September, 2020. I’m not really familiar with Liverpool, and don’t know what to do there!

    I can’t guarantee anything that far in advance, but if I’m about, I’ll show you the Liverpool landmarks.

  51. Charles.

    No doubt you will hit the bar, followed by the roulette wheel.

    Enjoy your trip my friend.

    I envy you.

    Enjoy every minute.

  52. Thank you Dave, that’s awfully kind of you mate. My wife was telling me that for her, one of the things to look forward to is meeting all my friends from the blog. She hears about them so much, they’re “part of the family!”

  53. No worries mate. I’ve done a few Liverpool tours for my friends in the UK and elsewhere. I think I’m getting good at it. Just let my know what type of things you like to see. Most people want to see the Cavern Club. (Even thought it’s not strictly the original.)

  54. I imagine that your cruise ship will dock at a place not far from where they built the Titanic?

    IIRC cruise ships dock at Donegal quay on the Lagan. Approx a mile up the dock from Queen’s Island, home of the Belfast symbols Samson & Goliath, where the Titanic was built and a short distance from the Titanic Exhibition Centre.

    Dave, Belfast beer summit in August? Seimi and Peter are certs and no doubt we could get Seamus interested and maybe even cajole our host into making an appearance.

  55. Paul, is that where the Stena Line boats dock, or used to? I’d imagine that’s where cruise ships dock in Belfast and it’s quite a bit away from the old shipyards. It’s increadible how close to the city centre H&W was back in 1912, and later. You could see the gantries from all over the city.

    //My wife was telling me that for her, one of the things to look forward to is meeting all my friends from the blog. //

    She actually said that?

    But otherwise she’s ok, right?

  56. Paul

    Dave, Belfast beer summit in August? Seimi and Peter are certs and no doubt we could get Seamus interested and maybe even cajole our host into making an appearance.

    I’d be well up for that mate. But there’s a few things that could potentially stop me that I’d rather discuss with you via Email.

  57. Noel, remember when you said that Americans are friendly in a naive sort of way? That’s us!

  58. Liverpool is on my list of places to visit some day.

    Because of the Beatles, of course, but I’d think there’s a lot more than that.

    Including a lot of Irish history.

  59. //Because of the Beatles, of course, but I’d think there’s a lot more than that. //

    It’s interesting, because you can explore Liverpool to a certain extent through the Beatles.
    It’s history as a major port, the labour movement, the war experience with ferocious bombings and then the arrival of Americans with their music and style. You can go from George’s birth house to the places where John and Paul were brought up and get an idea of the social tensions, or cross over to Ringo’s place and understand a bit better the religious tensions in the city at that time.

    The Beatles of course overcame all these divisions. I don’t know, but I found something a bit melancholic about all these old memories, when you visit Strawberry Fields and Penny Lane. When you walk into the Beatles museum down in the former docks, the first passage is – very appropriatedly – adorned with nothing but black and white pictures of bombings from the war. This is what they were born into (John is actually supposed to have been born during an air raid) and it hits you that all that 60s thing, the colour and music, etc. was a way to escape from the pain and misery of war that must have been very present when they were growing up.

  60. https://www.iwm.org.uk/history/the-liverpool-blitz

    Liverpool experienced its first air raid in August 1940 and was targeted regularly through the autumn of 1940 with 15 raids in September and nine in October. However, the first major raid came on 28-29 November when it was hit by 350 tons of high explosive bombs, 30 land mines and 3,000 incendiaries. Nearly 300 people were killed.

  61. Paul, is that where the Stena Line boats dock, or used to?

    Yeah Noel. Queens Island, (H&W)is easily a good mile over the river and up the quay but on account of the Titanic Exhibition Centre the whole riverside waterfront has been redeveloped and is quite impressive.

    You could see the gantries from all over the city

    As the saying in Belfast goes: If ye can’t see the cranes from yer bedroom window yer a culchie .

    Including a lot of Irish history

    As is wryly said in Belfast Phantom, when the Brits give us back the six counties we’ll give them Liverpool.

    Dave, you can get my mail address from Pat or David.

  62. Got a nice view of the cranes flying out of Belfast City Airport

    They’re right there

  63. Flying out of Belfast City Airport

    Well done on use of its proper name.

  64. Belfast City Airport is much better than the international airport in the arse end of nowhere.

  65. Belfast is a sizeable city which has one airport too many.

    Having two means that neither airport gets the critical mass of flights to compete with Dublin.

  66. Most of the ones up home just use Dublin. It’s 1.5 hours away, mainly by motorway to a modern airport that services most of Europe and beyond. In contrast, Aldergrove, despite being much nearer, is probably over an hour on crappy roads in the middle of nowhere; crap airport with limited flights.

  67. And if you’re going to the US, you of course can clear immigration in Dublin – an incredibly great feature that few airports have. ( Canada, Bermuda also have immigration pre clearance )

  68. Yes, pre-clearance is brilliant. They’d want to improve the food and beverage situation post US immigration though…pretty sparse pickings on that part of “US soil”!

  69. Correct

    There’s nothing there other than cokes, coffees, a pastry or two

  70. Aldergrove is an embarrassment.

  71. I was right about the Germans…this is a French folly.

    https://www.irishtimes.com/business/health-pharma/germany-and-ireland-not-keen-on-eu-tax-proposals-1.3791090