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SEE HOW OUR FRIENDS LOVE US?

By Pete Moore On February 28th, 2019

The Israeli Attorney General intends to indict PM Netanyahu on corruption charges. Meanwhile in Canada, there are calls for Justin Trudeau to resign after the former Justice Minister and Attorney General testified to his corruption, alleging that threats were made against her.

It’s very thoughtful of Israel and Canada, at this difficult time, to go to such lengths to make British politics appear calm and orderly.

13 Responses to “SEE HOW OUR FRIENDS LOVE US?”

  1. There have been rumors against bibi since forever

    Maybe Trump can grab him a pardon 🙂

  2. What a dishonest post.

    There is no comparison between Bibi and Justin Trudeau, except in Rightworld fantasy land. Bibi has been in power and on the take for ten years as Israeli PM and who knows how many years before that. Trudeau has been in power for two years and is not on the take.

  3. Bib’s time has been coming for a long time. Just look at the parties running in April’s election:

    In addition to the left wing parties (Labor and Meretz), the two Arab coalitions (Hadash–Ta’al and Ra’am–Balad), and the two Haredim parties (UTJ and Shas) there are six different parties running (who have chances of getting seats).

    You have Likud, Netanyahu’s party. You have Union of Right-Wing Parties (effectively Jewish Home), largely representing the modern Orthodox people (Settlers) in Israel. In addition you have:

    The New Right: Set up be former Jewish Home MKs who wanted to appeal to more than just modern Orthodox voters. They would have in previous times likely just joined Likud except that Naftali Bennett hates Benjamin Netanyahu (his former boss – Bennett was Netanyahu’s Chief of Staff until 2008).

    Yisrael Beiteinu: Originally a party for Russian-Israelis. As most Russians came to Israel in the 90s and have now largely integrated the appeal of a Russian-Israeli party is a largely depreciating asset. In previous times they would have merged with Likud (the actually looked like they were going to in 2013 but it never happened). The main reason they haven’t merged with Likud is that Avigdor Lieberman hates Benjamin Netanyahu.

    Kulanu: Set up by Moshe Kahlon as de facto Likud lite. The reason that Kahlon left Likud is because he hates Benjamin Netanyahu.

    Blue and White: This is an alliance of four parties.

    The smallest is actually an independent – Gabi Ashkenazi, a former Chief of General Staff of the IDF. He and Netanyahu hate each other because in 2010 Netanyahu wanted an immediate strike on Iran. Ashkenazi was not in favour of it (seeing it as unnecessary militarily – thus relegating to a solely political exercise). As a result the majority of the Cabinet voted against the strike on Iran.

    Then there is Telem, created by Moshe Ya’alon. Similar to Kulanu this is Likud lite. The reason he left is because Ya’alon hates Benjamin Netanyahu.

    Yesh Atid, created by Yair Lapid. Lapid was Minister of Finance, under Netanyahu. The two repeatedly butted heads until Netanyahu fired Lapid in 2014. Since then they have been at complete loggerheads and Lapid has refused to serve in any government led by Netanyahu.

    And Hosen, led, by Benny Gantz, also, similar to Ashkenazi, a former Chief of General Staff of the IDF. In previous times he would have naturally ended up in Likud, where he seems to be largely political similar (maybe on the left wing of Likud but still firmly in the centre-right). There hasn’t really been a public falling out between Gantz and Netanyahu. Likely his decision to lead a new party rather than join Likud was motivated out of a desire to be Prime Minister, rather than any personal animosity between him and Netanyahu.

  4. Yes Seamus, but what matters is that Bibi is corrupt and:

    1. Bibi will not be indicted. The idea that the “independent” attorney-general (appointed by Bibi) will bring corruption charges against Bibi (after a year of “deliberation”) is for the birds.

    2. Bibi will be returned to power at the election this year, at the head of a rag-bag coalition of Zionists and extreme Zionists and even more extreme Zionists. Cheered on by Trump.

    3. The “settlements” will continue to steal land from the Palestinians.

    4. Bibi will continue to push the USA into a war against Iran. Bolton is already signed up and that means that Trump will soon be signed up as well. I suspect that there will be an attack this year, but Trump may delay it until his election campaign is underway in 2020.

  5. 1 is likely dependent on 2. If Bibi is not reelected it is actually hard to see him not face corruption charges. If he is reelected then it becomes more complicated.

    Before the attorney general announced he’d face corruption charges I’d have put his chances of winning at about 50/50. With the charges announced (or the announcement that the attorney general intends to proceed with indictments if we are being technical) I’d say it drops to about 30/70.

    Hadash–Ta’al: 6-11 – Average 7.9
    Ra’am-Balad: 0-6 – Average 3.4
    Meretz: 4-7 – Average 4.3
    Labor: 5-9 – Average 7.6
    Blue & White: 35-36 – Average 35.6
    Kulanu: 0-4 – Average 2.7
    Yisrael Beiteinu: 0-5 – Average 3.9
    Likud: 26-32 – Average 29.8
    New Right: 5-9 – Average 7
    Union of Right Wing Parties: 4-8 – Average 5.9
    Shas: 4-7 – Average 5.3
    UTJ: 6.8 – Average 6-7

    Arabic (Opposition): 7-14 – Average 11.2 (down from 13)
    Left (Opposition): 9-15 – Average 11.9 (down from 29)
    Centrist (Opposition): 35-36 – Average 35.6 (up from 12)
    Centrist (in Government): 0-4 – Average 2.7 (down from 10)
    Right (Opposition): 0-5 – Average 3.9 (down from 5)
    Right (Government): 10-17 – Average 12.9 (up from 8)
    Likud (Government): 26-32 – Average 29.8 (down from 30)
    Haredim (Government): 11-14 – Average 12.1 (down from 13)

    Government: 56-62 – Average 57.4 (down from 61)
    Opposition: 58-64 – Average 62.6 (up from 59)

    And that was before Netanyahu was indicted.

    A Times of Israel poll indicated that should Netanyahu be indicted then the groups would gain and lose the following:

    Arabic (Opposition): -3
    Left (Opposition): +1
    Centrist (Opposition): +8
    Centrist (in Government): +2
    Right (Opposition): -4
    Right (Government): +3
    Likud (Government): -4
    Haredim (Government): -3

    Government: -2
    Opposition: +2

    That would leave averages of:

    Arabic (Opposition): 8.2
    Left (Opposition): 12.9
    Centrist (Opposition): 43.6
    Centrist (in Government): 4.7
    Right (Opposition): 0
    Right (Government): 15.9
    Likud (Government): 25.8
    Haredim (Government): 9.1

    Government: 55.4
    Opposition: 64.6

    In that scenario a coalition between Gantz, the left, and Kulanu have a majority in the Knesset. A coalition between Gantz, Kulanu, the New Right and Union of Right Wing Parties have a majority in the Knesset.

  6. //In that scenario a coalition between Gantz, the left, and Kulanu have a majority in the Knesset. A coalition between Gantz, Kulanu, the New Right and Union of Right Wing Parties have a majority in the Knesset.//

    Does it matter as far as the rest of the world, or the Palestinians, are concerned?

  7. “Does it matter as far as the rest of the world, or the Palestinians, are concerned?”

    Pretty much no. There aren’t really any doves left in Israeli politics. They seem to range from moderate-hawks to hawks to crazy bastards who are going to kill everyone.

    All major parties in Israel (outside of the Arabic ones and Meretz) are anti-Palestinian, pro-settlement, when in doubt shoot them and when that doesn’t work bomb them types.

    Replacing Netanyahu with someone else though may have an impact as Bibi seems to be both personally offended to criticism. He doesn’t take it on board and try to fix it. He just hates people who criticises him. A new leader may be able to start building bridges internationally, and that could have a measured impact on Israeli politics.

    But most likely it will be business as usual as far as the Palestinians are concerned.

  8. //He doesn’t take it on board and try to fix it. He just hates people who criticises him. A new leader may be able to start building bridges internationally//

    I often thought that his general unattractiveness and capacity to attract hatred at home at least keeps him in check somewhat as an Israeli leader.

    I’m not sure about the statistics, but I believe that Netanyahu is probably as good as it gets in terms of robbing Palestinian land, there hasn’t been a massive surge in ethnic clearances that some had feared. AFAIK, the worst years for new settlements were under Labour’s Barak.

  9. In 2007, two years before Netanyahu became Prime Minister again, settlement populations were at 485,000. In 2010, one year after Netanyahu became Prime Minister again, they were at 532,000. At last count, which was 5 years ago in 2014, it was already at 770,000. I can only imagine what it is now.

  10. Peter –

    You have me at a loss. What is dishonest about the post?

  11. The comparison of Bibi with Trudeau.

  12. I don’t think I did that.

    Even so, it still wouldn’t be “a dishonest post”. Let’s not be hysterical all the time.

  13. The Israeli Attorney General intends to indict PM Netanyahu on corruption charges. Meanwhile in Canada, there are calls for Justin Trudeau to resign after the former Justice Minister and Attorney General testified to his corruption, alleging that threats were made against her.

    Most reasonable people would say that statement equates the two as fellow-corruptocrats. But only one has had a cloud of corruption overhanging him for years, and is finally facing charges, and it’s not Trudeau.

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