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IS THIS LEGAL?

By Pete Moore On April 29th, 2019

A US recruitment firm has been accused of racism after posting a job advert stating that it would prefer to hear from white candidates.

So is it legal? If not then it should be. A private firm in a free country should be free to recruit whoever it likes.

(Obviously such rules don’t apply to government and the BBC, which routinely discriminate against British candidates.)

46 Responses to “IS THIS LEGAL?”

  1. IT is illegal and the company admitted it made a mistake.

  2. As the BBC states, In the job description, it said the ideal applicant would be “preferably Caucasian who has good technical background including knowledge of RPA”.

    Obviously stating that the candidate should be white is an error – it didn’t need stating. Somebody who has a good technical background including knowledge of Robotic Process Automation is unlikely to be spic nor groid.

    The BBC also adds that……

    Mr Mayur said Cynet Systems had a policy against advertising for clients who discriminate based on race.

    “We have already begun a review of all currently existing and upcoming ads to ensure no similar issues exist,” he said. “We are also looking at measures that could help us catch offensive or outside-of-policy ads before they ever go live.”

    He added that his firm has two Indian-American owners and a workforce that is “over 60% minority”.

    Read the first paragraph, and read the last paragraph. Clearly having a staff over 60% minority means that whitey has been discriminated against – and as a white, I have no problem with that because I want to do exactly what non-whites are allowed to do.

  3. How free is a ‘free country’? Here is an example of a fat shit of an MP (not joking – just look at him) demanding that the best website in the US be ‘de-linked’…….

    https://twitter.com/vapingheals/status/1121367982800818176

    $1000/mo won’t buy you safety
    ‏ @vapingheals

    The UK Parliament’s Home Affairs Committee just summoned representatives from every major social media company. Their only major and tangible demand: that links to a prominent political website from the USA be removed entirely. How is this not foreign election meddling?

    As is stated below, this website must be very dangerous if it must be disconnected from the entirety of social media…….

    Schwert Schwur
    ‏ @SchwertSchwur
    Apr 25
    Replying to @vapingheals @Czakal

    Which website is it? The Daily Stormer?
    1 reply . 0 retweets 3 likes

    Stormer1
    ‏ @Stormer112
    19h19 hours ago

    Most feared Publication in the World, it seems.
    0 replies . 0 retweets 1 like

  4. British fascists are comical figures, see Oswald Mosley (real), Roderick Spode (fictional) or Pete Moore (somewhere in between).

  5. Abortion is legal for now, but will very likely not be soon, maybe even by the end of this year. A number of cases are making their way towards the Supreme Court:

    ” Kennedy’s retirement gave President Trump the opportunity to appoint a reliably conservative justice, and secure an inbuilt 5-4 conservative majority on the Court. This bodes ill for abortion rights. The five conservative justices on the court are all, to a greater or lesser degree, “originalists” – and they are also all Catholics…

    What might the Supreme Court do now? There will be no shortage of opportunities to rule on abortion: a raft of cases concerning new state restrictions on abortion are working their way up through the lower courts. Any of these might put the issue before the Supreme Court again – indeed this looks imminent at the time of writing, so an indication of the Court’s direction of travel is likely sooner rather than later…

    US conservatives are fond of complaining about “judicial activism”; judges, they argue, should be wary of countermanding the will of the voters and becoming legislators themselves. Yet the two most recently appointed Supreme Court justices – Gorsuch and Kavanaugh – have been appointed by a President, Trump, who won 3 million fewer votes in the Presidential election than his pro-choice Democratic opponent. So whilst the conservative majority on the Court may be tempted to use its new-found power to revoke Roe, the consequence of doing so would be an erosion of the Court’s legitimacy – a risk even justices with strong anti-abortion views may be reluctant to take.

    A less dramatic alternative would be to neuter Roe by allowing state restrictions to a much greater extent than before, either by reinterpreting the “undue burden” test so as to rob it of meaning, or by creating a new test with the same outcome. So whilst the Supreme Court – now in the hands of a group of male, conservative Catholic judges, whose views of abortion are at odds with the majority of their fellow citizens – may shy away from a full-on reversal of Roe, it seems very likely to try to nullify the rights it conferred on women by other less obvious means, so that Constitutional guarantees will be stripped of meaning and the right to choose will be put beyond the reach of many. This is an extraordinarily perverse outcome in a country in which the majority of voters in six out of the last seven Presidential elections preferred a pro-choice candidate, but it is difficult to see how it can now be avoided.”

    https://newhumanist.org.uk/articles/5429/will-the-us-supreme-court-roll-back-abortion-rights

  6. Mahons, on April 30th, 2019 at 12:15 AM Said:
    British fascists are comical figures, see Oswald Mosley (real), Roderick Spode (fictional) or Pete Moore (somewhere in between).

    That’s funny

    Peter, on April 30th, 2019 at 1:33 AM Said:
    Abortion is legal for now, but will very likely not be soon, maybe even by the end of this year.

    and that will never happen

  7. What makes one terrorism, a national story, and Trumps fault. While the other is only mere local news?

    Synagogue shooting: One dead, three injured at Chabad of …
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/nation/2019/04/27/california
    Saturday’s shooting in Poway, about 20 miles north of San Diego, came six months after the massacre at Pittsburgh’s oldest synagogue, Tree of Life, where an armed shooter killed 11 people and …

    Baltimore police: 7 shot, 1 killed at cookouts – sctimes.com
    ‘Very tragic, very cowardly shooting’ at Baltimore cookouts leaves 1 dead, 6 wounded
    St. Cloud Times
    1 day ago · 1 dead, 3 wounded in Passover shooting at synagogue near San Diego; Seven people killed in string of rural Tennessee homicides, authorities confirm … Barbecue grill causes garage fire in St …

  8. 1

    dead, 7 wounded in West Side shooting | WGN-TV
    https://wgntv.com/2013/07/07/1-dead-7-wounded-in-west-side-shooting
    Jul 07, 2013 · 1 dead, 7 wounded in West Side shooting. Posted 5:00 AM, July 7, 2013, … Neighbors said a group of friends were holding an early evening barbeque when someone drove up and began shooting at the …

    don’t know how that got jumbled……

  9. “judges, they argue, should be wary of countermanding the will of the voters and becoming legislators themselves.”

    How is allowing legislators the ability to change legislation with regards to abortion “countermanding the will of the voters”?

  10. ” The five conservative justices on the court are all, to a greater or lesser degree, “originalists” – and they are also all Catholics…”

    They aren’t actually. While Neil Gorsuch was born Catholic he is now an Anglican.

    There are five Catholics on the Supreme Court. The other is Sonia Sotomayor.

    So five Catholics, one Anglican, and three (don’t tell Allan) Jews.

  11. Government thinks it fair to discriminate and its often touted excuse is that there is not enough of (insert here) and would like to hear more from a particular group or groups. On the face of it it seems reasonable but, that is the thin end of the wedge that government uses to justify its actions.

    In truth, no one should be discriminated against for something that was beyond their control at birth. But that said, would you let a blind man fly you somewhere ? In short, there are limitations. But providing those limitations do not reasonably exclude you, why the should you be ?

    Discrimination has now taken on a whole new life on its own. It has gone from prevention to persecution. And if you are male, pale and perhaps even stale, although I am not sure what that means, in today’s ‘society’, you’re screwed !

  12. “And if you are male, pale and perhaps even stale, although I am not sure what that means, in today’s ‘society’, you’re screwed !”

    Yeah because it is toughest in modern day society to be a white man, a section of society still disproportionately employed, higher paid, and commanding the overwhelming majority of the top positions. Must be a struggle for us.

    Ultimately, it depends on the organisation.

    Firstly an lack of diversity (and I don’t just mean in terms of skin colour or gender) can limit an organisation’s ability. To many people hire people who look and sound like them (same gender, race, class, even what university they went to). The result is that many organisations have the same sort of people throughout who all think in pretty much the same way. It leads to group think. So it is in an organisation’s best interest to have a more diverse range of people. So Person A (who is male, white, upper middle class, went to Oxford) maybe, on an individual level, more qualified than Person B (who is not of those traits), but Person B may help the organisation better as they may think differently than many of the other people in the organisation.

    Secondly, and specifically on things like government, and the police especially, if it doesn’t represent the whole people and is dominated by a subset of the people, then it will find its legitimacy questioned. You get a disconnect between the governed and the governing. It is one of the issues that has caused with Brexit. Too many of the decision makers are upper middle class Oxbridge types. So there is a disconnect between them and the people they are governing. It also causes things like Ferguson, Missouri. By all reasonable accounts the actions of the police officer that day were fair and reasonable. However because you had an disproportionately white police force policing a predominately black city there was a real sense in the black community that the police don’t have their back. That the police are what is wrong with the area. That they are not the local community police, but a sort of foreign police imposed on them. And the entire place went to hell because of it.

  13. Wow, Mahons has a great point.

    Me saying that private firms should be free to hire who they like, free from state coercion, totally makes me like a fascist.

  14. and that will never happen

    No Patrick.

    Trump is hoping to campaign next year as the president who overturned Roe v Wade. His rabble-rousing speech on Sunday can only be understood in that context:

    “At a rally in Wisconsin on Sunday, the president repeated the false and explosive claim that mothers and doctors in the US sometimes “execute” new born babies. He has said similar before when discussing late term abortions, those performed after 24 weeks because of a heart-breaking late stage diagnosis of major foetal abnormalities or serious risks to the mother’s health…

    The biggest problem is that Trump’s comments coincide with the rise of an extremist anti-abortion movement that has become increasingly unmoored from any rational, facts-based debate and that has escalated its rhetoric to alarming new levels. Earlier this month, Republican lawmakers in Texas proposed a bill that would have made abortion punishable by death. Like Trump’s execution comment, the message is that the quarter of American women who have abortions, the medical professionals who perform them and, by extension, the politicians and campaigners who support women’s reproductive rights, are baby-killers. And what punishment is fit for a baby-killer?”

    https://www.newstatesman.com/world/north-america/2019/04/why-it-s-so-dangerous-when-trump-describes-abortion-baby-execution

  15. Seamus, on April 30th, 2019 at 12:29 PM Said:

    There are five Catholics on the Supreme Court. The other is Sonia Sotomayor.

    So five Catholics, one Anglican, and three (don’t tell Allan) Jews.

    Seamus – I did know, and the number would have been four jews if Judge Scalia had died during Obama’s time or a Hillary presidency. Jews are 2% of the US population and they are 33% of judges on the SCOTUS: is it ‘anti-semitic’ to point out that fact? Btw the jews vote collectively in favour of the goyim killing their own babies

  16. Yeah because it is toughest in modern day society to be a white man, a section of society still disproportionately employed, higher paid, and commanding the overwhelming majority of the top positions. Must be a struggle for us.

    White men made the world safe enough for whites to have a society. Take a look at Africa: that’s not any society

    noun
    noun: society

    1.
    the aggregate of people living together in a more or less ordered community.

    There is still reasonable order in most of the 1st-world, and that is because of white males. The enormous increase in suicides of white males reflects the loss of technical jobs which provided white males, the most productive sector in human history, with outlets for their creativity and ingenuity which non-jobs like Seamus’s cannot provide. Additionally, the collapse in purchasing power of industrial wages means that those who still work in the dwindling productive sector are unable to provide for a wife and children on the bread-winner’s wages alone.

  17. There is still reasonable order in most of the 1st-world, and that is because of white males. The enormous increase in suicides of white males reflects the loss of technical jobs which provided white males, the most productive sector in human history…

    If, when you speak of ‘white males,’ you use yourself as the example, then I would posit the theory that white males (such as yourself) are dying out simply because you have weak stomachs and no balls…

  18. The enormous increase in suicides of white males reflects the loss of technical jobs which provided white males, the most productive sector in human history…

    There is a serious issue within – suicide, which can take many forms – but Allan’s race focused view distorts it.

    I’d think that suicide, like rape, has long been and remains under-reported.

    A sudden taking of one’s own life is suicide, but IMO so is drinking oneself to death, taking hard drugs until they get you, etc.

    I don’t think that the loss of (highly) technical jobs has caused many to despair. I think that the loss of not so technical jobs ( coal mining, some of the basic jobs in old steel mills that no longer exist due to the highly automated new technology in modern mills ) have contributed to increased use of opioids, say in Kentucky or West Virginia, or vodka in Russia, places where average male life expectancy is actually going down, when average male life span is going up in say New York or Germany.

    This can be the subject of serious conversation, if anyone’s interested – but framing this real problem, like everything else, on race and (( the eternal boogyman )) don’t contribute anything to understanding.

  19. //This can be the subject of serious conversation //

    Yes. IMO, the main causes are increased availability of psych-medication, whether legally or illegally, decrease in religious beliefs and general regional downturns in the economy, jobs etc expecially among the less well educations, who tend to have fewer options and can’t see a way out.

    There have been huge increases in places like India and China (just two days ago a group of 20 Indian students killed themselves when they got poor exam results), in Europe the east is higher than the west, and in the US it seems the more conservative regions (don’t want to make a political point of this) are more affected.

    Scroll for map

    https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-44416727

  20. Yes

    A significant number of these deaths are of people who are financially well off

    And also yes

    US life expectancy, male and female is generally longest in the liberal states, just about all the lowest life expectancy states are very conservative / Republican ( where there is little investment in health care by states )

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_U.S._states_and_territories_by_life_expectancy

  21. yeah because the Liberal States tend not to count these people in their statistics…

    Study finds homelessness at record highs in NYC

    NEW YORK (FOX 5 NY) – A new report gives the city and state an “F” grade for handling the homeless crisis in New York City as the numbers of people in the street continues to reach record numbers.

    The Coalition for the Homeless issued its State of the Homeless 2019 report on Tuesday.

    CONTINUE READING BELOW
    If found that in February 2019, an average of 63,615 men, women, and children slept in New York City shelters each night, just shy of the all-time record set in January.

    http://www.fox5ny.com/news/homelessness-at-record-highs-in-nyc

  22. yeah because the Liberal States tend not to count these people in their statistics

    You made that up.

    You get the Patty award for the day.

  23. Again, average life expectancy

    The variance is astonishingly large. Alabama and West Virginia would be ” government should have little role in health care ” states, and the results speak for themselves. ( other variables are more homicides, more guns, more opioids in those places )

    California 80.5
    New York 80.5

    Alabama and West Virginia 75.4

  24. Excuse me California 80.8

  25. “Jews are 2% of the US population and they are 33% of judges on the SCOTUS: is it ‘anti-semitic’ to point out that fact? “

    It isn’t antisemitic to point it out. It is antisemitic to have a problem with it.

    “The enormous increase in suicides of white males reflects the loss of technical jobs which provided white males, the most productive sector in human history, with outlets for their creativity and ingenuity which non-jobs like Seamus’s cannot provide.”

    The overwhelming majority of the lost jobs were not technical. They were anything but technical. They were any moron can do it type jobs which is why it is much more economically feasible to do it in low wage economies. Actual skilled labour remains. Semi-skilled and unskilled labour has gone.

    And you have no idea what I do in my job so stop bullshitting.

  26. The overwhelming majority of the lost jobs were not technical

    Shipbuilding, mining, merchant naval, fishing, steel-making – these are technical.

    And you have no idea what I do in my job so stop bullshitting.

    What is your job?

    It isn’t antisemitic to point it out. It is antisemitic to have a problem with it.

    2% of the US population has 33% of judges on the highest Court of the land – and it’s NOT a problem to have people in this position whose loyalty is clearly to another people?

  27. So basically everything other than ditch digging is technical so technical has no meaning.

    Steel making and mining are incredibly automated these days.

    When a high school student, I visited the ancient Bethlehem Steel mill in Bethlehem PA. It was a hugely interesting place, with many workers all around.

    Maybe 5 years ago, I visited a huge steel mill in Ontario, Canada. I almost thought that it was closed, there were so few workers around. But it was at full production. There were a few guys in a computer room that were visible, few others.

    Many of the factories of 2019 in high wage countries are very different than the factory you have in your mind.

    Same exact thing in mining.

    Automation is a blessing and a curse.

  28. increased use of opioids, say in Kentucky or West Virginia,

    Oh, come on. We’ve been through that and we know that the Sacklers paid a whole load of doctors to push the poison on locals who had no reason not to trust their doctor….

    https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2017/11/22/meet-sackler-family-making-billions-from-opioid-crisis.aspx

    Additionally, and in the midst of this epidemic of opioid overdose deaths, drug companies are still paying physicians to boost opioid sales by writing more prescriptions. According to a study published in the American Journal of Public Health,34 between August 2013 and December 2015, more than 375,000 non-research opioid-related payments were made to more than 68,000 physicians, totaling in excess of $46 million.

    This amounts to 1 in 12 U.S. physicians collecting money from drug companies producing prescription opioids. The top 1 percent of physicians received nearly 83 percent of the payments, and the drug fentanyl, a synthetic opioid that can be anywhere from 500 to 1,000 percent more potent than morphine, was associated with the highest payments.

    Many of the states struggling with the highest rates of overdose deaths, such as Indiana, Ohio and New Jersey, were also those showing the most opioid-related payments to physicians.

    This suggests there’s a direct link between doctors’ kickbacks and patient addiction rates and deaths. It’s also worth noting that a significant amount of people get their first opioid prescription from their dentist.35 This is particularly true for teenagers and young adults.36 Half of all opioids are also prescribed to people with mental health problems.37

    In a recent episode of 60 Minutes,38 whistleblower Joe Rannazzisi lays the blame for the opioid crisis squarely on the shoulders of the drug industry — especially the drug distributors — and Congress.39,40

    The U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) was well aware of the fact that drug distributors were sending extraordinarily large shipments of opioids — hundreds of millions of pills — to pharmacies across the U.S., and that people were dying from their misuse; yet rather than taking steps to stop the massacre, industry lobbyists and Congress made it virtually impossible for DEA agents to take action.

    With this new information about the Sacklers, we now have a good idea of where the financing came from to facilitate the opioid distribution that Rannazzisi was seeking to shut down. Rannazzisi led the DEA’s Office of Diversion Control, which specifically regulates and investigates the drug industry.

    So there it is: Congress, the most corrupt and debased legislative body on Earth, blocked measures to restrict opioids because of bribery lobbying by the Sacklers.

    Phantom says – the Sacklers are ‘philanthropists’ and cannot be bad people

  29. Steel making and mining are incredibly automated these days

    Yes – these things work in a bubble without local support industries and services. A steelworks may have few people involved in actual production, but the steelworks needs ore, energy, water – all of which are provided by somebody, and accountants, cleaners, IT etc.

    And then when the steelworks is shut, the steel has to be imported from 1000’s of miles away……..yeah, that makes sense

  30. Allan

    You have gobbled too much opioids today

    I have condemned the Sacklers and their company on these pages, in some detail.

    You are one of those who skims without reading or understanding.

  31. Waterworks and electric generating plants don’t need many employees either.

    So steel mills and steel workers are in a bubble also?

    My my.

  32. Phantom – why don’t we just have finance and insurance only? No industry needed, and just provide everybody who used to have jobs with opioids

  33. So steel mills and steel workers are in a bubble also?

    Phantom – I was being sarcastic

  34. You may wish to take a reading comprehension class at the closest remedial education facility.

  35. OK.

    But the way the industry has changed is a huge cause of long term joblessness in many places.

    I spoke of that years ago here, I speak of it now, because it’s still true.

  36. “Shipbuilding, mining, merchant naval, fishing, steel-making – these are technical.”

    Some of it was. Most of it wasn’t. It isn’t technical to dig coal. It is a tough job from the physical point of view. But any moron can do it. There is no skill to it. There is technique to it. Which is why colliers pretty much don’t exist in the western world.

    There are also two different types of steel, broadly speaking (there are many types of steel but for the purposes of conversation lets assign them to two groups). Labour intensive steel and process intensive steel. Labour intensive require very little skill but provides a lot of man hours. Process intensive requires little man hours but a lot of skill. So the fact is that when it comes to labour intensive jobs why would you pay 1,000 Americans $20 an hour to do it when you can pay 1,000 Mexicans, or 1,000 Chinese, or 1,000 Brazilians at substantially lower costs.

    And that has a flip side to it as well. If you pay 1,000 Americans $20 an hour to produce your steel then you have to factor that into the price. You pass that $20 an hour onto your consumers. If you pay 1,000 Mexicans $2 an hour to make the same product then not only can you make more profit but you can do so while passing that saving onto your consumers.

    The nativist approach of banning trade would have the impact of x10 the price of steel that is used in the United States. It would make all the jobs that rely on steel in their day to day non-competitive. That is the impact.

    So yes the 1,000 Americans who lost their job lost their jobs. But thousands of Americans have higher paying jobs now because they are focused on more productive activity, and the inputs of their activity are substantially cheaper.

  37. “But the way the industry has changed is a huge cause of long term joblessness in many places.”

    It is and it isn’t. It is the initial cause but not, in my opinion, the long term cause. The major issue is a lack of adequate education in those areas. It used to be if you got an education then brilliant. You got to go to university and so on and so forth. And if you didn’t then it didn’t really matter. You went down the mine. Or into the shipyard. Or into the steelworks.

    Now the mine, the shipyard and the steelworks are all gone. And the quality of education in many of those places hasn’t improved to replace it.

    A 55 year old steelworker may never get another job. But if the proper structures were put in place by the government then there is no reason his son and his grandson shouldn’t.

  38. Allan

    Please be aware that machines like this exist

    https://www.popsci.com/bagger-288-facts

  39. A friend of mine used to work at the American Stock Exchange, collecting paper slips for trades so that they could all be tabulated manually.

    A lot of people had jobs like that, not so long ago.

    The hectic, in person, floor trading in some stock markets has gone away. Its almost all electronic. There are a few guys on the old trading floor, for show.

  40. I was in the Daimler Benz production works (the Sprinter) on Monday. In one section, a vast hall with these large vehicles passing overhead at various stages of completion, I could see no more than four workers on the factory floor. There were about 16 robots with arms flying around on each section of the line. Sparks were flying around the place, thousands of spots were being welded on each vehicle, with each spot being checked by sensors, polished, then checked again. Automatic cars were running around the aisles carrying parts from place to place and you had to be careful not to be hit by one of them.

    Then in another section, where they fitted in the electronics, wiring etc., there was a suprising number of workers and far fewer robots around. As impressive as the automation was, it still wasn’t as impressive as the coordination and coolness of these workers as they finished each vehicle on the moving line within their tight work cycles.

    I know it makes no sense to say it, but it’d be a terrible tragedy if these jobs were lost too.

  41. Where was the factory?

    I love visiting factories. The best of them are not hectic at all, the embodiment of intelligent planning and coordination.

  42. Some of it was. Most of it wasn’t. It isn’t technical to dig coal. It is a tough job from the physical point of view. But any moron can do it. There is no skill to it. There is technique to it. Which is why colliers pretty much don’t exist in the western world.

    Seamus – do you believe that these workers had no satisfaction and self-esteem from their work? People define themselves by what they do, and doing nothing implies being nothing and being nothing is dreadful for the working class.

    Amazingly, when American construction companies paid American prices for steel, very large buildings were built even paying American wages to American workers. Now, in Africa, wages would be very low, and that must mean according to Seamus, that Wakanda is for real because…….if you pay 1,000 Americans $20 an hour to produce your steel then you have to factor that into the price. You pass that $20 an hour onto your consumers. If you pay 1,000 Africans $1 an hour to make the same product then not only can you make more profit but you can do so while passing that saving onto your consumers.

    Btw, who is ‘you’ and who gets the extra profit for paying people less than Americans – in America?

  43. do you believe that these workers had no satisfaction and self-esteem from their work?

    I’d think that very many did and now do take the most enormous satisfaction from their work.

    But don’t sugar-coat jobs like old fashioned coal mining. It was dirty, backbreaking, dangerous work. Many of those guys developed respiratory problems, as did other miners.

  44. “Btw, who is ‘you’ and who gets the extra profit for paying people less than Americans – in America?”

    Other Americans. The people who profit from owning these factories without having to pay high labour costs. The consumer who can now pay less when they go to the shop. The workers in industries that use steel who now have a job that they would lose if steel was much more expensive.

    ” do you believe that these workers had no satisfaction and self-esteem from their work? “

    They undoubtedly did. Should that factor into the equation? We can pay this guy $20 an hour and bankrupt our country doing it but he’ll feel better about himself so lets do it. Or we can pay this guy $2 an hour and see our country thrive but the guy back home will feel bad about himself so lets not do it.

    “Amazingly, when American construction companies paid American prices for steel, very large buildings were built even paying American wages to American workers.”

    Back when American standard of living was terrible by comparison. Thats the thing all of these things existed in the 1960s. Standard of living, in terms of what we use, consume etc… is substantially more advanced than it was in the 1960s. If you want 1960s jobs then you get 1960s standard of living with it.

  45. In the fifties, there wasn’t much competition from Europe or Asia. There is now

    And I’d say that the profits don’t necessarily go to Americans only. It would go to anyone who invests in the companies that produce or sell goods.

    Ford is a US company, but people from many countries own some of it via stock. Many Americans own a piece of Daimler Benz and Siemens. And all these companies produce goods in both the US and Europe.

  46. The fundamental problem can be simply stated, as Marx did in Das Kapital: Capitalism cannot survive if there are no customers for its products. Marx thought that poverty wages were the problem and they were and still are. But what if no workers are required at all? Who will have the income to buy what the robots produce?

    It’s not just car factories that are being taken over by robots. It’s also care homes in Japan and McDonalds restaurants in South Carolina. If you broaden it to AI it’s also financial services and vast numbers of clerical jobs, including professionals in law and medicine. And if you add in self-driving cars and lorries and taxis….

    For sure there will be other jobs created, maybe even a net gain of jobs and maybe better jobs on average. But we are facing decades of jobs disruption on an unprecedented scale.