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Our Battle Of Britain

By Patrick Van Roy On April 30th, 2019

46 Responses to “Our Battle Of Britain”

  1. Who campaigned to be elected on a core promise they knew they would break

    Labour election manifesto (p.24) 2017

    We will scrap the Conservatives’ Brexit White Paper and replace it with fresh negotiating priorities that have a strong emphasis on retaining the benefits of the Single Market and the Customs Union – which are essential for maintaining industries, jobs and businesses in Britain. Labour will always put jobs and the economy first

    The people who run the European Union are not accountable for anything they do

    The European Council – comprising elected heads of government of EU member countries
    The European Commssion – each EC Commissioner is nominated by their respective EU member country
    The Council of the European Union – one national minister elected to the domestic government of each EU member country
    The European Parliament – directly elected by citizens of EU member countries.

    Pat’s either seriously misinformed or going down the well known Brexiteer route of seriously misinforming the ‘plebs’

    Globalist, open borders agenda

    Make an example of us, grind us underheel

    House of traitors, (Westminster)
    The curse of globalism
    Oligarchic dictatorship like China is today

    That’s only in the first five minutes. A pole of steaming pish.

    No more needs to be said.

  2. Although I find Patrick right on the button in his anti-EU fervour (which I obviously share), I do have grave reservations: Everywhere on the FNM’s comment sections I’m reading comments to the effect of:
    1) The UK “government” has just ignored, or is seeking to ignore the referendum vote, and we’re damned angry!
    2) But just you wait! At the next GE we’ll show them what we think, oh yes! That will show them!
    And I’m just thinking, can you please read point (1) again, and perhaps consider past EU votes in Eire/Italy/Greece and the subsquent events.

    Of course I’ll vote Brexit Party, but I’m under no illusions that the EU will respect that vote, even if it wins a huge overall majority. (See Eire, Greece etc). Dictatorships never respect the vote.

  3. No, there’s a huge road to be trod before we really and truly leave the EU, and it won’t be a matter of voting.
    But at least what I love about this whole sorry debacle is that it’s forcing the EU and those behind it to show their true dictatorial colours far, far sooner than they would have liked. How I would love to shake David Cameron’s hand and thank him (in utter saracstic irony) for his EU referendum, the one he thought he’d so easily win! How they must seethe with goodwill for him in the corridors of the EU now! That gives me such great pleasure to think on it. I’d love to laugh in his stupid liberal face.

  4. Of course I’ll vote Brexit Party, but I’m under no illusions that the EU will respect that vote, even if it wins a huge overall majority. (See Eire, Greece etc). Dictatorships never respect the vote

    What was that about Ireland Brexi?

  5. Here’s what leftists do, and the EU is just one of the organs of the left…..

    https://www.takimag.com/article/eraceing-history/

    Did any Western European leaders have a “conversation” with their constituents about flooding the continent with nonindigenous immigrants? When exactly was that referendum? At least with Brexit, there was a conversation, but has the popular consensus—the result of that conversation—been respected? Of course not.

    Leftists don’t “converse.” They impose. And to do this, it often becomes necessary to erase history, ancient and recent. This is done not only to cow the current generation, but to brainwash the next. “Why, Notre Dame always had a minaret! Hell, the building was constructed by Muslims, who were always the majority in France! Just as England was always nonwhite.”

    Future Europeans will learn little of old Christendom, but you can be damn sure they’ll know all about Auschwitz. In thirty years, every schoolkid in the West will know about the fifty Muslims killed in New Zealand in March 2019, and none will know of the hundreds of Christians killed in Sri Lanka a month later.

    Controlling what we forget and what we remember, what we are encouraged to defile and what we are ordered to hold sacred (like Harlitz-Kern’s holy kazoo), is how you make sure there isn’t a conversation. Leftists understand this better than anyone.

    If Stalin taught these bastards anything, it’s that the airbrush is mightier than the memory.

  6. Paul, if you’re seeking to draw a comparison between the EU’s treatment of nation states and the UK’s historical treatment of Ireland, then I agree with you. I think I’ve said so before in fact. Independence for Ireland. Independence for Britain. I may not have seen things that way when I was younger, but now, seeing my own country under foreign rule, I do see it.

  7. I’m not seeking to do anything Brexi rather than ask what your

    But I’m under no illusions that the EU will respect that vote, even if it wins a huge overall majority. (See Eire, Greece etc).

    Was referring to in the case of Ireland?

  8. Blimey. Is Pat Condell still making videos.

  9. not that often but he puts them out

  10. I love the way people like Brexitannia can plainly and openly repeat such an obvious lie to the extent that they really believe the rubbish they write. Brex continually comments about how the EU has ignored democracy and refused to let the U.K. leave the EU as if it is an undisputed truth when of course the total opposite is true. You are perfectly entitled to want Brexit and to believe strongly that we should leave the EU but not to promote the utter lie that the EU is at fault for Brexit not happening.

  11. “There’s no majority in Parliament for democracy, unfortunately….”

    Well, Pat, then there’s no majority among the British people for democracy either, if you want to see it like that.

    If the Tories and Labour and the LibDems are all Remain, as this loon likes to believe, then British democracy at the last election returned a Remain parliament and will again return a Remain parliament at the next one.

    Condell used to just sound like yet another angry old man; now he looks and sounds like one.

    //but not to promote the utter lie that the EU is at fault for Brexit not happening.//

    Exactly. The EU position now is that the UK should leave.

  12. The U.K. government and Parliament triggered and ratified article 50. Within that official two year period the implementation of leaving or revoking is entirely and solely owned by the U.K. It was the U.K. that asked for the extensions of membership. It isn’t an opinion, it is a simple fact that Brexit is in the hands of the U.K. not the EU.

  13. I love the way people like Brexitannia can plainly and openly repeat such an obvious lie to the extent that they really believe the rubbish they write.

    Colm, when Brexi claimed:

    But I’m under no illusions that the EU will respect that vote, even if it wins a huge overall majority. (See Eire, Greece etc).

    And I asked him what to clarify what he was referring to I suspect that he was trying to promote the hoary old myth that the Irish ‘were made to vote again’ by the EU on the Lisbon Treaty. I’ve corrected this a few times and actually explained this to Brexi himself:

    I don’t see how a post about the potential prosecutions of soldiers involved in the murder of fourteen innocents could be any different from the UK’s Brexit but just to comment on your incorrect ‘The Irish voted, and then were made to vote again on Lisbon, until the “right” vote was obtained’. The Irish rejected Lisbon and the then Taoiseach Brian Cowan went and renegotiated the Treaty with the EU and gained, IIRC, nine amendments before the treaty was put again to the Irish electorate. That’s generally how negotiations in business politics etc are conducted

    http://www.atangledweb.org/?p=77748

    As to the EU ‘ignoring democracy’

    The European Council – comprising elected heads of government of EU member countries
    The European Commssion – each EC Commissioner is nominated by their respective EU member country
    The Council of the European Union – one national minister elected to the domestic government of each EU member country
    The European Parliament – directly elected by citizens of EU member countries.

    Very undemocratic.

    And ‘refusing to let the U.K. leave the EU’

    The EU has

    – Offered EEA status outside the EU to the UK

    – (Reluctantly) offered a WTO no deal clean break

    – Offered the UK membership of the Customs Union outside the UK

    – Offered a bespoke ‘backstop’ solution to the border in Ireland headache

    – Offered to extend the Art 50 implementation timescale in conjunction with the UK indefinitely

    Etc etc.

    The EU has been almost superhumanly patient with the UK.

    I really don’t know if Brexiteers choose to ignore the black & white truth in front of their faces, that the problems with Brexit COME INTERNALLY FROM WITHIN THE UK ELOCTORATE or if they’re so slavishly blinkered to their cause that they just don’t care about facts.

  14. To equate the chaotic unclear bumbling effort of Brexit with the unified heroic Battle of Britain is like comparing one of the Spice Girls to Queen Victoria.

  15. Indeed Mahons. Here’s the elephant in the room regarding the Brexit / Battle of Britain comparison:

    https://www.historic-uk.com/HistoryUK/HistoryofBritain/Polish-Pilots-the-Battle-of-Britain/

  16. Nice catch Paul.

  17. Correct, Paul. You’d never think it from reading ATW, but what the EU wants and is trying for is exactly the same as what the UK government wants and is trying for.

    Also interesting that there is a similar divide (or multiple divides) in Europe as in Britain: some want the UK to remain, some want it to leave under May’s deal and some want it to leave under any terms, even a clean, hard break. The number wanting the UK to remain is albeit not as high as it is in Britain.

    //is like comparing one of the Spice Girls to Queen Victoria.//

    🙂 or Winston Churchill to Nigel Farage.

  18. The only people to blame for Brexit not happening are the English Politicians.

    You elected them and they are laughing at your “democracy”.

  19. The Brexit supporters are also divided in what they want.

    They don’t get off the hook, buster.

    They didn’t think any of this through, including on things like the Irish border, barely mentioned here in the runup to the vote.

  20. You’re correct in the sense that largely it’s England who are to blame for what’s happening in the sense that England is the overwhelming largest constituent part of the UK and that Brexit was largely English driven
    England is still though only one part of the four constituent parts of the UK.

    What is happening at Westminster however is the very essence of Parliamentary Democracy.

  21. Have there been any recent, credible polls as to what the British public want -today-

  22. There was a link posted recently (Noel?) which suggested the pro EU remain vote was now 58%

    I can’t remember how credible the source was though.

  23. //Have there been any recent, credible polls as to what the British public want -today-//

    The most recent I’ve seen, from YouGov 2 weeks ago, didn’t ask the people what they want directly, but asked if they’d been swayed one way or the other by the recent controversy. Strangely, the continuing political mess has changed the minds of very few voters, i.e. by far the majority would vote the same way as they did in 2016.
    The significant difference was that 4 percent of former Remain voters indicated they’d now be prepared to vote the other way if there were a new Referendum, while 7 pc of people who voted Leave in 2016 would be prepared to switch to Remain. (most of those changing towards Remain were in the Labour camp)

    The difference in switchovers between L and R is thus 3 percent, and as Leave won last time by 1.9 pc, it would now be practically a dead heat, with a slight advantage for Remain.

    As regards the other options, only 25 % would like a No Deal exit (again YouGov). Half of all Leave voters would accept that outcome, while the other half would consider it bad or very bad.

    Only 33 pc wanted May’s deal to pass, 38 pc rejected it and 29 pc didn’t know.

    Another YG poll indicates that Farage’s new Brexit party would, at 27 pc, get more votes than any other party in the UK.
    If this continues, the British people and parliament can stop all deliberations – the EU will kick them out!

    https://yougov.co.uk/topics/brexit/all

    https://yougov.co.uk/topics/politics/articles-reports/2019/04/16/most-voters-have-only-become-more-sure-about-their

  24. Hate this entire thing

    No one will be happy with whatever the final result is

  25. Yougov actually presented the options and asked whether it would be a good outcome or a bad outcome. And every single result (ranging from a hard no deal Brexit, to Remaining in the EU, and everything in between), every single result, registered as a bad outcome.

    No Deal: 21% Good, Acceptable 17%, 49% Bad
    May’s Deal: 13% Good, Acceptable 27%, 40% Bad
    Labour’s Plan (SM and CU): 24% Good, Acceptable 26%, 29% Bad
    Remain: 37% Good, Acceptable 9%, 43% Bad

  26. That still shows Labour’s plan (but what IS Labour’s plan?) to be acceptable, especially when don’t knows make up their minds.

  27. I titled it Labour’s plan to be fair. It was listed by YouGov as “Britain leaving the European Union with an alternative deal that included remaining in the single market and customs union”. In the interest of brevity I summed it up as Labour’s plan.

  28. There was another question asked this time by an organisation called YouColm and the result was

    Abandoning Brexit and never mentioning it again: Good 100%, acceptable 0% Bad 0%

  29. Colm, if we could never mention Brexit again imagine how boring ATW would be.

  30. Just in my head I did an ATW poll, the results were Leave 9, Remain 8.
    In my more democratic mind, everyone regardless of nationality would have a vote.

    This result is almost exactly the same proportionally as the result of the 2016 referendum. I was going to say: Great minds think alike, but then looked through some of the names I had down on the Leave side ……

  31. “This result is almost exactly the same proportionally as the result of the 2016 referendum. I was going to say: Great minds think alike, but then looked through some of the names I had down on the Leave side ……”

    You just need to finish the quote. Great minds think alike, though fools seldom differ.

  32. But then looked through some of the names I had down on the Leave side ……

    Naughty Noel 🙂

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/may/01/revealed-populists-more-likely-believe-conspiracy-theories-vaccines?fbclid=IwAR24qLU5GT3Ty5Bw0P6MBEEKZOlHIUQj883–REHV_m5l_rpJV37Wi3se8k

  33. Hate this entire thing

    Imagine how the majority have felt for most of their lives.

    Imagine how you’d feel with your laws made in Buenos Aires, your supreme court in Bogota and most of the Americas given the same rights to live in the US as you have.

    Then imagine how you’d feel being called thick, racist and uneducated for peacefully voting to leave that arrangement.

  34. “Then imagine how you’d feel being called thick, racist and uneducated for peacefully voting to leave that arrangement.”

    If you think the bulk of the UK’s laws are made in Brussels then you are thick and uneducated.

  35. Seamus –

    If you read “most laws” instead of “laws” then you might well be thick and uneducated.

    I don’t know what percentage of primary and secondary legislation, including statutory instruments, derive ultimately from the EU, but it’s substantial.

    You can choose the number. You tell me what the percentage is. Then you can tell me that you’d be happy for that same percentage of laws to be made in London and implemented in the ROI.

    Can’t you?

  36. Oh right, here’s a number.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-eu-referendum-36473105

    If you count all EU regulations, EU-related Acts of Parliament, and EU-related Statutory Instruments, about 62% of laws introduced between 1993 and 2014 that apply in the UK implemented EU obligations.

  37. “Then you can tell me that you’d be happy for that same percentage of laws to be made in London and implemented in the ROI.”

    Noticed you changed it to the Republic of Ireland. I would suggest a similar proportion of Northern Ireland’s laws are made in London as the UK’s laws are made in Brussels.

    “Oh right, here’s a number.”

    I noticed you deleted the section that comes before it. And the one that follows it.

    The first states that:

    According to the House of Commons Library, which itself concedes that there is no completely accurate way to make the calculation, between 1993 and 2014 Parliament passed 945 Acts of which 231 implemented EU obligations of some sort.

    It also passed 33,160 Statutory Instruments, 4,283 of which implemented EU obligations. Add both of these together and divide by the total number of laws passed, and you get the 13% figure.

    13% of laws are EU obligations.

    There are a number of reasons for this. Firstly, some EU regulations, like those governing tobacco and olive oil production, are agreed by all member states but don’t actually affect us at all because we don’t have those industries here.

    We also adopt some EU regulations that simply codify existing UK law at a European level. In other words, we would have that law anyway. But perhaps the biggest way in which it is said the 62% is inflated is because it includes within it what are known as non-legislative EU regulations, which concern matters so small or routine that many people wouldn’t really recognise them as law.

    Here’s a deal Pete. The UK doesn’t interfere in Ireland at all – the entirety of Ireland, not just the Republic of Ireland but Northern Ireland as well. It passes no laws that affect Ireland. It has no say in Irish affairs. And you can then have your Brexit.

  38. You’re actually going to attempt to use the article your quote’s taken from to bolster your argument that, according to that quote, the bulk of laws in the UK between 1993 and 2014 were implementation of EU regulations?

    You embarrass yourself Pete.

  39. Good work, Seamus.

    But Pete’s remark about laws made in London and implemented in Ireland is interesting.

    If, let’s say, the EEC, EU had been the UK’s baby from the start. Imagine conservative British politicians dreamed up the project, flush with victory after WWII and to teach those continentals, devastated by war and dicatatorships etc., the joys of free trade and peaceful coexistence, and Britain had thereafter driven the merger into the current EU, with all the main institutions now based in London. The London Treaty on this convergence and that furher merger.

    I wonder would Ireland have been as eager to join, and would it be as willing to accept the notions of a common foreign policy or common defence etc.

    I’ve a funny feeling bombs would be going off somewhere.

  40. Here’s a deal Pete. The UK doesn’t interfere in Ireland at all

    No no no. The bleatings of the thick, racist, uneducated little Irelander. Afraid and fearful, they imagine they can pull up the drawbridge against the greater union on its doorstep.

    Get over your hateful selves.

  41. Ultimately a big impact of Brexit for the English is that they see their laws being made in Brussels. Those laws for English people will now be made in England. But for Scottish people, Welsh people and people in Northern Ireland those laws will not be coming home as they will also be made in England.

    The Brexiteers have waxed lyrically about the importance of the UK’s common market, the internal market between England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. It is largely underpinned by EU law. The laws on issues related to it are the same in England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.

    In order to allow for easy trade across the UK’s internal borders there needs to be a common rule book, a common rule book that was previously created by the EU and will now be created by Westminster.

  42. “The bleatings of the thick, racist, uneducated little Irelander.”

    I’m neither thick, racist or uneducated. In fact I’m kind of the opposite of all three, much to the consternation of the thick, racist, and uneducated on ATW. And I’m more a young Irelander than a little Irelander.

  43. I wonder would Ireland have been as eager to join, and would it be as willing to accept the notions of a common foreign policy or common defence etc.

    If there had been a centuries old history of occupation, eradication of the indigenous language, attempted genocide of the indigenous population, forced starvation and massive immigration, not to mention the partition of the island of Britain by the EU then Britain in all likelihood probably wouldn’t have been as eager to join either Noel.

  44. I’m neither thick, racist or uneducated.

    Self praise is no praise. Your choices have just unmasked you. Narrow-minded and bigoted too. It’s a big world out there. Don’t close yourself off in your little place.

  45. “Self praise is no praise.”

    I agree. I wasn’t praising myself, just pointing out the stupidity of your comments.

  46. Your choices have just unmasked you. Narrow-minded and bigoted too

    I think it’s what psychologists call projection.