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WELL DONE TO THE POLES AND HUNGARIANS

By Pete Moore On June 26th, 2019

Well fancy that. Governments not deliberately harming the wealth and liberty of the people. If only it would catch on. We note that they defy “an EU bid” for net-zero greenhouse gas emissions (“dismantling the economy”) just days after the radical Left Tories approved the very same trillion-pound disaster here. I suspect that was at the behest of the EU too.

The longer life goes on in the UK, the more inspiring the examples from Warsaw and Budapest.

30 Responses to “WELL DONE TO THE POLES AND HUNGARIANS”

  1. This is unfortunate timing for the fossil-fuel groupies. Most of Europe, including Poland and Hungary are about to experience a taste of what most summers will be like very soon if we continue burning coal.

    “France is starting to close dozens of schools because of a heatwave, with temperatures expected to climb above 40C (104F) in some regions on Thursday…Nearly all of France is now on orange alert – the second-highest warning level after red – with local authorities issuing advice on how to keep cool.

    A Spanish weather forecaster tweeted a map of Spain turning dark red, with the message: “Hell is coming.”

    In the state of Saxony-Anhalt, eastern Germany, speed limits have been imposed on motorways because of the risk of severe heat damaging road surfaces…”

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-48770248

  2. “In the early 2000s, a new field of climate science research emerged that began to explore the human fingerprint on extreme weather, such as floods, heatwaves, droughts and storms. Known as “extreme event attribution”, the field has gained momentum, not only in the science world, but also in the media and public imagination because of the power it has to link the seemingly abstract concept of climate change with our own tangible experiences of the weather.

    Scientists have published more than 230 peer-reviewed studies looking at weather events around the world, from Hurricane Katrina to Russia’s 2010 heatwave. The result is mounting evidence that human activity is raising the risk of some types of extreme weather, especially those linked to heat.

    Carbon Brief’s analysis suggests 68% of all extreme weather events studied to date were made more likely or more severe by human-caused climate change. Heatwaves account for 43% such events, droughts make up 17% and heavy rainfall or floods account for 16%…”

    https://www.carbonbrief.org/mapped-how-climate-change-affects-extreme-weather-around-the-world

  3. Defy the EU? I thought you people said national governments couldn’t do that?

  4. And here are the top 197 climate change lies debunked. You can scroll down and quickly see all the favourites, for example:

    Lie: “It hasn’t warmed since 1998”
    Answer: “Every part of the Earth’s climate system has continued warming since 1998, with 2015 shattering temperature records.”

    Lie: “Antarctica is gaining ice”
    Answer: “Satellites measure Antarctica losing land ice at an accelerating rate.”

    Lie: “Arctic icemelt is a natural cycle”
    Answer “Thick Arctic sea ice is undergoing a rapid retreat.”

    https://skepticalscience.com/argument.php

  5. Nothing to see here, please move along. Eco-loons, natural variability, yada yada yada:

    “National highest-ever temperature records, typically set in late July or August, are likely to be broken across Europe this week as a potentially deadly early summer heatwave sweeps across the continent. Meteorologists expect previous June highs to be approached and possibly exceeded in Austria, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Denmark, France, Germany, Luxembourg, the Netherlands and Switzerland, with all-time records likely to fall in some countries.

    “The latest forecasts leave little room for doubt: we are heading for a new national record,” said Guillaume Woznica, a French forecaster, noting Météo-France was now predicting peaks of 45C (113F) in the southern towns of Nîmes and Carpentras on Friday.

    The highest reliable June temperature previously recorded in France was 41.5C on 21 June 2003. The country’s highest ever temperature, recorded at two separate locations in southern France on 12 August during the same 2003 heatwave, was 44.1C.

    “At our local Potsdam station, operating since 1893, we’re set to break the past June record by about 2C,” tweeted Stefan Rahmstorf, of the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research. Eastern parts of Germany, including Berlin, are already experiencing their hottest June on record.”

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/jun/25/highs-of-45c-expected-in-france-as-heatwave-scorches-europe

  6. Accurate, informative and factual posts Peter. Well said mate.

  7. Poland is like a spoilt child, who joins in a game with the other kids and then makes up his own rules.

  8. Most of Europe, including Poland and Hungary are about to experience a taste of what most summers will be like very soon if we continue burning coal.

    Southerlies are blowing up from the Sahara. Coal did that?

  9. Southerlies are blowing up from the Sahara. Coal did that?

    Coal is deeply implicated in melting the arctic sea ice, both through CO2 greenhouse emissions and soot deposits. The warming arctic ocean has reduced the temperature gradient in the north Atlantic which has in turn had significat effects on the jet stream. The jet stream is behaving much more erratically than even twenty years ago. In particular it is regularly weakening and splitting, with the result that blocking systems can last for weeks rather than days over western Europe. That’s why we had weeks of summer drout last year and why we have had three weeks of cool downpours this month and that’s why we are now getting this African hot air. What would have been freak weather as late as the 1990s is rapidly becoming the norm:

    “The combination of a storm stalled over the Atlantic and high pressure over central Europe would pull very hot air from Africa northward, leading to a “potentially dangerous heatwave over a large portion of western and central Europe”, forecaster AccuWeather said…

    Long-range weather forecasts show summer temperatures throughout July and August are expected to be higher than normal, rivalling those of 2018, which according to the European Environment Agency was one of the three warmest years on record on the continent.

    Scientists have said last year’s heatwave, which led to increased mortality rates, a dramatic decline in crop yields, the shutdown of nuclear power plants and wildfires inside the Arctic Circle, was linked to the climate emergency and that extreme climate events are likely to be regular occurrences in the coming decades.”

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/jun/21/continental-europe-braced-for-potentially-dangerous-heatwave

  10. What would have been freak weather as late as the 1990s is rapidly becoming the norm

    From the Romans to the Middle Ages, vines were cultivated in England.

  11. Pete Moore,

    //From the Romans to the Middle Ages, vines were cultivated in England.//

    The fact that you repeatedly make this statement, shows you understand absolutely nothing about climate change or the science behind it.

  12. The statement is correct. It demonstrates that southern England was once warmer than it is today, long before industrialisation.

    The claims of climate alarmists simply cannot get past the fact that the planet has wildly fluctuated and that it always will. Spurious claims to science remain spurious claims.

  13. Pete Moore.

    I can’t tell if you’re being dishonest, or you really are that uneducated on climate change.

    Here’s the thing Pete. And I know you’re smart enough to understand this. Mankind is producing huge amounts of greenhouse gases. These greenhouse gases warm the planet. I’m assuming that you agree with both of these statements. The planet is warming faster now than at anytime in recent history. (By recent history I mean hundreds of thousands of years.) This is also demonstrably provable.
    Yes the climate has fluctuated in the recent past, but never at the rate that it is changing currently.

    why don’t you read some with Peter’s excellent links.

  14. From the Romans to the Middle Ages, vines were cultivated in England.

    This is lie 27 on the list I posted earlier:

    “One of the most often cited arguments of those skeptical of global warming is that the Medieval Warm Period (800-1400 AD) was as warm as or warmer than today. Using this as proof to say that we cannot be causing current warming is a faulty notion based upon rhetoric rather than science. So what are the holes in this line of thinking?”

    https://skepticalscience.com/medieval-warm-period.htm

  15. Spurious claims to science remain spurious claims.

    Let me translate this: No amount of scientific evidence will ever convince Pete Moore and his fellow-travellers that humans are influencing the climate in any way whatsoever. In fact, the more evidence that is produced the more they will deny the thesis. As Richard Dawkins said, it’s like a Darwinist arguing with a Creationist, which he gave up doing at least twenty years ago.

    It’s called cognitive dissonance syndrome and it is a total waste of ****ing time arguing with these people, simply because they are not open to persuasion by evidence any more than a Creationist is open to the possibility that the earth is more than a few thousand years old and that we are closely related to chimpanzees:

    “In the field of psychology, cognitive dissonance is the mental discomfort (psychological stress) experienced by a person who holds two or more contradictory beliefs, ideas, or values. This discomfort is triggered by a situation in which a person’s belief clashes with new evidence perceived by the person. When confronted with facts that contradict beliefs, ideals, and values, people will try to find a way to resolve the contradiction to reduce their discomfort.”

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cognitive_dissonance

  16. Peter

    //Let me translate this: No amount of scientific evidence will ever convince Pete Moore and his fellow-travellers.//

    Absolutely correct Peter. The fact that Pete Moore and others, constantly repeat the same lies and bad information, even though they’ve been corrected dozens of times shows that they not actually interested in the truth.

  17. Cheers Dave. They produce “alternative facts” as per my link at 7.35pm. These have been comprehensively debunked for years, but they keep coming round, sometimes in slightly disguised versions.

    At 10.16 pm I tried to explain to Pete Moore how coal is implicated in current extreme weather. So he then switches from a “current weather” argument to a medieval warming argument, without attempting to engage with the science of melting arctic ice and its consequences.

    A total ****ing waste of time, and I won’t be wasting any more of mine. Let them cling to their flat earth beliefs.

  18. In order to achieve net-zero CO2 emissions, industry would have to end and people would have to stop breathing so it’s utter nonsense as a basis. Moreover, the atmosphere into which Europeans release CO2 is the same atmosphere into which China releases greater quantities of CO2. The only sensible way to achieve anything in this matter is for Europeans to achieve as realistic as possible reductions, and to impose cost-equivalent tariffs on Chinese products.

    The posturing by Peter and Dave is typical of those who are unaffected by the consequences of what they advocate – for others

  19. Peter –

    It’s actually the truth that vines were cultivated in England in the past. The lie, the propaganda, is the claim in The Guardian that “what would have been freak weather as late as the 1990s is rapidly becoming the norm”. It’s an unscientific claim. There is no freak weather. The planet has been much hotter and much colder, over long periods, literally millions of times.

  20. //It’s actually the truth that vines were cultivated in England in the past. //

    That’s beside the point. Lions also used to roam wild around southern England at one time.

    The question is whether this global warming is unique in its suddenness and whether it’s caused by human behaviour.

  21. Peter and Dave Alton

    If we accept the fact of global warming what do you propose we do about it? What would significantly slow down or reverse the trend of warming?

  22. Noel,
    //The question is whether this global warming is unique in its suddenness and whether it’s caused by human//

    Using the data we have, which goes back hundreds of thousands of years, (possibly 2 million years based on the latest research), The answer to both those questions, is yes.

    https://www.nature.com/news/longest-historic-temperature-record-stretches-back-2-million-years-1.20673

    New Yorker,

    //If we accept the fact of global warming what do you propose we do about it? What would significantly slow down or reverse the trend of warming?//

    Not being a scientist I don’t really have the definitive answer to that question.
    However, reducing our greenhouse gas output would be a good idea.
    How we go about that, is not going to be easy though.
    There is of course the elephant in the room that no one will talk about, which is a massively growing world population using more resources and producing more pollution.

  23. This is another great link on past temperatures from NASA.

    https://www.giss.nasa.gov/research/briefs/schmidt_01/

  24. Dave Alton

    “Not being a scientist I don’t really have the definitive answer to that question.” I am not a scientist either but would like to know what the solution to the problem is. A major problem with the global warming issue is nobody seems to have a good answer to what the solution is other than gradualist measures such as use more public transit and bring your own bag to the shop. I think that is a major reason many people blow off global warming as an issue because it is not clear what the answer is and that is frustrating.

  25. New Yorker,

    //I think that is a major reason many people blow off global warming as an issue because it is not clear what the answer is and that is frustrating.//

    The simple answer is we have to reduce our greenhouse gas emissions.
    However, doing that isn’t a simple process. It’s going to involve more cost and more hassle for most people and sadly, most people are selfish and don’t want any sort of reduction in their standard of living or cost of living. for better to ignore it and just pretend it isn’t happening or it’s all some sort of big lie.

    to be honest New Yorker, it could be too late anyway and mankind is just going to have to bear the consequences of more extreme climate. Which will probably result in flooding, drought, food shortages and wars over resources.

  26. Dave Alton

    There are some ‘big ideas’ a few people are working on such as ways of shading the sun, but whether it would be feasible, I don’t know. It seems to me a ‘big idea’ is what is needed and there should be more discussion and emphasis on that. As you point out, just cutting greenhouse gas emissions may not, maybe will not, be enough.

  27. New Yorker.

    I agree mate.
    My predictions are:
    More nuclear power plants.
    Smaller nuclear power plants appearing on large, commercial sea vessels.
    A rapidly increasing number of electric cars and lorries on the roads.
    Electric public transport. (trains, trams and buses.)

    Of course, I could be wrong.

  28. There is of course the elephant in the room that no one will talk about, which is a massively growing world population using more resources and producing more pollution.

    But the elephant within the elephant is that the growth is entirely due to Africans breeding indiscriminately wherever they can be driven/ferried/flown to.

    https://dilemmaxdotnet.files.wordpress.com/2018/07/world-population-2100-01.jpg

  29. Allan

    //But the elephant within the elephant….//

    Elephant Inception!

    The graph you linked to has Africa’s population rising to 4.5 billion in 85 years. The infrastructure of Africa would have to seriously improve for that to come true.

    If you haven’t seen it already have a look at my link on the Friday night music post.
    I think you might find it interesting Allan.

  30. Dave Alton

    I agree with your predictions. Good idea about nuclear plants on ships. I am for more and more electric vehicles of all types. Hopefully the prices will come down.