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HOMOGENEITY IS OUR STRENGTH

By Pete Moore On June 27th, 2019

French society used be cohesive, trustful and based on shared identity. Only such societies can sustain themselves through the horrors of Verdun, or come back together after half of the country was occupied by the National Socialists while the other half governed by National Socialist puppets. Only natural social glue can bind the parts back together. But something went wrong. So wrong that Macron is going all Bismarckian. My emphasis –

France’s Macron brings back national service

The French government has introduced a plan to bring back national service for all 16-year-olds.

It was an idea put forward by Emmanuel Macron in his presidential campaign, to promote a sense of civic duty and national unity among French youth […]

The goal of this new-style national service, the government says, is to encourage young French citizens to take part in the life of the nation, and promote social cohesion.

Mass immigration has filled the suburbs with people who hate France, will never be French and who spend a lot of time trying to kill French people. French society is now so Balkanised that supposed left-liberals are turning to martial values to instill a sense of Frenchiness. Good luck with that.

Trust and a sense of brotherhood underpin society. That comes from knowing you are the same tribe and the inheritors of the same cultural legacies from the same forebears. “Society” cannot be imposed artificially. It can only evolve organically.

Diversity is national and civilisational death. Enrichment kills trust and fellow feeling.. Homogeneity is our strength.

4 Responses to “HOMOGENEITY IS OUR STRENGTH”

  1. //French society used be cohesive, trustful and based on shared identity. //

    When? Not since the defeat at Waterloo at any rate.

    After that, the Burbon restoration drove a wedge through French society that got deeper and wider as the century progressed, and ultimately led to the collpse of burgeoise values, the Commune, labour unrest and in a way the most exciting movement of art and literature that Europe has seen since the Renaissance.

    The parts came together when France was invaded in 1914, true, but the way that war was conducted made the rift even greater again. By 1940 a lot of conservative France even welcomed the Nazis invasion. They felt that they had been vindicated by the sudden collapse of the French armies before the, as they thought, more virile Germans.

    It could even be argued that the bitterness among the French left, which is at least one factor in the things you complain about, was generated by reactionary France after the Congress of Vienna.

    But you’re right that trust and a sense of brotherhood underpin society and that that cohension is now lacking to a great extent. Let’s hope it doesn’t take another 1914 to bring European societies together again.

  2. Well said Noel.

    The sheer brutality of the Paris Commune in 1871 is mostly forgotten now, at least outside France. But it was a massive bloodletting:

    “In 2012, however, historian Robert Tombs made a new study of the Paris cemetery records and placed the number killed between 6,000 and 7,000, confirming du Camp’s research.[4] Jacques Rougerie, who had earlier accepted the 20,000 figure, wrote in 2014, “the number ten thousand victims seems today the most plausible; it remains an enormous number for the time.”[5]”

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paris_Commune#Casualties

    The generally accepted figure for executions during the Revolutionary terror in 1792 is 17,000.

    https://www.britannica.com/event/Reign-of-Terror

  3. //placed the number killed between 6,000 and 7,000, confirming du Camp’s research.[4] Jacques Rougerie, who had earlier accepted the 20,000 figure, wrote in 2014, “the number ten thousand victims seems today the most plausible; it remains an enormous number for the time.//

    Most of them were murdered in cold blood after surrendering when the Commune had been overrun by the national army. Respectable citizens, including the Parisian ladies with their ivory-handle dress pistols, were invited to come and shoot into the crowd of prisoners, which they gladly did.

    It sort of puts the British reaction to the Easter Rising in persective, with just 16, mostly leaders, executed.

  4. F*** the French