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ENCORE! ENCORE!

By Pete Moore On July 25th, 2019

I never thought I’d say this, but it’s a shame that Parliament has just gone into recess. Boris got his first stint in at the Despatch Box today, whereupon he horsewhipped Jeremy Corbyn to within an inch of his rotten life. One wooden question from the commie, and in seven minutes Boris completely deflates the Labour Party. Great stuff. PMQs will finally be worth catching again. And how good it is to see Rees-Mogg on the front bench too.

40 Responses to “ENCORE! ENCORE!”

  1. //ENCORE! ENCORE!//

    Like Tory in chief reaffirming his commitment to the NHS and claiming that crime is falling in Britain……..? (and that’s only from the 1st minute I watched)

    Well, whatever you’re having yourself.

  2. Make Albion Great Again

    MAGA

  3. Corbyn’s Labour wants to govern for the many, not for the Jew…sorry, Few. Disgusting far-left jealous creep.

  4. It is to see Rees-Mogg on the front bench too

    Hurrah for the global banking elite.

    Crime is down 1/3 from 2010?

    21% decrease in computer misuse,4% decrease in police recorded homicide,3% decrease in burglary. Everything else static or increased:

    https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/crimeandjustice/bulletins/crimeinenglandandwales/yearendingmarch2019

    Disgusting far-left jealous creep

    Better get used to him Brex, he’ll be your new PM at the next GE.

  5. You think that the British are that stupid as to put Labour into office, and Corbyn into 10 Downing St?

    You think that Corbyn is in any way fit to be the political leader of a major country?

    And yes we know that Trump is unfit, we all know that so no need for what about thisery.

  6. Alexander (Johnson MP), it was your party that took us into the then EEC. And it was your party that has kept us still in it months after we should have left.

    But on a brighter note, PM Questions will at last become entertaining, if lacking in any political substance.

  7. Phantom, what makes Corbyn unfit to be PM?

  8. He has referred to his ” friends ” in Hamas and Hezbollah and has said that it was a mistake for the UK government to refer to Hamas as a terrorist organization.

    There are many other things, but IMO this disqualifies him to lead any country.

  9. If he puts forward a hardline socialist manifesto and the U.K. electorate knowingly vote his party into office then he will be entitled to br PM. It’s as simple as that. It will be a big mistake but that’s life.

  10. Opposing Israeli policies is fine by me, but Hamas is a monstrous organization in any decent person’s book.

    Yes, the British electorate has every right to slit their nation’s throat, just as they may have done with the referendum.

  11. Phantom

    Just out of interest, do you distinguish between Hamas And Hezbollah ?

  12. Corbyn’s full comment:

    Tomorrow evening it will be my pleasure and my honour to host an event in parliament where our friends from Hezbollah will be speaking. I have also invited friends from Hamas to come and speak as well. Unfortunately, the Israelis would not allow them to travel here, so it is going to be only friends from Hezbollah. So far as I am concerned, that is absolutely the right function of using parliamentary facilities, to invite people from other parts of the world so that we can promote that peace, that understanding and that dialogue. And the idea that an organisation that is dedicated towards the good of the Palestinian people and bringing about long-term peace and social justice and political justice in the whole region should be labelled as a terrorist organisation by the British government is really a big, big historical mistake

    Incidentally, he adopted a similar approach to Sinn Féin in the eighties and nineties, does that also make him unfit for office? The British electorate at the General Election in 2017 where Labour gained 30 seats didn’t seem to think so.

  13. I think that Hezbollah is bad, and that Hamas is vastly worse.

  14. It’s a big mistake to think that all these groups are the same.

    There are significant differences, which is not to say that any of them are good.

    The dense will at times think that you’re defending the IRA if you say that they’re not Hamas, etc.

  15. I don’t think Corbyn is fit to be Prime Minister. He is however more fit to be so than Johnson. And so if it comes down to an argument of Johnson vs Corbyn then Corbyn is the better choice.

  16. Where are the intelligent leaders?

    Not in the UK, not in the US.

    And in the US, the outlook will be bleak going forward. The Democrat and Republican base don’t want good leaders. Being smart and of a good temperament disqualifies you in the primaries.

  17. I don’t think that Corbyn using Parliamentary resources to debate the Middle East situation with some of its protagonists is sufficient reason to say Corbyn is unfit to be PM and would have thought a similar approach to SF in the eighties and nineties would have been a much bigger bone of contention with the British electorate.

    In terms of a pissing contest between Corbyn and Johnson for me Corbyn wins hands down:

    https://edition.cnn.com/2019/07/23/africa/boris-johnson-africa-intl/index.html

    Although I have to admit to having a bit of a soft spot for Corbyn on his stance with the Irish situation.

    It seems that both the Lab and Cons are almost neck and neck in the opinion polls:

    https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-politics-49043552

    And the results of the next GE is anyone’s guess but ultimately it’s the decision of the electorate in Britain.

  18. Here’s an interesting one to ponder.

    Johnson’s Home Secretary, Priti Patel, was a hard advocate of capital punishment:

    For many years the right-winger was an outspoken defender of capital punishment.

    She told an episode of BBC Question Time in 2011 that it would “act as a deterrent,” even if innocent people were killed.

    “I do think that when we have a criminal justice system that continuously fails in the country and where we have seen murderers and rapists … reoffend and do those crimes again and again I think that’s appalling.

    “On that basis alone I would support the reintroduction of capital punishment to serve as a deterrent.”

    https://inews.co.uk/news/politics/priti-patel-boris-johnson-cabinet-views-death-penalty-immigration/

    She does seem to have subsequently rowed back on the issue:

    After repeated attempts to clarify whether she still backed capital punishment, Patel finally gave a straight answer.

    “The answer is no, I have made that very clear,” she insisted, arguing she had raised human rights issues – including the use of the death penalty – abroad.

    https://www.totalpolitics.com/articles/news/priti-patel-finally-changes-her-mind-death-penalty

    However, last year:

    The high court has heard that the security minister Ben Wallace, the home secretary, Sajid Javid, and the former foreign secretary Boris Johnson, all approved the decision not to seek assurances from the Trump administration that Elsheikh and Kotey would not face the death penalty.

    https://www.theguardian.com/law/2018/oct/09/uk-has-no-legal-obligations-over-isis-suspects-el-shafee-elsheikh-high-court-told

    Post Brexit UK with capital punishment introduced?

    He said moderate nationalists and liberal unionists may question being part of a UK which would potentially bring back the death penalty, in a reference to views previously held by the new British home secretary Priti Patel.

    https://www.irishtimes.com/news/ireland/irish-news/ni-will-question-union-in-event-of-no-deal-brexit-warns-varadkar-1.3968581

  19. Patel being ripped to pieces on the death penalty by Ian Hislop is still one of the best highlights of Question Time.

  20. Phantom, what makes Corbyn unfit to be PM?

    He’s pro-terror, a Marxist and is presiding over a virulently anti-semitic movement. That’s not even to mention his economic policies, which are aimed at replicating the Venezuelan catastrophe.

    If you think that’s fine then just say so.

  21. He praised Castro, who kept Cubans without rights and in rags, and Chavez, who delivered poverty to what had been a fairly rich nation.

    How can anyone who speaks like that be trusted to lead anything?

  22. He has condemned ‘terror’ (including state terror) on many occasions
    He’s a democratic socialist
    The anti semetism which existed has been weaponised by people like yourself into a catch all defintion and almost pales into insignificance with some of the things that the actual Prime Minister has said:
    https://edition.cnn.com/2019/07/23/africa/boris-johnson-africa-intl/index.html
    Your Venezuela comment is hyperbolic bollocks.

    You’re welcome.

  23. Pie, brilliant as usual:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TUx3UjX7h6c

  24. How can anyone who speaks like that be trusted to lead anything?

    For allegedly praising Latin Americans? That’s that settled then.

    Meanwhile Ronald Regan who actually funded right wing terrorist death squads can be trusted with the most powerful position in the world for two terms.

  25. “In Chavez let’s remember someone who stood up, was counted, was inspiring, is inspiring, and in his death we will march on to that better, just, peaceful and hopeful world.”

    Corbyn, on the death of Chavez

    ( NYT this year. Corbyn’s position has not changed )

    MARACAIBO, Venezuela — Zimbabwe’s collapse under Robert Mugabe. The fall of the Soviet Union. Cuba’s disastrous unraveling in the 1990s.

    The crumbling of Venezuela’s economy has now outpaced them all.

    Venezuela’s fall is the single largest economic collapse outside of war in at least 45 years, economists say.

    “It’s really hard to think of a human tragedy of this scale outside civil war,” said Kenneth Rogoff, an economics professor at Harvard University and former chief economist at the International Monetary Fund. “This will be a touchstone of disastrous policies for decades to come.”

  26. Chavez and Maduro destroyed the economy of their nation, Paul.

    Surely even you’ve heard of this.

  27. Did you miss this Phantom?

    For allegedly praising Latin Americans? That’s that settled then.

    Meanwhile Ronald Regan who actually funded right wing terrorist death squads can be trusted with the most powerful position in the world for two terms.

    Between that and allegedly praising people I know which one I think is worse.

  28. I’ve criticized Reagan severely for that, to the discomfort of the local cultists.

    But Corbyn’s buddy destroyed a nation.

    Every discussion doesn’t have to be ” what about this and what about that ” just so you know.

  29. Every discussion doesn’t have to be ” what about this and what about that ” just so you know.

    No Phantom but you seem to think that someone eulogising a dead national leader disbars them from holding office while someone who actually funds right wing terrorist death squads who murdered thousands of innocents is fit to serve the maximum time permitted at the pinnacle of power.

    I know which one I think makes someone more unfit for office.

  30. He praised dead leaders who delivered ruin on a massive scale when they lived.

  31. So that makes him unfit to hold office?

    I think it’s miniscule compared to funding death squads who murdered thousands of innocents and had a habit of mutilating those they didn’t murder.

    I suppose we just see things differently then.

  32. I think both are subject to criticism. If Ronald Reagan was alive today and running for election I wouldn’t vote for him.

  33. Absolutely both are subject to criticism but saying Corbyn is unfit to govern because of something he said about a dead national leader while ignoring these comments by the actual Prime Minister is blind eye folly:

    https://edition.cnn.com/2019/07/23/africa/boris-johnson-africa-intl/index.html

  34. As I said above: I don’t think Corbyn is fit to be Prime Minister. He is however more fit to be so than Johnson. And so if it comes down to an argument of Johnson vs Corbyn then Corbyn is the better choice.

  35. Where are the UK or US leaders or potential leaders?

    Where are they?

  36. Populism sadly seems to be the order of the day. Easier to sell the public a load of old bollocks that can’t be delivered (and then likely blame other people for it not being delivered) than it is to stand on a measured, sensible manifesto.

  37. Populism sadly seems to be the order of the day.

    Dashed oiks and their voting. Up the bankers!

  38. I can live with populism.

    But where is the competence?

  39. There tends to be a disconnect between the two Phantom. Because populism is promising the public fairy stories and make believe promises that can’t be delivered. A competent leader wouldn’t do that.

  40. Up the bankers!

    True enough Pete:

    How good it is to see Rees-Mogg on the front bench too