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PARTY LIKE IT’S 1953

By Pete Moore On July 26th, 2019

As if we needed any reminding that Rees-Mogg is a good’un –

For Rome, defeating Carthage wasn’t enough. It had to be eradicated. They even salted the ruins so that nothing would ever grow there again. So it is with everything Euro. Leaving the EU is not enough. All Napoleonic and radical French influences must be eradicated.

The British Empire, the greatest gift to an undeserving world, was built in inches, feet and yards. If it was good enough for our forebears then it’s good enough for us.

82 Responses to “PARTY LIKE IT’S 1953”

  1. The (Right) Honourable Member for the 18th century.

  2. He would make a good priest in my old school! I can see him tearing a paper up in front of you calling it rubbish.

  3. The British Empire, the greatest gift to an undeserving world, was built in inches, feet and yards. If it was good enough for our forebears then it’s good enough for us.

    As I’m sure you know Pete, much of the British Empire was built on slavery and for most of its history it was ruled by an aristocratic oligarchy. Should we go back to those as well?

  4. Charles –

    Rees-Mogg wouldn’t do that. He’s a good chap, not at all nasty. A sharp and deprecating sense of humour too. At most he’d suggest that the student pay less attention to communists.

  5. As I’m sure you know Pete, much of the British Empire was built on slavery and for most of its history it was ruled by an aristocratic oligarchy. Should we go back to those as well?

    I’m not averse to an aristocratic oligarchy. It beats the left-liberal oligarchy any day.

    But you’ll find that slavery was abolished well before the British Empire was up to full speed. It was finally abolished in England and Wales in 1772 (Somerset v Stewart) and then throughout the Empire in 1833. Our record in these things is not at all bad.

  6. Uppa global banking elite!

  7. But you’ll find that slavery was abolished well before the British Empire was up to full speed. It was finally abolished in England and Wales in 1772 (Somerset v Stewart) and then throughout the Empire in 1833. Our record in these things is not at all bad.

    The British Empire began during the reign of Elizabeth I with the establishment of colonies in North America in 1583 and most historians accept that it ended in 1980 with the independence of Rhodesia-Zimbabwe. By my arithmetic that means that slavery existed for 250 years out of 397 years. And let’s not get into Britain’s support for the Confederate states in the US Civil War 1860-65. Or the many colonial atrocities that happened after slavery was abolished, eg. the Indian “mutiny” of 1857 or the many Indian famines under the Raj, culminating in 1943-45 during which at least two million Indians died.

  8. And of course the Irish Famine of 1845-49 which killed at least one million out of a population of eight million. The potato blight was not due to the empire, but the empire’s response was both tardy and feeble.

  9. Peter

    I would take a longer view. Human slavery has existed for millennia, yet the British Empire stopped the practice I believe in 1833, followed by the Americans in 1866, and the Brazilians in 1883. Not a bad record, with one caveat. The British did transport some 15 million Africans to the Americas, spreading slavery and its aftermath to the New World.

  10. The potato blight was not due to the empire

    An Gorta Mór, (The Great Hunger), was largely a result of Empire economics and land ownersip practices Peter. And while the blight contributed to the human catastrophe it certainly wasn’t the cause.

  11. Peter, in the Empire debit column, you could also list the Opium War in China.

  12. If you removed the potato crop in the 1840s Ireland still grew more than enough food to feed itself. That food was removed and shipped abroad by primarily absentee English landlords. The blight infected the potato crop, the English caused the famine.

  13. Yes Charles, possibly the most shameful act of the British Empire, out of many shameful acts.

  14. Paul and Seamus

    I need to read up on the great famine. I know that the population had almost doubled in about 150 years, mostly based on the potatoes. No-one predicted the catastrophe of 1845.

    But grain continued to be exported when it should have been diverted to famine relief. That was unforgiveable on a humanitarian view, whatever the laissez-faire economics of the time.

  15. Not only grain.

    Ireland was Britain’s bread basket and vegetable garden and was absolutely teeming with fish and wildlife. Unfortunately most of it was based on the estates of absentee landlords.

    As Seamus correctly states above, even with the blight Ireland had ample natural foodstuff resources to feed her population.

  16. All Napoleonic and radical French influences must be eradicated.

    F*** the French!

  17. depends on how you want to look at….. I look at the potato famine as a blessing.

    It forced my people to immigrate to the greatest nation in the world. The Irish flourished in their new home and carved out one of the greatest immigration sagas in american history.

  18. I’m currently reading a book called ‘ The killing of Major Denis Mahon’ a true story about the murder of a landlord in Ireland during the famine. It’s a very interesting but localised read which covers the famine and the evictions and enforced emigration as they impacted an area called strokestown .

  19. Peter

    The government should never interfere with private transactions we are told.

    So the famine probably never happened. It was the original Fake News. No one died, just like no one died at Sandy Hook.

    The free market results in plenty at low prices at all times, so how could a famine ever happen? Its impossible that one could happen.

    So ” famine denial ” should be the new offshoot of the government is always bad brain deads.

  20. Localised stories like that even fictional (don’t know if that is) are great pictures of a time and era….

  21. Patrick

    It wasn’t a blessing at all. Not to the million plus who starved to death in agony. It was only a blessing in the same way that you could call the Holocaust a blessing for catalysing the creation of the state of Israel.

  22. ” It’s all about me “

  23. every great catastrophe has a silver lining and yes Phantom it is always all about me and mine. Who should it be about you and yours?

    And I understand that it was a catastrophe…..

    and 50 years later the other half landed in 1891.

  24. Just think what might have happened if the Great Hunger had never occurred.

    The US would look very different

    Irish may probably be the dominant language in Ireland.

    Pat would be contributing to ATW as a former IRA prisoner.

  25. Patrick’s comment reminds me about the great Muhammad Ali, who was in Africa at the time. He said he was glad his people got on the boat!

  26. supreme court just ruled Trump can use pentagon money for the wall….

  27. Paul McMahon, on July 26th, 2019 at 11:27 PM Said:
    Just think what might have happened if the Great Hunger had never occurred.

    The US would look very different

    Irish may probably be the dominant language in Ireland.

    Pat would be contributing to ATW as a former IRA prisoner

    lol probably right on all counts…..

  28. supreme court just ruled Trump can use pentagon money for the wall….

    Really? It hasn’t hit the news yet.

  29. Brett Baer just said it.

  30. He said he was glad his people got on the boat!

    Ireland isn’t exactly Africa Charles.

    I’ve been to the US twice and for me Irish society is much more preferable.

  31. Mass Irish immigration to the USA in the 1800s was inevitable. It didn’t need the famine to prompt it.

    On a seperate but Trump related matter what is the opinion particularly of Our Trump supporters here of his demands that Sweden release that rap guy who is facing violence charges ?

  32. Colm, Trump can ask for his release, but it’s up to the Swedes.

  33. Charles

    Yes but what is your opinion of Trump’s interference in this case ?

  34. Ireland is a beautiful magical place as is Venice I would love to see both, doubt I will get the chance, but it’s a dream to see the wellsprings of my family.

    As the saying goes we’re all from somewhere….. and we should all be proud of those roots, and I am.

    I am also extremely grateful though that both families had the sense to take the risk and seek their future in America.

  35. Patrick

    The top tier of paddies emigrated to the U.K. it was the second tier who were sent to the USA 😉

  36. Charles

    Yes but what is your opinion of Trump’s interference in this case ?

    Trump has been working closely with the African American community granting pardons, signing the Second Chance Act, meeting with Kayne West, things like that. I recon that this thing with Sweden is also to ingratiate himself with the black community. In a word, domestic politics.

  37. To hell with respecting the Swedish Justice system then Charles. An opportunistic and pathetic suck up to his celebrity buddy Kanye and a patronising insult to the Black community by associating them all with this suspected violent rap star. Way to go POTUS.

  38. Colm, as the great Speaker of the House Tip O’Neill said “All politics is local.”

  39. I look at the potato famine as a blessing. It forced my people to immigrate to the greatest nation in the world.

    At the cost of at least one million lives and unimaginable human misery in Ireland. Never mind the political poison it injected into politics in Ireland and Britain and even the USA for 170 years and counting.

  40. Peter

    Look on the bright side. It ensured that Patrick was brought up on that side of the pond, not ours ! 😉

  41. I look at the potato famine as a blessing. It forced my people to immigrate to the greatest nation in the world.

    If you ever make it to Ireland I’d advise you not to think that aloud Pat. It’d end very very badly for you.

  42. Trump didn’t even know who this ” rapper ” was a month ago.

    Yes, it’s a low cost way of trying to make black people hate himself a little less by interfering in a case in a friendly foreign country.

    I don’t think that any of the real presidents did stuff like that.

  43. I don’t think that any of the real presidents did stuff like that.

    Actually, it sounds a lot like Obama inviting “clock boy” to the White House. Yes, I admit it is a stunt.

  44. Ahh I forgot that

    At least that incident took place in the US

    His lousy family filed lawsuits that went nowhere as I recall.

  45. Actually, it sounds a lot like Obama inviting “clock boy” to the White House

    I don’t think that both cases are even remotely comparable in any way Charles.

  46. They were both un-presidential acts, screwing around.

    As was Obama’s unwise comment about the Professor Gates matter.

  47. Obama inviting a young kid who was arrested and detained because of an engineering project to the WH was a statesman act of humanity.

    Trump demanding that a sovereign nation release an American citizen from lawful custody is the act of a petulant egotist.

  48. Trump has been working closely with the African American community granting pardons, signing the Second Chance Act, meeting with Kayne West, things like that. I recon that this thing with Sweden is also to ingratiate himself with the black community. In a word, domestic politics.

    If the democrat party loses 7% of the black vote they are ineluctable by the numbers.

    It’s called Blexit…. Candace Owen’s campaign.

  49. not electable….

  50. JRM is an eccentric, the stereotypical English Toff, but it must be in the genes. For such an aristocratic family to have remained Catholic since the reformation in the UK despite the travails and loss of power it can only be down to extreme familial doggedness.

    Re his position on the Front bench, I think it’s going to be relatively short lived. The Tories are in election mode and Boris will spend his (the government’s/tax payers money) wat to try and buy it (see what he did as London mayor). Will he be successful, I have my doubts.

  51. wat = way

  52. // instructs his new office to use imperial measurements //

    So he’s forcing his staff to use a system of measurement that makes life much harder?
    What a lovely guy indeed. Mind you, his voting record shows what a nasty piece of work is.

    https://www.theyworkforyou.com/mp/24926/jacob_rees-mogg/north_east_somerset/votes

  53. Thanks for that link Dave, pretty interesting. I found this disturbing:

    Jacob Rees-Mogg voted to remove the duty on the Commission for Equality and Human Rights to work to support the development of a society where people’s ability to achieve their potential is not limited by prejudice or discrimination and there is respect for human rights.

    And this was absolutely disgusting:

    Jacob Rees-Mogg voted against making it illegal to discriminate on the basis of caste

  54. Paul.

    The first time I really paid attention to Rees-Mogg was when I saw him in an interview a few years ago. He really is a nasty piece of work.

    Consistently voted against equal gay rights

    Generally voted against laws to promote equality and human rights

    Voted against allowing terminally ill people to be given assistance to end their life

    Voted against investigations into the Iraq war

    Consistently voted against paying higher benefits over longer periods for those unable to work due to illness or disability

    Consistently voted against removing hereditary peers from the House of Lords

    Consistently voted for mass surveillance of people’s communications and activities

    Generally voted against measures to prevent climate change

    Consistently voted against greater regulation of gambling

  55. The most frustrating thing is that the Labour opposition should be streets ahead in the polls and ready to stop this destructive reckless reactionary govt. from driving us into the pointless unnecessary car crash of a no deal Brexit but because the far left Socialist puritans that now dominate Labours membership insist on keeping the unelectable Corbyn as leader, they are dooming Britain to the continuing dominance of Boris’ s new reckless administration.

  56. He’s a multi millionaire global banking elitist born into a life of vast wealth and privilege who has no concept of the life of the ordinary working man & woman yet Pete loves him because he thinks it winds the lefties up.

  57. //Jacob Rees Mogg instructs his new office to use imperial measurements and refer to “non-tiled males” as Esq//

    How sickeningly modern of him. “Esq” should only be used by men granted a royal position or commission, as the rules well into the 19th C clearly said.

    Enough of this modern commie nonsense. We are now to use the fine title to cover all males, including the rabble. Pooh!

    JRM’s instructions to his staff on use of words and general English are a a bit bizarre.
    His underlings are now forbidden to use the fine word “hopefully” and dozens of others, including “very”, “due to”, “unacceptable”, “equal”, “yourself”, “lot”, “got”, “speculate”, “meet with”, “ascertain” and “disappointment”.
    The idea with “hopefully” presumably is that simple adverbs (which “hopefully” originally was) should not be used to describe a full sentence, as in “Hopefully we shall have your application processed by next week”.

    But other sentential adverbs are common and have been used for centuries. “Happily”, “Luckily”, “Frankly” may have started as simple adverbs (“He explained frankly”) but they have also all been in use in sentential adverbs, including in official contexts, for hundreds of years.

    Insisting on double spaces behind a full stop is also nonsense. The only people I know who do that are Aussies, and of course Pete also doesn’t follow this rule in his posts.

    The world would definitely be a better place if a lot of official language usage was improved. Split infinitives and the use of nouns as verbs (such as “to protest his imprisonment”) are ugly; the latter came from the US, which in turn took it from German. Unbound gerunds or participles are both ugly and wrong.

    But while enthusiasm for nice English is a fine thing, language naturally changes, and it would be silly to try to arrest that growth. Just as examples: “enthusiasm”, “naturally” and “silly” used to have totally different meanings (meaning “possessed by a god”, “through natural instinct” and “useless” respectively), and I doubt if even JRM would want to get back to that.

    This is all just vain posturing as a good-old-fashioned conversvative. I don’t believe Rees Mogg even follows his own instructions.
    BoJo has his particular shtick to mobilise a part of the electorate and JRM has his in an attempt to corner another part. This is what it’s all about.

    I’d say we can expect more of this caper from the new government.

  58. Paul, Colm and Noel.

    Well said guys.

    This really shows that Jacob Rees-Mogg is not living in the real world. Of all the important issues and problems facing the government, he thinks that petty grammar rules and using the Imperial system is important.
    In fact, using the the feet and inches system is a real pain in the ass for everybody and makes calculations for more difficult than using the metric system.

  59. Because the far left Socialist puritans that now dominate Labours membership insist on keeping the unelectable Corbyn as leader, they are dooming Britain to the continuing dominance of Boris’ s new reckless administration

    Colm, Corbyn isn’t a ‘far left socialist puritan’. He’s a democratic socialist in the model of the general politics of the Nordic countries. However, if you feel that strongly you should do what Pete Moore done and pay your Labour three quid membership fee to have the right to vote him in / out.

    Insisting on double spaces behind a full stop is also nonsense.

    A dreadful, nonsensical aberration of punctuation.

    He thinks that petty grammar rules and using the Imperial system is important

    No doubt a dog whistle to those who mistily eyed seek to establish the long dead Empire when by jove those inferiors knew their place.

  60. JRM’s instructions to his staff on use of words and general English are a a bit bizarre.
    His underlings are now forbidden to use the fine word “hopefully” and dozens of others, including “very”, “due to”, “unacceptable”, “equal”, “yourself”, “lot”, “got”, “speculate”, “meet with”, “ascertain” and “disappointment”.

    I don’t know the guy and I really don’t care either way. What I find disgusting is anyone telling anyone else what words another can or can not use……

  61. Yes Pat. Pete Moore used to be vehemently anti nanny state.

  62. Spot on Patrick.

  63. Patrick Van Roy

    F*** the French!

    Surely you mean; vive la France!

  64. The politician sounds like a control freak from hell

    He can and should control messages emanating from his staff But jeez

  65. JRM is simply playing up to the 18th Century toff caricature he has been tagged with. It makes him seem eccentrically harmless rather than the hardline reactionary nasty privileged elitist he really is.

  66. Nail on head Colm.

  67. //JRM is simply playing up to the 18th Century toff caricature he has been tagged with. It makes him seem eccentrically harmless //

    It’s all marketing. Most people relate to a certain kind of countryman, a certain clichee or stage character of themselves. There are certain kinds of Englishmen that many English people are fond of (see the film “Love Actually” for the entire cringeworthy range)

    The BJ model is one type, the JRM model another.

    Each one appeals to different sets of the electorate.

    What they need now is a kind of James Bond type, and then maybe hire Wayne Rooney as a fourth to complete the picture.

  68. Noel

    Perhaps also a Sid James and even a Kenneth Williams ?

  69. Then maybe hire Wayne Rooney as a fourth to complete the picture.

    With his big Irish head on him he’d never pass for an Englishman. Possibly Tom Thug or, if it has to be a Scouser, Paul O’Grady?

    The history and psychology of the single versus dreaded double space:

    https://www.writing-skills.com/one-space-two-full-stop

  70. Colm, Sid James was Saf Afrikan.

  71. Sorry, I meant (((Saf Afrikan)))

  72. Paul

    Yes I know he was but he does represent a certain stereotype of the sexually frustrated leery innuendo obsessed smutty Englishman.

  73. Leery innuendo obsessed smutty Englishman.

    Are London Irish included in that catageory……?

  74. Colm,

    //JRM is simply playing up to the 18th Century toff caricature he has been tagged with. It makes him seem eccentrically harmless rather than the hardline reactionary nasty privileged elitist he really is.//

    Absolutely spot-on mate.

  75. Paul

    I guessed someone would say that 😉

  76. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1irMMs-cBGA

  77. It’s interesting that he directs his staff to use a system of measurements That are different from what his country has used for a long time

    Even And the US, all industrial manufacturers went to metric Decades ago

    If anyone in Mr. Rees Moggs Office were to correspond with a British manufacturer,They Could not use the system of measurements that the manufacturer uses

    Perhaps the Honorable gentleman could ask his staff to only use the English words that were used in the days of the Canterbury tales

  78. ot Phantom…. 3 books in this article you might enjoy

    https://www.nationalreview.com/2019/07/whigs-in-space/

  79. Perhaps the Honorable gentleman could ask his staff to only use the English words that were used in the days of the Canterbury tales

    Verily.

  80. https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=vBa5nN_JyPk

  81. I bet he encourages his staff to use such words as , serf, maid, houseboy, and terms like “lower orders” “ below stairs” and “i’ll have you horsewhipped you impudent peasant “ 😉

  82. I see that some journalist has found 700 cases from Hansard alone of Jacob breaking his own rules of language.

    This is all fur coat and no knickers.