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TO LOONEYVILLE AND BEYOND

By Pete Moore On August 30th, 2019

This is truly the week that the EU jihadists and loony leftists reached escape velocity in their journey from sanity. The Prime Minister doing a normal thing, which is done every year (proroguing the old parliament to allow the new session to begin) has sent them all insane. A highlight has been the idiot’s idea of an intellectual, Stephen Fry, melting down publicly. He tweeted: “Weep for Britain. A sick, cynical brutal and horribly dangerous coup d’état. Children playing with matches, but spitefully not accidentally: gleefully torching an ancient democracy and any tattered shreds of reputation or standing our poor country had left.” What a hysterical drama queen.

We also have one ex-Prime Minister, John Major, suing the current Prime Minister over the proroguing of Parliament. Apparently the normal is unacceptable, but proroguing Parliament to avoid scrutiny of corrupt Tory MPs, as John Major did, is fine. Americans hate being left on the blocks of course. Having seen the Loony Olympics over here they have entered their own champion. Apparently President Trump might murder more people than Hitler, Stalin and Mao combined!

I love how the CNN hosts sit calmly, as if they haven’t just heard an insane commie unmask himself. Then again, this is CNN and every hour is crazy hour on the left. That’s why they keep losing.

3 Responses to “TO LOONEYVILLE AND BEYOND”

  1. We also have one ex-Prime Minister, John Major, suing the current Prime Minister over the proroguing of Parliament. Apparently the normal is unacceptable, but proroguing Parliament to avoid scrutiny of corrupt Tory MPs, as John Major did, is fine.

    Vernon Bogdanor is professor of government at King’s College London. Here is his take on the “coup d’etat” this week:

    “But of course the objection to prorogation has less to do with the time lost than its alleged purpose, frustrating the will of parliament. That the prime minister has unreasonably used his prerogative power to advise the Queen will, no doubt, form the basis of an approach to the courts. Whether that approach succeeds or not, the political dilemma remains: that parliament has willed the end of Brexit without willing the means.

    In 2017, parliament empowered the prime minister to invoke article 50 by the massive majority of 384 votes when MPs passed the European Union (Notification of Withdrawal) Act. But in 2019, the Commons rejected the withdrawal agreement three times. The EU has responded that the agreement cannot be renegotiated. In logic, therefore, the only way to implement Brexit is without a deal. Since every member of the cabinet except for Priti Patel and Theresa Villiers voted at least once for the deal, they can hardly be blamed for the fact that a no-deal Brexit now seems the only logical alternative.

    The Commons, it is often said, is opposed to a no-deal Brexit. But it is also opposed, as shown by its votes, to a second referendum (which it rejected by an absolute majority) and membership of the internal market and the customs union, and it has shown no disposition to revoke article 50. The only positive policy MPs have supported is that embodied in the Brady amendment, calling for the Irish backstop to be replaced with alternative arrangements, something the EU declares it will not countenance. MPs may claim that they are losing vital sitting days in September and October. But they have had three years to come up with an alternative policy. They have failed to do so…”

    https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2019/aug/29/parliament-brexit-prorogue-mps-alternative-no-deal

  2. The gentleman you reference states that CNN is reporting that Trump will kill more people than those other characters. CNN is reporting no such thing. A guy on CNN is making that claim.

  3. If Mark Dice says it it must be true