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SOMEONE’S BLINKING

By Pete Moore On October 11th, 2019

EU countries have agreed to “intensify” Brexit talks with the UK over the next few days.

The development comes after a meeting in Brussels between Brexit Secretary Steve Barclay and EU chief negotiator Michel Barnier, described by both sides as “constructive”.

One of the Irelands is going to get it prison style if there’s a deal. The DUP should be worried, because the Tories are batting for them, and Dublin should be worried because they have the EU in their corner. You can’t think of more dishonest, treacherous friends in either case.

But at least we’ve learned that the withdrawal agreement, which the EU would never, ever re-open has been re-opened. Anyone who has ever bought a car or a house knows that you never deny yourself the right to walk away.

29 Responses to “SOMEONE’S BLINKING”

  1. Like the great Yogi said, it ain’t over until it’s over.

    And like I said, most things are negotiable, and should be.

    Hope you get an agreement that makes everyone happy. I have no idea as to what that might be.

  2. You can’t think of more dishonest, treacherous friends in either case.

    Ain’t that the truth Pete.

  3. If there’s a compromise, it means the EU is scared and surrenders.
    If there’s no compromise, that would be the EU being petulent and intransigent.

    What’s happening is that the UK is now moving closer to the original EU position before it made the generous deal with Theresa May, i.e. a kind of NI-only backstop.

    It’s a scream that the DUPes voted against May’s deal and will for their pains probably be fed by Boris something much more difficult to swallow.

  4. What’s happening is that the UK is now moving closer to the original EU position before it made the generous deal with Theresa May, i.e. a kind of NI-only backstop.

    No-one outside of the talks knows what’s happening. The UK decided to leave the EU. Attempting to annex a part of it is not a generous offer.

  5. Pete, the generous offer I referred to was the opposite – i.e. the May deal, which scrapped the idea of a backstop just for NI in favour of uniform deal for all the UK.

    This was what the British government of the day wanted, and which the EU in the end went along with. What the EU (esp. Ireland) had wanted was a NI-only backstop, which seems to be what the UK and EU are in effect returning to now, although it’ll probably be given some new veneer so as not to be too embarrassing a back-pedal.

    True, no-one knows. But I expected as much when Boris took Leo on a private walk through the greenery in Merseyside a few days ago, and Leo since then declaring “The least said at the moment, the better”. This meeting came just a few hours after Cummings (I think) saying that Varadkar “doesn’t want to negotiate”. That BJ then arranged the meeting and held it in secret (even civil servants and advisers, even secretaries were kept out) definitely suggests that Johnson offered something new.

    At least, RTE is now reporting a NI-only backstop, and various DUPes have been issuing stern warnings.

    RTE is also reporting that the UK has agreed that the consent required from NI would require only a simply majority, and not a “crosscommunity” consensus, i.e. the DUP would have no veto, as the political majority in NI favours as much Remain as possible.

    Yes, that’s against the spirit of the Good Friday Agreement, but not any more than a NIexit would be.

    I wonder if the RoI has much leverage among the opposition in Westminster. If a new deal was worked out and Dublin urged the Br parliament to support it, would that get BJ his majority without DUP support?

  6. It looks like a NI only backstop. It would likely put NI in an economically advantageous position. The DUP might slightly protest it but powerful NI interests will be supportive. Boris might get some Labour votes and assorted non-aligned to pass it in parliament. This night be very good news for NI and it is probably a good thing Stormont is dormant.

  7. So NI would essentially remain inside the EU as respects matters of trade and markets?

  8. that’s what’s proposed….. our host isn’t very happy about it.

  9. Yep, Noel & NY’er seem to be both correct. No one knows what was said nor agreed but if we take the utterances from various media:

    Paul McMahon, on October 11th, 2019 at 3:56 PM Said:

    So let’s see now, the well known Tory organ the Telegraph ran this yesterday:

    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/politics/2019/10/10/northern-ireland-burden-rest-uk-cant-let-get-way-brexit/?fbclid=IwAR14Plc8C1AOrFWUA3yZ4wOWr8Dfn_-jq4CtOXBrYGEXraFxXpL6Wwfkufc

    Johnson comes out with this today:

    https://uk.reuters.com/article/uk-britain-eu-customs-ireland/johnson-declines-to-say-whether-northern-ireland-will-stay-in-eu-customs-union-after-brexit-idUKKBN1WQ1TY

    And then the Telegraph’s Brexit & Euro corrospondent tweets this:

    https://twitter.com/JamesERothwell/status/1182654344388317185

    It would seem that the price of Brexit being the DUP thrown under the bus is an acceptable price to pay?

  10. Screw the political parties

    Is it good for your economy? Could it mean more good jobs for your families?

    If it puts you at an advantage, then seize it.

  11. I think that all the Irish commentators here would be in full agreement with the possible exception of Peter? I wonder what the uber Brexis think though?

    We all also of course remember the accusations of ‘bad faith’ in negotiations.

    Interesting times.

  12. If you would have the economic advantages of being in both the UK and the EU At the same time, which is what this sounds like , I want to hear the arguments against it

  13. You’d need to ask the uber Brexi British unionist nationalists that question.

    Seems like the accusations of ‘bad faith’ negotiations weren’t really that after all.

  14. If I understand this please correct me if I’m wrong. NI is tied to the EU basically the same way as the ROI ?

    yes no ?

  15. Patrick

    Not tied to the EU. Allowed to stay in the EU as they ( both parts of Ireland ) freely wish to.

  16. so the Brits betray NI and the IRA now have their total surrender.

    NI is to be abandoned.

    Everyone who considers themselves British in NI is screwed.

  17. How are they abandoned?

    Most people in northern Ireland voted to stay in the EU

    Allowing them to stay in the EU would be giving the majority of locals what they want

  18. They voted to remain by a substantial margin

    https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-northern-ireland-36614443

  19. Patrick

    As Phantom pointed out, the majority of N.I. voters want to remain in the EU. It makes far more sense in every way for the whole of Ireland to remain economically aligned as one territory. N.I. remains part of the U.K. it still elects MPs to Westminster , nobody is being sold out. This is common sense, good economic sense and overwhelmingly popular amongst both territories. What’s not to like ?

  20. //Is it good for your economy? Could it mean more good jobs for your families?
    If it puts you at an advantage, then seize it.//

    Then why Brexit?

    That’s a change from you, Phantom. You were the one, (well the two, along with Pete Moore) who had always been saying that there are some things more important than economic interests, etc.

    Now it looks like that’s not the case when it comes to Northern Ireland. 🙁

    The DUP opposition is a bit phoney, and obviously meant more for the electorate than based on any principled position. They have always been the “Ulster first” of the two Unionist parties, whereas the UUP was the more unionist in the purer sense.

    And far from having the horrors at the thought of different treatment for NI; the DUP has also always favoured special legislation, exemptions etc for the North, of which there are many in place, when it suited them.

  21. If the rumours are true, this is a wonderful deal for NI economically – getting its cake and eating it whilst respecting the pro-remain majority and the (current) constitutional arrangement.

    The only opposition will come from the DUP, who are idiots…and it will be interesting to see how other WTO members react. How can you have an independent UK customs territory but have tariffs for one part of your customs territory determined by a separate customs union which has duty free access to both…and the UK as a whole be allowed to negotiate its own FTAs. All sorts of legal hoops to jump through there…

  22. So the Brits betray NI and the IRA now have their total surrender.

    NI is to be abandoned.

    Everyone who considers themselves British in NI is screwed

    Interesting how Pat equates Brexit with conflict?

    Pat, I know a number of former IRA prisoners who voted for Brexit because of the chaos it would unleash on British politics and put Ireland on top of the agenda. They were absolutely correct.

    Let me also remind you that a sizeable unionist contingent in the North also voted to stay.

  23. Patrick has said in the past he tends to avoid commenting on Northern Ireland as he isn’t well informed on it. Perhaps he should revisit his own wise self advice 😉

  24. As Phantom pointed out, the majority of N.I. voters want to remain in the EU. It makes far more sense in every way for the whole of Ireland to remain economically aligned as one territory. N.I. remains part of the U.K. it still elects MPs to Westminster , nobody is being sold out. This is common sense, good economic sense and overwhelmingly popular amongst both territories. What’s not to like ?

    Everything.

    NI isn’t in the EU. The UK is in the EU and the UK decided to leave it.

    The Belfast Agreement is quite clear that NI is a sovereign territory of the UK. If you want Loyalist headbangers to come out of the woodwork then by all means just tear up the Belfast Agreement.

    Let’s be honest, it would be easier both economically and culturally for the ROI to come back to the UK. The EU cannot run forever from its contradictions. When it collapses the ROI will look to the UK as a battered sailor yearns for a safe harbour.

    This was always the sensible way to avoid a backstop.

  25. https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-northern-ireland-50021018

    I foresee a visit by Liz Windsor to the wee six.

    It’s a pity for Arlene that the taks are conducted between states and not leaders of minority parties in closed regional assemblies. Oh well, if she feels important.. so be it.

  26. The Belfast Agreement is quite clear that NI is a sovereign territory of the UK

    Pete, how will Strand Two of the BA be affected by Brexit? Will the North–South Ministerial Council and the North–South cross-border Implementation Bodies stil function and will you be happy with an EU member state having a say in the governance of the wee six?

    If you want Loyalist headbangers to come out of the woodwork then by all means just tear up the Belfast Agreement.

    Threatening violence? So they weren’t just reactive to IRA violence, as we were told for decades, after all?

  27. I see Pete is in joker mood today 😀

  28. The DUP and Pete Moore need to learn how to dine on crow silently.

  29. They will have to learn to eat humble pie first…:)

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