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DOWN BY THE RIVER

By Pete Moore On November 29th, 2019

A lovely late-Autumn day in Blighty. Sparkling sunshine and overnight frosts is how it should be. Even London can still put on a show. Fishmongers’ Hall was looking splendid in the glow. What a magnificent view as you walk north across London Bridge to the City. (Just pretend you can’t see the execrable Wells Fargo building peeking out from behind.)

Don’t worry about the chap with a knife. He’s just a member of the public, what’s known as a “first responder” when the need arises. In other news, I hear that a council flat has just become available.

47 Responses to “DOWN BY THE RIVER”

  1. Come on Pete, your slipping. I was expecting an ‘exclusive’ from you that he was a Corbyn supporting eco activist Remainer 😉,

  2. Colm –

    The fake suicide vest suggests he’s a different type of Corbyn voter, and that Labour just lost 50 votes from one address. But we’ll see.

  3. What exactly is known about the perpetrator

  4. No details released yet, Phantom.

  5. I think that your Press is slower to release details than the US press would be. For legal reasons

  6. I sympathise. If I was in charge I’d check 10 times that what we say is correct before it goes out. As long as we get the pertinent details there’s no rush.

  7. Most right-wing extreme patriot terror plots are disrupted well in advance, they’re a bit thick communicating on social media , hyping up anti-commie pro-nazi comments.
    Easy to spot and find . The oldies tend to be dis-grunted old men, who egg on the ignorant Nazi Nic’s to make the attacks,
    the mad mozzie’s attacks are often random, as this appears to be. They do this after prayers on Friday !! the scumbags
    So yeah we have 2 groups in this country who wants to harm us .
    We can’t afford innocent lives being blown up – Shoot to kill !

  8. There was the incident where the woman was pushed by a jogger Towards a bus

    There was a false arrest of an American, And much biased talk about bankers etc.

    Were there ever any further developments in that case

  9. Phantom

    I don’t think they ever found the genuine culprit in that incident.

  10. https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-44639208

    A police investigation to find a jogger who pushed a woman into the path of a bus on a bridge in London has been closed.

    The search was launched in August 2017 when CCTV footage was released of a bus driver swerving to avoid the woman on Putney Bridge, south west London.

    Officers looked at more than 50 suspects and arrested three men, who were all released without charge.

    The Met Police said all lines of enquiry had now been “exhausted”.

  11. Even with camera footage, sometimes you just don’t know

    A bad guy got lucky

  12. I bet this guy stopped running forever that same day

  13. The CCTV is clear-ish. I wouldn’t be surprised if there’s an arrest one day.

  14. fair play to the londoners today who acted with valour eh, don’t mess with us u wannabe killers

  15. The perp was an Islamist savage with previous:

    “The man who carried out the stabbing attack at London Bridge was a former prisoner convicted of a terrorism offence, the BBC has learned. The attacker was out of prison on licence at the time of the attack, in which two people were killed and three were injured, sources said. The man was shot dead by officers after members of the public confronted and restrained him.”

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-50610215

  16. This is the most English thing I’ve ever heard and I love it so much.

    Amy Coop

    A guy who was with us at Fishmongers Hall took a 5’ narwhale tusk from the wall and went out to confront the attacker. You can see him standing over the man (with what looks like a white pole) in the video. We were trying to help victims inside but that man’s a hero #LondonBridge

  17. Phantom,

    What exactly is known about the perpetrator

    The news just said he was a convicted terrorist released from prison.
    If that’s true the shit is really going to hit the fan.

  18. Yes he was a convicted bomb plotter and unreconstructed jihadist who had been released far too early .

  19. Better to release any of these 100 years too late than one minute too early

    Hopefully there will be severe repercussions To this government and to the prison system

  20. there won’t be. The people who decide sentencing policies are far too entrenched in their soft and falsely liberal superiority to ever listen to what they regard as reactive populism and the voters are largely too apathetic to punish the politicians at fault.

  21. Well said, Colm.

  22. London should be proud of its brave citizens. I know that area well – frightening stuff.

    I see (as per usual) a pretty bad fake video is doing the rounds supposedly showing the killer getting back up again. No doubt the low of IQ will be shouting “false flag, deep state etc etc”.

  23. https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-16968518

    The previous conviction was for a role in the foiled bombing of the London Stock Exchange in 2010.

    Usman Khan, 20, and Nazam Hussain, 26, also from Stoke-on-Trent, were ordered to serve at least eight years.

    Given that they were likely arrested in 2010 and remanded in custody following the foiled bombing it is likely he wasn’t subject to early release but had simply served the full sentence.

  24. Usman Khan was one of three convicted terrorists who argued in 2013 that they should not have been given indeterminate sentences for public protection (IPP) which could have kept them in prison beyond their original minimum term.

    The Court of Appeal said the IPP sentences should be replaced with fixed terms and extended licences.

    Usman Khan was ordered to serve at least eight years of his new 16-year sentence, and all three men were told they would be subject to extended licences of five years beyond their sentences.

    2013 plus at least 8 years makes 2021 the earliest when he could be released, does it not?

  25. Not if he was remanded since 2010. Time spent in prison on remand is deducted from the prison sentence. So if you spend 1 year in prison on remand and get a 5 year sentence then you actually only get a 4 year sentence.

  26. It is why you sometimes here in the news a person gets a 2 year sentence, to serve 1 in prison but is released straight away for “time served”.

  27. So even if a new 16-yr sentence is imposed in 2013, he still gets out in 5 years because he was arrested in 2010?

    And more irony, according to the BBC….

    “(Khan) is believed to have been at a Cambridge University conference on prisoner rehabilitation in Fishmonger’s Hall – where the attack is understood to have started.”

  28. “So even if a new 16-yr sentence is imposed in 2013, he still gets out in 5 years because he was arrested in 2010?”

    Pretty much. 50% in prison, 50% on license is universal in British justice. So a 16 year sentence is a 8 year prison sentence, followed by an 8 year license period (with another potential 5 years on license in addition). If he has already served 3 years in prison for this offence then it is actually a 5 year prison sentence.

  29. If the authorities believe someone remains a radicalised security threat and they have acted to genuinely attempt terrorist attacks before as was the case with this man, then they should be kept in some form of continued safe custody . It may be harsh but it is necessary.

  30. Ps – of course regarding this incident, we have to wait for fountain of truth aka Allan to speak . Until then, all else is mere speculation. 😉

  31. //If the authorities believe someone remains a radicalised security threat and they have acted to genuinely attempt terrorist attacks before as was the case with this man, then they should be kept in some form of continued safe custody .//

    But that, apparently, is what the initial sentence was – a fixed term plus an “indeterminate public protection” (IPP) order.
    He appealed, and the latter part was found to be unjust and was dropped from his original sentence and a new 16-yr sentence was pronounced, backdated to 2010 when his period in custody commenced.

  32. Sounds vaguely like internment. Ultimately what needs to be reviewed, in my opinion, is deradicalisation programmes. Clearly, if they exist, they didn’t work in this case.

  33. Its tricky seamus as if you set shall we say loyalty tests ( respect for UK Laws / customs ) to determine whether a person is safe in the community; that can be abused by people lying.
    To set the bar where a person has to demonstrate loyalty would be open to legal query i would have thought .
    Was he tagged – electronically? yesterday

  34. //Sounds vaguely like internment. //

    But don’t they have something similar for cases where the convicted person is considered so unstable that there is a high risk of reoffending?

    In the Ana Kriegel case in Dublin recently, the actual period to be served by one of the boys will be determined by the level of risk he poses to society at a time when release is being considered.

  35. I don’t think it is a question of loyalty, not least because loyalty could be expressed but not held. Many (not all) Islamic extremists are similar to other young people who get involved in gangs, and do so for relatively similar reasons. Many of them are not actually all that religious. They are floundering. They are young and lack purpose in life and so look for purpose. And extremist ideologies offer them that. Offering them purpose through greater education, skills, etc… while in prison, while also tackling their ideology head on, question in it etc… is essential.

  36. “In the Ana Kriegel case in Dublin recently, the actual period to be served by one of the boys will be determined by the level of risk he poses to society at a time when release is being considered.”

    I’m pretty sure as part of a life sentence.

  37. Of course if this jihadist had confined his radical activities to shouting bigoted abuse at children going to school in Birmingham, he would have had full support from our resident ‘Traditional Brit’ Mr Moore 😉

  38. Offering them purpose through greater education, skills, etc… while in prison, while also tackling their ideology head on, question in it etc… is essential.

    I thin he was offered that, don’t know his attendance record; but you’d think that would be tied to his release .. systems failure this !

    Colm, lol that last comment was either a cage-rattler or a poke in the eye
    a beauty man 😉

  39. Many (not all) Islamic extremists are similar to other young people who get involved in gangs, and do so for relatively similar reasons. Many of them are not actually all that religious. They are floundering. They are young and lack purpose in life and so look for purpose. And extremist ideologies offer them that

    That’s a pretty spot on analysis.

    The people who decide sentencing policies are far too entrenched in their soft and falsely liberal superiority to ever listen to what they regard as reactive populism

    Whilst I agree with the general premise Colm these are the people who decide sentencing policy, regularly consulting with victims and the wider public.

    https://www.sentencingcouncil.org.uk/about-us/council-members/

  40. Daphne,

    “This is the most English thing I’ve ever heard and I love it so much.”

    That chap was a Polish chef, apparently. 🙂

  41. Colm,

    there won’t be. The people who decide sentencing policies are far too entrenched in their soft and falsely liberal superiority to ever listen to what they regard as reactive populism and the voters are largely too apathetic to punish the politicians at fault.

    Well said Colm, I agree, sentences for many crimes are far too short.

  42. Here’s the killer speaking to the BBC before his first conviction. (scroll down)

    https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-50615926

  43. Why did he get only 16 years? Why was he released in 8 years? After release was he monitored? And, who decided to let him go to London?

  44. He was on his way to a prisoner rehabilitation event and clearly he had fooled the authorities into believing he was reforming. Having said that and notwithstanding my earlier comments on this matter, I do actually think by and large the authorities and police are doing a good job helping to contain terrorism. In an open with tens of millions of people freely moving about as they do every day, it is impossible to stop all acts of determined violence, but in reality terror acts are actually quite few and far between in the wider scheme of things.

  45. So this Islamist gave the prison authorities a nice load of taqiyya.

    How surprising.

  46. They do a good job considering the enormity of it. There is no doubt about it. But if mistakes were made in this case, important changes can be made to prevent it in the future.

  47. They catch the right wing terror groups easier than the Islamist