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EU “FIGHTING LIKE FERRETS IN A SACK”

By Pete Moore On February 16th, 2020

Beautiful news from across the English Channel.

UK’s withdrawal has left £62bn hole in bloc’s purse for the next seven years

The UK’s withdrawal from the European Union has left a huge €75bn (£62bn) hole in the bloc’s budget for the next seven years, 2021 to 2027. “And now we are fighting like ferrets in a sack,” said one EU diplomat with a sigh.

That’s a big old financial hole we’re leaving behind, and a declining, sclerotic eurozone to attempt a fix. The EU is riven down the middle as a summit is about to begin to agree the budget and, most importantly, who will be coughing up more. More frugal northern European nations want lower budgets. The southern and eastern European nations want bigger budgets and bigger handouts.

I dunno, maybe countries should govern themselves.

29 Responses to “EU “FIGHTING LIKE FERRETS IN A SACK””

  1. lmao

  2. The EU are beyond reason, beyond reform, and way past redemption.

  3. Pat, have you noticed the absolute fucking chaos Britain has been through in the last three years? This is nothing that wasn’t expected.

    This is the working out of the absence of the UK’s contribution and will be managed. Expect similar financial tremors in the UK when the transition period comes to an end and they’re hit with WTO tariffs to trade in the EU market.

  4. About how much would those WTO tariffs be for manufactured goods from the UK to the EU

    The same tariff rates I imagine would apply towards EU manufactured product exports to the UK, unless a deal is struck

  5. Yes they will Phantom but you’ll of course know that a market of some 600,000,000 will be able to absorb pain easier than a market of 65,000,000.

    You can relax and stop being so defensive.

    We all know you think that the EU should give the UK everything they want tied up in a red ribbon with a thank you note but I’m just explaining to Pat that is a new era not seen since 1973 and there are bound to be some bumps that wil have to be smoothed over.

  6. Pete

    You are closer to the situation than I am. Do you happen to know what the tariff rates on manufactures should be expected to be

  7. Paul McMahon, on February 16th, 2020 at 7:44 PM Said:
    Pat, have you noticed the absolute fucking chaos Britain has been through in the last three years?

    Well, as an inhabitant, I haven’t seen any more chaos than normal outside of the political bubble. The ‘chaos’ was synthetic and manufactured by Remainers who simply would not accept the result, and that has not changed.

  8. I live in England..

    What chaos?

    Hyperbolic wishful thinking bigoted anti-British nonsense.

  9. The UK was very divided

    Until the last minute, there were people saying that away should be found to have them stay in, Some demonstrating for that

    At least now you have clarity

  10. Until the last minute, there were people saying that away should be found to have them stay in, Some demonstrating for that
    At least now you have clarity

    Exactly. The ‘chaos’ could have been ended in 2016 with implementation of the result to Leave.

  11. Phantom –

    I don’t know what WTO tariffs are on manufactured goods. It has been reported on various occasions that the average tariff across all sectors is 3 per cent.

    Tariffs are a red herring in the UK-EU trade deal debate. The economies could easily absorb them if we had no trade deal and reverted to WTO terms. The important thing is maintaining supply chains. Zero-tariffs but disrupted supply chains would be more of a problem than tariffs with low supply chain disruption.

    British politics has been chaotic, but it had nothing to do with leaving the EU. It was wholly and only a consequence of the pro-EU establishment trying to keep us in the EU. The chaos was pro-EU chaos.

  12. Tariffs are a red herring in the UK-EU trade deal debate. The economies could easily absorb them if we had no trade deal and reverted to WTO terms.

    LOL

    Tell that to the sheep farmers who would face 40% tariffs immediately. And I say bring it on because we need to stop farming sheep asap. The only reason that we do is because of taxpayer subsidies.

  13. Peter

    What’s wrong with sheep farming?

  14. Charles

    Areas with sheep farming are eco-deserts, however pretty they may appear. The worst example is the English Lake District, but most of upland Britain and Ireland should be tree-covered and is virtually treeless, mainly due to sheep:

    “In Britain, strangely, the lowlands are largely bare and the uplands are even barer. This is not a natural condition. In Norway, at the same latitudes as northern Scotland, in similar climatic conditions, trees cover the high mountainsides[3]. The uplands of Britain would once have been largely forested. But, aside from plantations of exotic conifers, there are few trees in this country above 200m.

    Our bare hills are an artefact of three principal activities: sheep farming, deer stalking and grouse shooting. Sheep and deer selectively browse out tree seedlings, ensuring that existing forests cannot regenerate and trees cannot repopulate bare land. Sheep are a fully automated system for environmental destruction. Once they are released into the hills, no further human agency is required to prevent ecological recovery…”

    https://www.monbiot.com/2017/01/04/the-hills-are-dead/

  15. Peter

    Very informative, thank you.

  16. Thanks Charles, I’ll admit that sheep are a bit of an obsession. They were imported into Europe from the middle east and introduced to Britain by the Romans. By Tudor times the wool trade was extremely profitable and a main source of tax revenue, and the Speaker of the House of Lords still sits on a woolsack. But sheep farming in Britain and Ireland has been uneconomic for many decades and only survives due to subsidies. And in the uplands it is responsible for eco-deserts.

  17. Brexit: France warns UK of bitter trade negotiations

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-51526784

  18. Oh dear.oh deary, deary me..

    Trump’s EU slapdown: Tariffs soar after WTO finds EU illegally subsidisised plane making
    DONALD TRUMP will hike up tariffs on billions of euros worth of European Union aircraft imports next month after the World Trade Organization found Europe was illegally subsidising plane-making to help undercut US giant Boeing.

    https://www.express.co.uk/news/world/1243275/US-news-Donald-Trump-EU-Airbus-Boeing-trade-tariff-latest-update

  19. Oh dear.oh deary, deary me..

    That tremendous UK-US trade deal that Brexiters were pinning so much hope on receeds by the day…..

    https://fortune.com/2020/02/07/trump-johnson-huawei-ban/

  20. And of course Noel, with both the UK & US prioritising trade deals with the EU over each other:

    https://www.cnbc.com/2020/01/22/uk-eu-trade-deal-is-a-priority-ahead-of-one-with-the-us-sajid-javid.html

    https://www.businessinsider.com/donald-trump-strike-trade-deal-with-eu-ahead-of-uk-2020-2?IR=T

    It’ll be interesting to see how it goes.

    Meanwhile, from Kurt’s link:

    We want a relationship based on friendly cooperation between sovereign equals, one centred on free trade and inspired by our shared history and values

    If the UK think they’re going to negotiate trade terms as equals with the biggest market in the western word I suspect they’re in for some nasty surprises.

  21. Noel

    I think that if the UK/EU trade negotiations were done by businesspeople, that the tone of the negotiations and the result would be more practical, more good for all sides ( the US and Japan should have a desire that the Europeans work out a deal that both can live with )

  22. . . . have you noticed the absolute fucking chaos Britain has been through in the last three years?

    I must confess that I have not noticed. But I have noticed that Greece, Spain, Portugal, Italy, France and even Germany are not doing so good.

    The EU’s main problem and concern regarding the UK is one of trade. They are desperate to maintain their lucrative UK Market and fend off any other competition.

    Tariffs cut both ways and are paid for by the consumer. If the EU places tariff on UK goods EU Customers pay more and vice versa. No one wants this and, as the EU sell more to us if the UK secured a trade deal with other countries and not the EU, the UK could put tariffs on their goods whilst sourcing cheaper from elsewhere.

    If they think that the hole in their budget is bad, wait until we start buying cheaper and better from elsewhere.

  23. Peter.

    Your post on sheep farming was very informative thank you.
    Where I live in West lancs they have a hell of a lot of sheep and dairy farming around here.

  24. Meat is murder.

    But not chicken.

  25. Trump:to Johnson: Its our wei or the Hiwei
    Johnson: Have it hua-wei then

    need to get the beauty of it hot 😉

  26. The UK could put tariffs on their goods whilst sourcing cheaper from elsewhere

    Of course they could. the EU could also do the same. The rub here of course is that the EU is the biggest market in the western world that the UK are chomping at the bit to keep access to.

    Wait until we start buying cheaper and better from elsewhere.

    Indeed, I’m sure the Brit agricultural sector can’t wait to have their market flooded with cheaper, chemically treated beef etc, And with no EU subsidies to ease the pain what are those Brit farmers going to do?

  27. //I think that if the UK/EU trade negotiations were done by businesspeople, //

    Yes, I think any future US – UK trade negotiations should be conducted in an adult fashion, but with the leaders on both sides don’t see how that’s possible.

  28. the us side is headed by an i win you lose guy, not an ally of the uk

  29. I think that if the UK/EU trade negotiations were done by businesspeople, that the tone of the negotiations and the result would be more practical, more good for all sides

    Wouldyou also be happy for businesspeople to set immigration policy as well as trade policy?