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LITTLE LEO UNFRIENDS THE EU

By Pete Moore On February 22nd, 2020

How times change. A year ago Leo Varadkar was full of himself, boasting that “I am the EU” on Brexit, as he warned a British Prime Minister of tough realities outside of his beloved European Union. Having served his purpose, he and the Republic of Ireland are learning of the tough realities of life inside the European Union without the UK contribution.

Oh wow, maybe the cost of staying in such a great thing like the EU can run too high after all. Having allowed that you can pay too much for too little in return, he might start to wonder why we left. It’ll be Irexit next, then a border poll – one where the Irish decide to apply to rejoin the United Kingdom.

15 Responses to “LITTLE LEO UNFRIENDS THE EU”

  1. It’ll be Irexit next, then a border poll – one where the Irish decide to apply to rejoin the United Kingdom.

    HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA

    Even by Pete’s standards that’s too tall a tale to swallow.

  2. Having served his purpose,

    Precisely, that bus has arrived.

    Little Leo The Brussels ex- bitch will be looking to get his snout deep into that Brussels trough of plenty.

    After landing the next three generations of Irish with German and EU banking debt, he might just be thrown a bone instead of completely under that bus?

    Intro way, he is now pretty much surplus to EU requirements.

  3. Are the morons still playing this argument? That Varadkar was serving the EU’s bidding and not the other way around?

  4. At this point, what leverage does the caretaker Taioseach have in negotiating budgets with the EU? The little ROI is between a fiscal rock and a hard place.

  5. Yes Seamus.

    Much as I’m loath to admit it both Varadker and his predecessor Enda Kelly represented Ireland’s interests brilliantly in the Brexit shitstorm and the EU supported them on every position.

  6. As Noel says, when in doubt, blame the Brits!

  7. “At this point, what leverage does the caretaker Taioseach have in negotiating budgets with the EU? The little ROI is between a fiscal rock and a hard place.”

    Caretaker wise makes no difference. Until a new Taoiseach is approved by the Dáil and appointed by the President then Leo Varadkar continues as the Taoiseach. And the institutions of the European Union are representative of the EU’s member state governments.

    So Ireland’s representative on the European Council will continue to be Leo Varadkar. The representative on the Economic and Financial Affairs configuration of the Council of the European Union is Paschal Donohoe. The election, and the failure of Leo Varadkar to be re-elected as Taoiseach doesn’t change that.

    Ultimately the adoption of the budget only requires a majority vote in the Council of the European Union so Ireland’s position is not a strong one (due to only being one vote in the Council, representing only 0.9% of the EU’s population). But the domestic problems facing Varadkar are irrelevant to the situation. He is, EU-wise, in as strong a position now as he was a month ago.

  8. “As Noel says, when in doubt, blame the Brits!”

    To be fair normally not that far wrong.

    “Much as I’m loath to admit it both Varadker and his predecessor Enda Kelly represented Ireland’s interests brilliantly in the Brexit shitstorm and the EU supported them on every position.”

    Indeed. I found myself oddly defensive of Varadkar during the Brexit negotiations, a position I’m not fond of being in. He’s a blueshirt bastard but he’s our blueshirt bastard.

  9. You can definitely blame us British for bailing the Paddies out in 2010.

    You’re welcome.

  10. As Noel says, when in doubt, blame the Brits!

    Charles:

    arethebritsatitagain.com

  11. The UK made money on that deal. It was a loan, not a bailout.

  12. Seamus.

    No matter.

    You can still thank us Brits.

    You’re welcome.

  13. And Ireland did. With interest.

  14. It was a loan, not a bailout

    Yes, the loan was made in 2010. As of June 2011 the UK had a €9bn debt deficit with the ROI:

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-15748696

  15. Good analysis on some of the variations that could be coming down the road:

    http://www.progressivepulse.org/brexit/will-the-uk-go-rogue-on-northern-ireland