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IS ANYONE STILL PAYING FOR THIS CRAP?

By Pete Moore On February 25th, 2020

Who pays to be lied to? Outside of Westminster dungeons, who pays to be insulted and abused?

The BBC’s head of drama has insisted that ‘woke’ is not a dirty word, as he argued that the corporation must “repurpose” classic novels by giving them female, black and Asian characters.

Period dramas based on stories written 100 or more years ago have to be made more diverse for a 21st century British audience, said Piers Wenger, otherwise the BBC would be “in dereliction of our duty”.

“It is our duty to lie” is what he is saying. It is the BBC’s duty to lie, just as the press lied about the news in the Societ Union, just as the cultural institutions lied about history and current affairs.

It is our duty to lie about British and European achievements, our history, our culture and heritage. Our duty is to create a false narrative to fit our ultra-left, woke politics. Truth and beauty must give way before our our prejudices.

BBC watchers of course know that the BBC has long been Sovietised. Every drama, every play, every news report, every comment piece drips with woke moral instruction to the peasants listening in.

I really am astonished that there is anyone left paying for this decrepit, lying, atrocious propaganda. No, I have not paid the telly tax for two decades now – two whole decades this year – and I never will again. Screw them. The BBC is the HQ of the enemy class. A free, mature people ought to have nothing to do with it, I will not pay a single penny to be lied to and for heritage and history to be re-written. I urge everyone to do the same.

13 Responses to “IS ANYONE STILL PAYING FOR THIS CRAP?”

  1. //Period dramas based on stories written 100 or more years ago have to be made more diverse for a 21st century British audience, said Piers Wenger, otherwise the BBC would be “in dereliction of our duty”.

    “It is our duty to lie” is what he is saying.//

    I heard the top man in the German state TV and radio broadcaster say more or less the same thing. An interviewer, who was obviously very much on his side, mentioned very vaguely public disquiet about the suppression of certain kinds of stories. This was early January 2016, if anyone remembers.

    He said that while he appreciates public concerns, the primary duty of a public broadcaster is to promote “social harmony” and that has a higher priority than the need for journalist integrity or a duty to report the full truth.

    In short, better to support a lie than admit to disorder in the state, as another famous German once said.

  2. “I will not pay a single penny to be lied to and for heritage and history to be re-written.”

    History to be re-written!

    What a load of bollocks.

    The two stories referenced in the article, The War of the Worlds and A Christmas Carol are fiction. That means they didn’t happen. There is a huge history of adapting fiction and changing elements of the story. The most famous adaption of War of the Worlds, by Orson Welles, changed the time and location of the events.

    One of de Vere’s most famous plays, Romeo and Juliet, was adapted into a musical about Puerto Ricans.

    Even adaptions that remain very faithful to the source material often make changes to characters or story line.

    But whenever someone, whose skin tone does not meet the approval of the Gammon thought police, makes an appearance, we are treated on Twitter and various right wing media outlets to a outpouring of pearl clutching and drama queen histrionics.

    We should consider trigger warnings for the poor little snowflakes.

  3. It seems those who complain the most about ‘snowflakes’ getting a upset over insignificant things, are the ones who get most upset over nothing.
    The BBC are just reworking classic fiction with a modern twist, just like Hollywood and TV around the world has done for decades. As I’ve said before, these productions will stand or fall based on whether people enjoy them or not.

  4. Fews,

    “The two stories referenced in the article, The War of the Worlds and A Christmas Carol are fiction. That means they didn’t happen. There is a huge history of adapting fiction and changing elements of the story. ”

    Well said. This kind of remixing has been going on forever.

    Though i would take issue with the BBC guy’s “Period dramas based on stories written 100 or more years ago have to be made more diverse for a 21st century British audience”. Well, no. It’s fine if they are, but they don’t have to be, and it would be pretty tedious if they all were. What they have to be ideally is entertaining, well written, good stories, etc. Throwing in clumsy moralising that is as subtle as a flying mallet, and little else, is not a requirement.

    And really those on the other extreme are not much better, for example taking exception if someone without a disability plays someone who has, and of course also very concerned that everybody has the correct skin tone. For every rightworld snowflake there’s nowadays seemingly three from leftworld, all engaged in an arms race to see who can be the one to find the most ludicrous premise to declare something, anything, to be “problematic”.

    I did enjoy Pete’s second link though, the chap there is quite the contrarian.

    Last week, for example, I put out my annual call for the repeal of the laws against drinking and driving. My argument is that the dangers of drinking and driving are much exaggerated – the published statistics are puffed up by including cases where drunken pedestrians or cyclists have got themselves knocked down.

    Lol!!

  5. His annual call, mind you. I would like to see this guy’s calendar.

  6. One of de Vere’s most famous plays, Romeo and Juliet, was adapted into a musical about Puerto Ricans.

    No shit? But Jerome Robbins didn’t feel obliged to put the Puerto Ricans into 16th-Century Verona. That would portray a world which didn’t exist.

  7. “That would portray a world which didn’t exist. That would portray a world which didn’t exist.”

    It would be like Hobbits on the Hogwarts express. A complete rewriting of history!

    And don’t get me started on that remake of Sherlock Holmes where he had a smartphone.

    His descendants would be turning in their graves.

  8. And don’t get me started on that remake of Sherlock Holmes where he had a smartphone.

    I really enjoyed the BBC remake of Sherlock.

  9. No shit? But Jerome Robbins didn’t feel obliged to put the Puerto Ricans into 16th-Century Verona. That would portray a world which didn’t exist.

    So what?

  10. New BBC musical , Seven child brides for seven of the brothers.

    Coming soon

  11. “I really am astonished that there is anyone left paying for this . . . ”

    Why the astonishment when one is forced to by rule of law to pay, irrespective of whether we watch it or not ?

  12. How many BAME people at the Executive board of the BBC?

    Under the new targets by 2020 half of the workforce will be female, eight per cent disabled, 15 per cent ethnic minorities and eight per cent lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender.

    But not at the Executive board of the BBC it seems.

  13. Frank –

    It would be like Hobbits on the Hogwarts express. A complete rewriting of history!

    Not the same, though The Hobbit declares beautiful nationalist themes. Woke hobbits would be a better example.

    Like woke hobbits, the BBC’s unceasing revision of historical classics is deliberately trying to change our perceptions of our country’s past. It is rewriting history by the second degree because it lacks the power to do so blatantly (which it would do if it could so do).