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A CHANGE HAS COME FOR THE NHS

By Pete Moore On March 28th, 2020

What a pity it took a epidemic to force a bloated and complacent bureaucracy to change. What a pity so many hundreds of billions of Pounds have been wasted along the way. This is actually a fascinating piece on what sounds like a revolution in the NHS, forced on it by harsh reality –

What doctors like me have witnessed over the past days and weeks has been nothing short of extraordinary […]

An NHS infamous for its bureaucracy is now behaving like a Silicon Valley startup: if you can show that it will help patients and get the service ready, then it’s green-lit. Just get on with it. Many of us have noted that this is how it should have been in the health service all along — but somewhere along the line the apparatchiks took over and stifled innovation. Not any longer.

It’s been fascinating to watch staff rise to the occasion, natural leaders taking charge in place of those we can now see were just paper-pushers. It’s also become apparent how so many of the managerial jobs are unnecessary or redundant now that the chips are really down. Perhaps this will create a culture shift in the health service that makes it more focused on outcomes and patients’ care and less interested in the labyrinthine and suffocating administration.

12 Responses to “A CHANGE HAS COME FOR THE NHS”

  1. Fair points, reform required

  2. Do you support NHS reform, or NHS destruction?

  3. Reform.

    Less, in fact none, zero, diversity officers on 90k a year.

    And more medical equipment.

  4. I’ve been contemplating a post on the good that this situation has done. There is a lot if you can cut through the panic and bullshit this has provided the perfect opportunity for an evaluation od the business structure on every company except retail.

  5. Not going there Phantom. I’m not doing that dance yet again. This observation jumps out –

    It’s been fascinating to watch staff rise to the occasion, natural leaders taking charge in place of those we can now see were just paper-pushers.

    Some of us will have known these bureaucratic empire-builders, mediocre people who add no value but get in everyone’s way.

    At the end of this, the coronavirus ledger will hopefully record a severe culling of NHS bureaucrats.

  6. At the end of this, the coronavirus ledger will hopefully record a severe culling of NHS bureaucrats.

    Amen to that.

    That swamp needs draining.

  7. I don’t believe that any of the NHS advocates on this site have ever stated that front line resources should be sacrificed to bureaucracy.

    It’s also become apparent how so many of the managerial jobs are unnecessary or redundant now that the chips are really down. Perhaps this will create a culture shift in the health service that makes it more focused on outcomes and patients’ care and less interested in the labyrinthine and suffocating administration.

    This would be a welcome development.

  8. Pete

    There will be an NHS in Britain 50 or 100 years from now

    You can take comfort in that.

  9. The NHS entered this pandemic critically short of equipment, especially protective items for doctors and nurses to stop them getting infected. That shortage is 100% down to the Tories, not “NHS beaurocracy”:

    “A recommendation for all frontline NHS staff to be given protective equipment during a flu epidemic was rejected as too costly, an explosive memo reveals. Labour said the decision – made in 2017, when Jeremy Hunt was the health secretary – left “serious questions” for ministers to answer about whether underfunding was now costing lives.

    In recent weeks, doctors and nurses have protested against a shortage of equipment which has left them at risk of contracting – and spreading – coronavirus on hospital wards.”

    https://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/coronavirus-nhs-protective-equipment-jeremy-hunt-eye-protection-a9431311.html

  10. Peter –

    You neglected to read on. That piece in the notorious far-left propaganda sheet obviously lays the blame with “officials”, i.e. bureaucrats.

  11. No

  12. I agree.
    As I’ve said for many years now, the NHS needs reform.
    Successive Labour and Conservative governments, have made things worse within the NHS, not better.