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Still a Brexit fight…….

By Patrick Van Roy On September 8th, 2020

 

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Those close to Sir Jonathan said he was “very unhappy” about the decision to overwrite parts of the Northern Ireland protocol, part of the 2019 withdrawal agreement, with new powers in the UK internal market bill. One person familiar with the events leading up to Sir Jonathan’s decision to resign said it had followed months of tension over the handling of the Brexit negotiations and le

25 Responses to “Still a Brexit fight…….”

  1. The British government genuinely openly announced this afternoon that they were no longer obeying the rule-of-law. Not suprising then that the top government lawyer doesn’t want anything to do with that.

  2. Blundering Boris taking first steps down a bad road?

  3. They have reneged on an international agreement, the old moniker of Perfidious Albion immediately springs to mind.

    Let them, let them leave with no deal, let them be known internationally as untrustworthy pariahs, let Irish America wield its considerable influence in disparaging them for physically partitioning Ireland once again.

  4. the worst possible thing to do at the worst poss time
    yes seamus i saw the clip, a gov’y minister admits this will break international law
    Nobody in their right mind is going to make deals with the UK .
    and as you say paul congress in USA have explicitly said they won’t back any deal which messes with the GFA
    Here we have BJ following the Trunk , thinking breaking the law doesn’t apply to wealthy, privileged, silver spoon etonian tories, aka aging white farts who temporarily have their hands on power .
    I never thought we’ be fighting for democracy in West in the 21st Century, thought it was a done deal.

    ( c’mon Harri we know you’re still on the loo, cme out and call me a rascist and give us a 5-fer 😉

  5. If Trump is re-elected, he probably could care less about the GFA.

  6. Johnson said yesterday that a deal with the EU like the one Australia has would be great for Britain.

    There’s little point expecting anything from that kind of eegit.

  7. If Trump is re-elected, he probably could care less about the GFA

    I think that’s correct and probably think that Trump wouldn’t be able to find Ireland if he didn’t have a golf course in it. I think that Trump being Trump will invariably see the UK in a weakened position and try to squeeze it for every last drop in a trade negotiation. I’d like to think that all is not lost though and that Irish America isn’t completely Trumpified to not care.

    Johnson’s Northern Ireland Secretary admits that any amendment to the agreement will break International Law:

    https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-politics-54073836

  8. you can almost be certain this brass-neck is coming from cummings
    he’s he a weird lil one that one, has a dark charisma to be sure
    no law does this man observe .. its a kinky thing for him i reckon
    he gets off on it .. very very dangerous ofc to be anywhere near power

  9. If the Dems win big, Irish America will certainly have a voice.

    But it’s not just Irish Americans. I’d think that many other Americans are friends of Ireland and are aware of the value of the imperfect but important GFA.

    But if Trump gets in there once more, you have a problem. He is obsessed with Obama, and seeks to undo anything that Obama ever did. Wait until someone tells him that the GFA was done with the sustained honest broker assistance of President Clinton. He will fly to Belfast or London just to rip the agreement up himself.

    Undoing the GFA would make Johnson one of the worst PMs in the modern age I would think. Nothing good would come of it.

  10. Any trade deal with America has to have the backing of both the House and the Senate. So unless Trump gets re-elected with a Republican House and a Republican Senate then the Dems will still have a fair amount of negotiating power, and could block a deal.

  11. And perhaps the EU will be more difficult to deal with if Britain defaults on the GFA.

    The agreement was never a sure thing, and if it is busted up by a clumsy PM, there’s no guarantee that it can be re-established.

    There may be no good choices, but this would seem especially bad.

  12. If Brexit undermines the Good Friday accord, there will be no chance of a U.S.-U.K. trade agreement passing the Congress. The peace of the Good Friday Agreement is treasured by the American people and will be fiercely defended on a bicameral and bipartisan basis in the United States Congres

    https://www.speaker.gov/newsroom/81419-3

    Bicameral and bipartisan

    Interesting.

    The agreement was never a sure thing, and if it is busted up by a clumsy PM, there’s no guarantee that it can be re-established.

    The majority of the electorate in the North are still in support of the GFA. The British breaking International Law is one thing, the British undermining an International Treaty between two sovereign states, which is held up to the world as an imperfect model for peace and which was ratified by a large majority of the Irish electorate would surely make them untouchable?

  13. paul what i find strange is unionism hasn’t really made much noise since the DUP blew every card they had , and BJ won a large majority. They had their tail between their legs and darn well had to go back into gov with SF , else risk annihilation at new assembley elections.

    so why is BJ raising all this now, i can’t see any pressure he’s under , and as he told huge whoppers already to unionism he has shown he’ll tell them anything.
    I don’t get this , its so unsmart of any gov’t to try to untangle the GFA
    Is there a tape with him in a compromising situ with Arlene Foster
    as least that would make sense.
    Leave it to colm to unpack that one 😉

  14. I would welcome dispassionate comment on the “why ” , just the facts.

  15. So why is BJ raising all this now

    I honestly don’t know but suspect it a desperate trade deal negotiation tactic.

  16. The British government genuinely openly announced this afternoon that they were no longer obeying the rule-of-law.

    They are proposing to change the law, not disobey it. How does it go, mon petit Remainers?

    “Parliament can do what it likes.”

    And perhaps the EU will be more difficult to deal with if Britain defaults on the GFA.

    The EU can hardly be more difficult to deal with anyway, but no-one is defaulting on that. The GFA will remain untouched and unchanged. The government has decided that it doesn’t like one or two details of the withdrawal agreement. So it will change those details.

    The EU has destroyed the rule of law and broken the Lisbon Treaty. The EU is obliged by international law and international treaty and the holy relics Jack Delors himself to make best and good efforts to negotiate a trade deal with the UK. It has refused to do so. The UK is simply making contingency arrangments.

    “Parliament can do what it likes.”

  17. Parliament can do what it likes

    Absolutely it can, within it’s own domestic jurisdiction the will of Parliament is sovereign.

    It’s the breaking of International Law and the reneging on previous agreements that’s the issue here.

  18. They can I believe tear up most bilateral treaties as they wish.

    The question is – is doing so a good idea.

    Is it in their own long term interest, is it harming the interest of any friendly countries, etc?

  19. “It has refused to do so”

    What evidence is there that the EU has refused to do so?

  20. Phantom –

    My reading.

    The EU has been wholly intransigent because it cannot process the idea that the UK is an independent, sovereign country. It still insists on having access to British fishing waters in future on terms unchanged from the Common Fisheries Policy. It still insists that the UK follow certain EU rules and regulations in future. Since Boris became PM the UK government has been clear that this is absurd and unacceptable.

    Boris has said that if there is no trade deal agreed by 15th October then both sides should accept that the UK finally leaves on WTO terms.

    The latest round of trade talks began today in London.

    This is shot across the EU bow.

  21. “Boris has said that if there is no trade deal agreed by 15th October then both sides should accept that the UK finally leaves on WTO terms.”

    Britain can leave on WTO terms. For the UK to do so would be tearing up an international treaty and an assault on the rule of law.

    “The EU has been wholly intransigent because it cannot process the idea that the UK is an independent, sovereign country.”

    And Perfidious Albion have been completely intransigent because it cannot process the idea that the benefits of the EU require membership of the EU.

  22. Seamus –

    Michel Barnier himself has admitted that the EU has been intransigent.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/46401558

    The EU’s chief negotiator Michel Barnier has said annual negotiations with the UK would be technically impossible because so many different types of fish would be involved.

    But he has also acknowledged that the EU’s current position on fishing will have to change.

    “The EU wants the status quo, the UK wants to change everything,” he said on 5 June. “If we want an agreement we have to discuss somewhere in between these positions.”

    But Mr Barnier needs to get permission from EU countries with big fishing fleets (such as France and Spain) before he seeks to compromise.

    “The EU wants the status quo, the UK wants to change everything,” he said on 5 June.

  23. “Michel Barnier himself has admitted that the EU has been intransigent.”

    No he hasn’t. He is saying that the two sides disagree. You seem to feel disagreeing with your particular political masters is intransigent. What a good little statist you have become.

  24. Yes Pete, your reading is always spot on too:

    http://www.atangledweb.org/?p=64059

    The EU wants the status quo, the UK wants to change everything,” he said on 5 June. “If we want an agreement we have to discuss somewhere in between these positions

    Yeah, that’s ‘intransigence’ right enough.

  25. This is either a bluff or a deliberate strategy to maintain and superheat the Brexit jingoism that won the Tories the election. Whip up the public with the aid of the tabloids and right wing press into a continuing two fingers to Europe celebrating no deal and tearing up the withdrawal agreement even if such immaturity damages is economically and in terms of international confidence in th U.K..