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SENSATIONAL

By Pete Moore On September 13th, 2020

The United Kingdom’s lead negotiator with the EU has felt the need to go public on the EU’s dirty threats. He confirms reports that the EU has “explicitly” threatened to block the export of food from England, Wales and Scotland to Northern Ireland.

It cannot be stressed enough that the EU objects to amendments which would only kick in if the EU reneges on its promise, enacted in the Withdrawal Agreement, to agree a trade deal. They are a backstop, if you like. Unroll please –

32 Responses to “SENSATIONAL”

  1. *Sigh

    Simon Coveney on the Andrew Marr show:

    AM “Would the EU block goods entering Northern Ireland from Britain?”

    SC “Sorry, there is no blockade proposed. And that is the type of inflammatory language coming from No 10 which is spin. And not truth”

    https://twitter.com/OxfordDiplomat/status/1305075439183056896

  2. They couldn’t blockade that trade even if they wished to

    Why keep bringing this up

  3. Yes Pete. The EU is not Mother Teresa, which seems to be hard to accept for some hereabouts.

    A no-deal Brexit will be a disaster for the UK economy. The much-trumpeted trade deal with Japan this week is with a trading partner which accounts for about 5% of the trade we have with Germany, France and Holland. And we have rightly given up on the possibility of a deal with Trump. So “global Britain” is bullshit.

    However, I think the talks should be ended now, preferably by mutual agreement, before they get even more acrimonious. We can always come back to the table after a year or so, when tempers have cooled and the full damage of no-deal should concentrate minds, on both sides. In the meantime, our fish stocks will get a breather.

  4. The EU is not Mother Teresa, but do you believe for one minute that it contemplates blockading any intra UK trade under any circumstances?

    The only source of this insane claim appears to be Mr Johnson.

  5. The blockading claim is an EU lie. The UK government has referred to heavy inspections and tariffs, not blockades. Never underestimate the EU’s capacity to lie when it suits it. It has decades of practice and the 2015 Greek playbook in particular. And the Irish government was one of the most willing helpers when the Germans and French beat up the Greeks.

  6. “We are being told that the EU will not only impose tariffs on goods moving from Great Britain to Northern Ireland, but that they might actually stop the transport of food products from GB to NI.”

    Mr Johnson said this.

    What’s that if not a blockade?

    The EU has no,power to do either of these things, and they’re not seeking those powers either

    As noted, a number of Conservative Party figures are not at all happy with what Johnson wants to do

  7. The EU controls its Single Market and has full power to block any goods which it deems not to meet Single Market standards. That threat was made to GB-NI food exports last week and that’s what provoked the UK government to take the action it has taken.

    That action is a part-reneging on a treaty signed in January, as the UK government has admitted. But the spirit of that treaty as contained in the (non-enforceable, how convenient) political declaration was that each side would act in good faith to secure a trade deal which would mean that the NI protocol would not be needed. That EU threat on foodstuffs was not a good faith action by any stretch of the imagination.

  8. “which would mean that the NI protocol would not be needed”

    You are confused, Peter. The NI Protocol is not the “backstop”; it is permanent. It is needed and will remain. Johnson knows this because it is in the Agreement he negotiated and signed.

  9. //Yes Pete. The EU is not Mother Teresa//

    Oh come on Peter, there’s no need to be so disingenuous. No one is suggesting such a thing.

    //The blockading claim is an EU lie//

    Well you’d better tell the Irish Times, Der Welt, Rueters etc because that’s what they’re reporting:

    //We are being told that the EU will not only impose tariffs on goods moving from Great Britain to Northern Ireland, but that they might actually stop the transport of food products from GB to NI//

    https://uk.reuters.com/article/us-britain-eu-johnson/uk-pm-johnson-accuses-eu-of-using-threatening-food-blockade-idUSKBN26230H

    If it walks, talks like a blockade etc. It is of course rubbish:

    https://www.irishtimes.com/news/politics/boris-johnson-s-claims-of-eu-blockade-in-irish-sea-rubbished-in-dublin-1.4354020

    Reg is correct above regarding the distinction between the ‘backstop’ and the NI Protocol.

  10. Can anyone who actually believes Johnson’s lies about a blockade, and preventing food from going to Northern Ireland, point me to the clauses in the Internal Market Bill that prevent those things from happening?

    Because I’ve yet to find anyway that export declarations when sending goods from Northern Ireland to Britain, or state aid, has anything to do with importing food into Northern Ireland.

  11. OT but I just had to say how pleased I am the tougher sentences are going to be introduced for drivers who kill or injure whilst speeding or using a mobile phone.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8729005/Killer-drivers-face-life-jail-parents-young-girl-mown-welcome-move.html

  12. I’m not a big fan of the “tougher sentences” crowd, being much more from the rehabilitation of offenders than vengeance school of thought. That being said I’ve never understood why death by dangerous driving is an offence in its own right and isn’t simply treated as manslaughter.

  13. I wouldn’t say I’m a member of the ‘tougher sentences’, crowd, and I support punishment and rehabilitation, not vengeance, as I’ve mentioned many times on these pages. However, when it comes to certain crimes, suchs as driving offences and murder, I believe many sentences in UK are for too light. And I agree, death by dangerous driving should be treated as manslaughter.

  14. “However, when it comes to certain crimes, suchs as driving offences and murder, I believe many sentences in UK are for too light. “

    Is there any evidence that recidivism by people committing serious driving offences or murder is higher than other crimes, and that higher sentences would reduce it? Murder tariffs are an average of about 10 years less in Northern Ireland than in Britain. But as far as I am aware there is not any substantial difference in recidivism.

  15. Punishment is an essential feature to any proper justice system

    Not vengeance, punishment

    If someone only has one enemy in the world, and he intentionally murders that one enemy, he is unlikely to repeat the offense

    But he still should go away for a very long time

    For the purpose of his punishment, and also for the purpose of telling the rest of society that it’s not OK to shoot people that you don’t like

  16. “Not vengeance, punishment”

    Punishment is by definition vengeance.

    vengeance
    /ˈvɛn(d)ʒ(ə)ns/
    noun
    punishment inflicted or retribution exacted for an injury or wrong.

    “If someone only has one enemy in the world, and he intentionally murders that one enemy, he is unlikely to repeat the offense”

    Not necessarily, because he may develop a new enemy. And he would still possess the mentality that it is ok to murder someone he considers an enemy. Thus he poses a risk to the public and has not be rehabilitated.

    However if it was found that he was rehabilitated and no longer posed a threat, even if he did consider someone his enemy, then keeping that person in prison poses no benefit to society other than making people feel better through the suffering of others. It is ultimately a form sadism.

    “For the purpose of his punishment, and also for the purpose of telling the rest of society that it’s not OK to shoot people that you don’t like”

    Have you any evidence that increasing sentences from 15 years to 25 years would act as a deterrent?

  17. All murderers should be punished

  18. “All murderers should be punished”

    So pain should be inflicted (and yes denial of liberty, denail of rights is painful) even if inflicting that pain serves no benefit to society?

  19. Punishment of murderers is in my opinion of enormous benefit to society.

    The only question is what a proper punishment may be.

  20. Punishment of murderers is in my opinion of enormous benefit to society

    Well firstly there are differing degrees of murder and then there are unlawful killings which are not murder. The object of the criinal justoce system is to punish, protect and rehabilitate with the denial of liberty and choice as the punishment.

    I don’t see how further punishment past incarceration benefits society.

  21. BTW, to get back on track for a minute, five former Brit PMs, both Con & Lab, have criticised Johnson’s welshing:

    https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-politics-54145202

  22. Paul

    I don’t disagree

    Incarceration for whatever the proper time is, that’s the punishment. People won’t always agree on what the proper time is

    My only point here is that without punishment For murder, assault, robbery or other crimes there is no possibility of any justice.

    I support strong training for rehabilitation. There’s nearly none of that in US prisons. They are schools for crime,

    And the death penalty is off the table, For the reasons stated on these pages many times

  23. Seamus,

    Is there any evidence that recidivism by people committing serious driving offences or murder is higher than other crimes, and that higher sentences would reduce it? Murder tariffs are an average of about 10 years less in Northern Ireland than in Britain. But as far as I am aware there is not any substantial difference in recidivism.

    I really don’t know to be honest, butthat doesn’t really relate to the point I’m making. Which is that many sentences for murder are far too short.
    I know of cases where people have committed murder, and been out in less than 10 years. I realise that cases have to be taken on their individual merits and there are exceptions, but even so a short sentence like this for murder is usually wrong in my opinion.

  24. My only point here is that without punishment For murder, assault, robbery or other crimes there is no possibility of any justice.

    But if we agree that denial of liberty and choice is the punishment what further punishment do you consider just?

    What I will say is that in Britain & Ireland a ‘life sentence’ is typically 13 – 16 years. IMO a life sentence for a murder without mitigating factors should be a minimum 20 years tariff before parole is considered and those 20 years should have a heavy rehabilitation focus.

  25. I don’t want anything further than that.

    I believe that we are on the same page or close to it here

  26. Well said Paul. I’m pretty much in agreement mate.

  27. Is there much effort put into rehabilitation, reform in UK and Irish prisons?

    Again, nearly zero here AFAIK.

  28. Yes. We seem to be in agreement.

    I spoke recently about the nonchalantly causual murder of my friend thirteen years ago. Not only have the fucking human offal that murdered him never shown remorse or contrition but they have actually jeered the daughters of the victim:

    https://sarahjtholland.wordpress.com/2017/12/20/justice-for-harry-holland/

    The sheer evil and inhumanity of this case makes me question my stance on the death penalty but yes, we are in agreement that it is off the table for the reasons discussed here previously although the fucking monster that murdered Harry should not have been released from prison until he was a very, very old man.

    Phantom, I know quite a few former prisoners who gained some pretty high academic qualifications while in prison, up to & including PhDs.

  29. I think that a US president could put federal and state prison reform on the table, and that if presented properly, that there would be broad support for it.

    Trump has actually taken important first steps in this general area.

    I think that I am clear eyed on this issue, and I think that most who are in prison deserve to be there, but I absolutely think that people can be reformed if that is what they want to do.

    Very many people could go good or bad growing up, it is often a close call. Some who err can be redeemed, to the benefit of themselves, their families and society. Yes, that is possible, and yes, we are not doing enough to help those people

    https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefings-statements/president-donald-j-trump-championed-reforms-providing-hope-forgotten-americans/

  30. Phantom,

    Is there much effort put into rehabilitation, reform in UK and Irish prisons?

    Again, nearly zero here AFAIK.

    Ministers have been talking for years, especially the conservatives, about tougher sentences and getting tough on crime, but not much ever seems to materialize.
    Our clown in chief Boris has recently announced he’s going to be introducing tougher sentences. But I’ll believe that when I see it.

  31. IMO, the US criminal jstice system is hugely problematic.

  32. There are extremely massive injustices in state and federal prisons.

    Many ruined lives that don’t need to be that way.

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