web analytics

MY LAST WILL AND TWITTER TESTAMENT

By David Vance On September 15th, 2020

It was quite a ride!

I joined Twitter in 2009 and was banished from it last week, in 2020.

Here’s a review of all that happened!

Before I talk about the fiery exit, I want to discuss the casual entry.

11 years ago, it seemed a fun and lively place for the exchange of ideas. I liked the humour and had fun during the early years. I got to talk to lots of normal people and the account grew. By 2013, I had over 12,000 followers. As my reputation grew, this kept growing and I started 2020 with 160,000 followers. Along the way, I had highs and lows. The platform attracted anonymous trolls who seemed to spend their sad and empty lives spouting venom and hate. Curiously, it became hard to remove such people and in one instance, I took one individual to the High Court and successfully had him stay away from me for a while. (At the time, the local media reported my win as a defeat, a sign of their gathering jealousy)

I liked to tweet music and over the years I think I must have shared the Elvis Costello back catalogue! I also enjoyed witty banter and quoting Shakespeare and other literary giants. Ironically, my final header to my Twitter account was a quote from Mark Twain;

“When you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect”

Of course, by this time, my views were no longer the majority on Twitter.

Since 2016, after the Trump win and the Brexit vote, Twitter changed. It started to exercise that which you may recognise as cancel culture. More prominent conservative voices were silenced, slowly at first but then with increasing speed. And the method was the same. All you had to do was express an opinion or ask a question (in my case) that the left-wing mob didn’t like and the orchestrated pile-on happens. Twitter safety (from reality) is then besieged by thousands of complaints and this then triggers suspension. 2020 has seen the likes of my friend Katie Hopkins, Stefan Molyneaux and Carl Benjamin erased from the platform – so I am in the best of company.

Let’s talk about the actual tweet that brought my run to an end.

It was a direct question to the Manchester United footballer Marcus Rashford. He had been suggesting that he had “never” met anyone who didn’t care for their children. Now, this may be true of course but please consider what I actually said. I suggested there was a problem in the British Afro-Caribbean community (every census shows this, it is an indisputable fact supported by Government data) with women being sadly abandoned by their boyfriends. This is the community Rashford comes from, so it is a little odd he has never encountered the widespread problem. Further, and this is the kicker, by his OWN admission, his mother brought him and his siblings up without a father. So I asked him the obvious question. Had he met his own father, as a child? If he had, his initial statement is problematical. If he hadn’t, it validates my concern for his community. Either way, I sought information.

Truth told, this was too much for left-wing preening Twitter. It was simply not possible to question Rashford. And so I was defamed en masse and my account was removed. On my final Periscope live stream with barrister Rebecca Butler, we discussed possible solutions to the issue in a positive manner. I actually praised Rashford. But facts don’t matter on Twitter. It is the raw anger of the mob that matters and which decides if you go or if you stay!

Do I miss it? Honestly, no. I will miss some people that I got to know, that’s the bit that is sad. I have known some of them since 2009. But they all have the chance to visit my Parler social media (@DavidVance) if they really want to stay in touch. If they prefer to stay on Twitter, that’s their call. But do I miss the almost satanic levels of hate towards me? No. Do I miss having to edit my words lest a snowflake is triggered? No. It’s not that I am different on Parler or Facebook but I am less self-censoring.

At a deeper level, I think that Twitter is no longer a serious platform for informed debate. Those prominent remaining conservative voices will find that they will be taken down if they speak out. Some stayed mute when I was taken down. That will not save them in the long run. Those who risked their Twitter accounts by standing by me earn my respect. Today it was my account that was erased, but tomorrow, it will be someone else’s.

Here’s the good news.

The air outside Twitter is cleaner. The noise outside Twitter is reduced.

I have more time to do things that interest me. I have a new journey to go on.  I hope you, dear reader, will stick with me. I am only warming up!

As I have said for a long long time, ‘Don’t start me talking”…

If you appreciated this article and would like to support us, would you consider a one-off small donation?
(any currency can be selected)
[asp_product id=”17473″]

33 Responses to “MY LAST WILL AND TWITTER TESTAMENT”

  1. You seem to have left out that after declaring that you were happy to be free of Twitter, you registered https://twitter.com/DVATW2 and even posted a video to prove that it was you. That account was soon banned as well.

  2. Keep being you David.

  3. By his OWN admission, his mother brought him and his siblings up without a father

    I don’t see why in that context you simply couldn’t have asked him if he had met his father and view the further commen as a crude trope. Besides, a cursory Google search states that Rashford’s father acts as his agent.

  4. Hi Fews,

    The account concerned was not set up by me. It had no connection to me. It was not based in the UK, for that matter. If someone wants to set up an account and publish my content, that it NOT against Twitter TOS. So, I suggest you try a little harder. I note your lack of empathy. It would be awful if you were banned.

    Hi Paul,

    Rashford was brought up by his SINGLE mother. His father was absent during those years. My source is Rashford. Rashford said he had never met someone who didn’t care for their children. My question stands

  5. I note your lack of empathy. It would be awful if you were banned.

    You got booted from Twitter, and if we don’t say ‘awww’, we run the risk of being banned from here!? How does that work!?

    I thought your tweet was racist, and evidently so did Twitter. And your explanation above smacks so much of the sour grapes you displayed when the initially ‘good’ people of east Belfast, failed to elect you and became the ‘stupid’ people of east Belfast, engaging in tribal politics.

    Does this mean I’ll be banned?

  6. “The account concerned was not set up by me. It had no connection to me.”

    So can you explain this video?

    https://twitter.com/i/status/1305269597336145920

  7. Fews,

    I am sorry you seem unable to comprehend the english language. I also do not need to “explain” anything to you.

    Seimi,

    Let’s see.

  8. //Rashford was brought up by his SINGLE mother. His father was absent during those years. My source is Rashford. Rashford said he had never met someone who didn’t care for their children//

    Yes, I know that. And as I say above, I don’t see why you couldn’t have asked Rashford about his personal circumstances without introducing a racial aspect to the query.

    My view that the comment was a crude trope also still stands.

  9. I don’t know or understand Twitter, or want to do either, but 160,000 followers sounds like success and, whatever the cause, it seems a pity to lose all that.

    The Rashford exchange doesn’t justify a ban IMO, but bringing his painful background and his parents into an argument was in poor taste, to say the least.

  10. Let’s see? Let’s see what? Whether or not I express empathy, or even sympathy for you, for getting yourself binned from a platform for posting a racist comment?
    That’s not gonna happen.

  11. Seimi,

    It wasn’t racist. Try not to post unsubstantiated garbage. It is very boring.

  12. It wasn’t racist.

    Twitter disagreed.

    Try not to post unsubstantiated garbage.

    I don’t believe that I have. Perhaps you could point to where you think I did?

    It is very boring.

    What is?

  13. // It wasn’t racist.
    Twitter disagreed. //

    Is it racist to make any generalised statement about any ethnic group? Like saying the Swedes are less likely to tell lies than Italians, but Italians are generally more fun and more creative, and that Irish are generally more relaxed than Germans?

    I’m sure there are generalisations we all indulge in every day.

    To say American blacks are more likely to be brought up in single-parent households seems to be more a question of statistics than anything else.

    Even Obama singled out black dads for their relative general lack of loyalty to the mothers of their children.

    “We need fathers to realize that responsibility does not end at conception…. Too many fathers are M.I.A, too many fathers are AWOL, missing from too many lives and too many homes… They have abandoned their responsibilities, acting like boys instead of men. And the foundations of our families are weaker because of it.”
    The comedian Bill Cosby went even further when he spoke frankly about the vast number of black families without a father, and even suggested that some blacks use racism as a way of deflecting criticism of their society.

    Obama was speaking to a large black church congregation when he said that, and they warmly applauded his words.

    It’s absurd to applaud someone for saying something but denounce others for saying exactly the same thing. (I don’t know what David’s motives were in this case) Everyone has the right to speak frankly about facts as he sees them. Denying them that right is IMO tantamount to admitting they are right, and at any rate it does the black community, and especially fatherless black children, no favours by covering this up, as if there weren’t already enough injustices they are born into.

    There is far too little truth being uttered in the world as it is; nobody who denies someone the right to speak it can claim that same right for himself.

  14. “I am sorry you seem unable to comprehend the english language.”

    Here is your quote from above

    “The account concerned was not set up by me. It had no connection to me. ”

    Here is your quote from the video

    “I would encourage those people who enjoy following me and who enjoy my thoughts and opinions to follow this account @DVATW2 to be able to find genuine tweets from me”

    I will leave it as an exercise for the reader to decide whether the @DVATW2 account had no connection to you.

  15. David.

    However you meant your comment, Twitter thought it was racist and banned you.
    I disagree with the ban, but Twitter is a private platform that can do what it likes, just as you can on ATW. But remember, if you start baning people on ATW, you become worse than Twitter, and all of your complaints against them, become meaningless hypocrisy.

  16. Noel,

    “There is far too little truth being uttered in the world as it is”

    The idea that if it’s true it can’t be racist is, um, not true. If every time you see an Indian you go up and say “I love a curry, me” then the fact that you may in fact enjoy a Chicken Madras of a weekend is neither here nor there. People are still going to assume you’re a massive racist and in most cases they wouldn’t go far wrong with such an assumption. And really if they are incorrect that’s still your problem.

  17. The problem with David’s tweet to Marcus Rashford is that it was tactlessly worded. If David has simply asked “Were you raised in a single parent household with little input from your father and do you consider this to be a problem that has particular impact in the black community ?” he might have still got (false) accusations of racism but it would have been a much more justifiable way of posing the question than the way it was done. I would hope that even David would acknowledge he could have phrased it better.

  18. Thank you Noel for your thoughtful response.

    Colm,

    Twitters allow violent militia, paedos and porn on its platform. But I was “tactless” and needed removed. I see,

    Dave Alton,

    ATW is a privately owned platform. Sauce for the goose.

    FewsOrange has gone to spend more time trying to troll me on other platforms.

  19. David

    I don’t think you needed removing for that tweet not at all. I am not on twitter but I have read many twitter threads and people have posted far worse than your tweet . Twitter definitely overreacted to it and were wrong in their judgement.

  20. FewsOrange got kicked??

  21. //The idea that if it’s true it can’t be racist is, um, not true. //

    I never said it was.

    First, I think the truth should be said whether it’s racist or not.

    Second, I think maybe we should all relax a bit about “racism” and be a little more honest and consistent in seeing it in others.

    I’m not sure how accurate the remarks about the high rate of absentee fathers in the black community are, but, in view of the general consensus, let’s assume there is a higher percentage there.

    When Obama specifically addressed black America with the words I quoted above, he seemed at any rate to be confirming that assumption.
    His words were quoted approvingly across the board in the US at the time – in the black community, the NYT and liberal and of course conservative America.

    But were they racist? I think it’s pretty certain that most Americans didn’t consider them racist and thought they were true.
    I also don’t think there’s any doubt that if some white Republican had said the same thing, or said what Cosby said, he would be loudly denounced as a racist and the truth or otherwise of the words would be ignored. I know there’s a difference in whether criticism comes from within the criticised group, but those niceties shouldn’t be allowed stop people speaking frankly.

    People are now watching their words so closely, weighing them in the particular context, checking their audience etc., that a large part of conversation and the media and politics has become completely neurotic. That’s bullshit. Apart from the fact that truth should be more important than fear of censure, how antiseptic political conversation will become when people have been practically struck dumb by all the pitfalls and verbal taboos in several issues.

    I’m sure most of us can remember the days in our youth when we spoke openly about Americans and Catholics and Jews and Blacks and god knows what else, and laughed at jokes about all of them. Many stupid things were of course said, but the discourse was at least enjoyable, much more honest, less hypocritical and probably contained more truth.

  22. I think the comment wrongly introduced race and an attack on a guy who seems to have a genuine charitable success whose goal few could argue with (nutrition for children). Upon reflection one might reconsider what point one was trying to make, and whether it was made in a manner to persuade or to belittle. I don’t think the author was racist but I do think he Made an error. Being technically “right” doesn’t mean being actually right. Twitter is of course overblown and anti-intellectual and the sooner all are off it the better.

  23. Again, every 18 months or so I log onto twitter and immediately log back off when I see how overwhelmingly stupid and inflammatory it can be on all matters relating to politics of any kind

  24. McLuhan said that the medium is the message.

    That’s really, really true with twitter.

    Not exactly a good technology for sober reflection, or reaching any common ground.

    A great technology for incitement, name calling, mocking, delivering the message of the day for the base of a movement.

  25. Dave Alton,

    ATW is a privately owned platform. Sauce for the goose.

    Yes David, and as I said, if you at the same way Twitter has done, then you’re no better than Twitter.

  26. I’m sure most of us can remember the days in our youth when we spoke openly about Americans and Catholics and Jews and Blacks and god knows what else, and laughed at jokes about all of them. Many stupid things were of course said, but the discourse was at least enjoyable, much more honest, less hypocritical and probably contained more truth.

    Yes, and society – generally – was healthier for it. The more that thoughts and language are policed, the more Balkanised and neurotic our relations become.

  27. Thank you mahons and phantom.

    I forget the common sense that abides here.

    BTW I do accept I make mistakes, and sometimes word things incorrectly but as those who know me understand, my aim is true

    Twitter allows paedos, perverts and porn. That is deemed within their TOS.
    I am deemed unsuitable for their TOS. I will take that!

  28. Yes, and society – generally – was healthier for it.

    I’m not sure about that Pete. I have no problem using the words nigger and yid but only to point up how racist those words are. They should never be banned but should always be seen for what they are. Here is a good example from Blazing Saddles:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o7Q4fM5y_1I

  29. //I have no problem using the words nigger and yid but only to point up how racist those words are.//

    I recently made a great reading discovery: By the Waters of Carthage, written by a Manx-Scottish writer called Norma Lorimer. It was published in 1906 and is long out of print and can be read only online (some wonderful American university copied hundreds of old books and made them available to all who register to read. You can also easily download it to your Kindle, but the scan recognition isn’t good and there are loads of errors. Better read the original online. Link on request).

    It’s really a remarkable book by an obviously remarkable woman (about whom you’ll find nothing on Wiki or anywhere else it seems) on her travels through Tunisia. She writes really well, has an incredibly keen eye for detail and description, and a great sense of humour.
    But she spares nobody and nothing. She uses the word “nigger” much more casually than Flashman did, the Arabs are sloppy, the French are dumb and the Jews are ugly, fat and mean. But she also gives praise where due, and her descriptions of the souks, the streets and shops and all the people, especially the beautiful Arab women, she meets are a joy to read. It’s like looking back to a different world to see how freely and casually people used to talk and write (the book is in the form of letters) in the days when you could say what you want, but also a great view of the pre-1914 world and the days when Arabia still held a certain romance and magic for westerners.

  30. Pete

    Yes, and society – generally – was healthier for it. The more that thoughts and language are policed, the more Balkanised and neurotic our relations become.

    Probably for different reasons, but I totally agree with this.
    A healthy society should function with people knowing when something is wrong, not being told it is.

  31. Dave

    That’s a strange view. History is mainly about not caring about things that are wrong because it doesn’t affect them. They only begin to address injustice when other people start speaking out and acting against the status quo often on behalf of weaker groups.

  32. Noel please provide the link to the university….. it sounds like a treasure trove to me.

  33. She uses the word “nigger” much more casually than Flashman did, the Arabs are sloppy, the French are dumb and the Jews are ugly, fat and mean.

    Shocking. Link please!

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.