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I TOLD YOU; DOGS WILL SAVE US

By Pete Moore On September 24th, 2020

Helsinki Airport is trialling sniffer dogs to detect the Wuhan Flu. I am not surprised at the results so far. This is a fascinating thing going on:

In the university’s preliminary tests, dogs – which have been successfully used to detect diseases such as cancer and diabetes – were able to identify the virus with nearly 100% accuracy, even days before before a patient developed symptoms [,,,]

Dogs are also able to identify Covid-19 from a much smaller molecular sample than PCR tests, Helsinki airport said, needing only 10-100 molecules to detect the presence of the virus compared with the 18m needed by laboratory equipment.

They then spoil it by “verifying” the dogs’ response with a hopelessly innaccurate PCR test. We don’t need no PCR test. A wet nose is better.

If “more dogs” isn’t the answer you want then you’re asking the wrong questions. More dogs always makes for better outcomes. I said this months ago and I was serious. What have the government and Public Health England done about it since? Nothing. If I was in charge Heathrow would look like Battersea Dogs Home by now, and no-one with the virus would be getting through.

16 Responses to “I TOLD YOU; DOGS WILL SAVE US”

  1. //A wet nose is better.//

    Yes, but whose?

    Does the dog get to sniff around the face of every passenger arriving?

  2. More dogs always makes for better outcomes.

    As a general rule. Workers, companions, guards, family members, rescuers, disability aids. The most magnificent beasts known to humankind.

    My four year old female German Sheperd agrees too.

  3. Agreed.

    The longer you live, the more you realize how wonderful, how loyal, dogs are.

  4. Helsinki Airport receives high marks from travelers.

    Very efficient, good services.

    Hardly ever closes for long despite the snow it gets.

  5. I’m sitting here now, with my 2 year old mutt beside me, and we also agree. Dogs are the best. Even Herself, who had never owned a dog before, and who complains endlessly about all the hairs around the place, admits that she couldn’t imagine our family without him in it.

  6. Does the dog get to sniff around the face of every passenger arriving?

    No, they use a skin swab which the dog sniffs in a small box. The results are very promising.

  7. More dogs always makes for better outcomes.

    The most magnificent beasts known to humankind.

    The longer you live, the more you realize how wonderful, how loyal, dogs are.

    Not always.

    https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2020/sep/15/two-people-arrested-after-dog-kills-12-day-old-baby-in-doncaster

  8. Not always.

    Nope, of course not Dave, that’s why I said as a general rule. But pointing to sporadic dog attacks is akin to stating the human race are barabarians because of people like Tde Bundy, Hitler, Charles Manson etc.

    The most magnificent beasts known to humankind.

    I think that point still stands.

  9. https://allthatsinteresting.com/hachiko-dog

  10. Ultimately one of my big coronavirus worries is what happens when I have to go back to the office. I’ve been working from home the entire time and while a return to the office is not likely at the moment it may be at some point in time. And my dogs have gotten very used to me being here every day. And the big one gets a bit of separation anxiety. So I’m worried that when I go back to the office that it will cause him a lot of anxiety.

  11. These 10 – 100 molecules are not unique to the deadly, killer virus which is wiping out humanity. This means that the dogs would be detecting anything and there is no template to calibrate their findings.

  12. Nope, of course not Dave, that’s why I said as a general rule. But pointing to sporadic dog attacks is akin to stating the human race are barabarians because of people like Tde Bundy, Hitler, Charles Manson etc.

    Putting aside the fact that it could be argued that human race isn’t particularly nice to their fellow man, your example is a silly one and not relevant to the point I was making. I was merely pointing out that dogs aren’t necessarily the wonderful beasts people here are making them out to be, and that’s from a dog lover. And dog attacks certainly aren’t ‘sporadic’.

    Around 4.5 million Americans are bitten by dogs every year, resulting in the hospitalization of 6,000 to 13,000 people each year in the United States (2005).

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_fatal_dog_attacks_in_the_United_States#:~:text=Typically%2C%20between%2030%20and%2050,the%20United%20States%20(2005).

  13. Allan

    These 10 – 100 molecules are not unique to the deadly, killer virus which is wiping out humanity. This means that the dogs would be detecting anything and there is no template to calibrate their findings.

    You’re such an expert on everything Allan. Surely it’s only a matter of time before you get that Nobel prize.

  14. S

    In the runup to the return to the office, you may want to be out of the house a lot more than usual.

    I may be able to return to the normal office part time in October.

    The virus is well suppressed in NYC, there is no reason not to do it.

  15. The Northern Ireland Executive never lifted the work from home if you can order, while the UK Government did but have no reinstated it. So it will likely be a while here.

    But yeah in the run up I’ll have to put stuff in place to almost acclimatise the dog to me being out of the house again.

  16. You’re such an expert on everything Allan. Surely it’s only a matter of time before you get that Nobel prize.

    No Dave – it’s just fundamental chemistry. Here is the inventor of the Polymerase Chain Reaction test, Kary Mullis, who won the Nobel Prize and who is explaining exactly why it cannot be used for detection of pathogens

    https://youtu.be/FHx059IqP_M

    So Dave, does this do it for you? Does the actual scientist make it clear to you why the PCR test cannot be used as a medical tool? if not, would you state what the insufficiency is and I’ll attempt to bridge that gap