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Let it Begin….

By Patrick Van Roy On November 27th, 2020

The Christmas Season has officially begun!

43 Responses to “Let it Begin….”

  1. Bah Humbug !

  2. you are supposed to say “And God bless us Everyone”…. Tiny Tim

  3. Allah be praised 🙂

  4. Advent is the first day of Christmas season

    Advent begins on Sunday

  5. Christmas begins the first time each year I hear Mariah’s swinging festive ditty on the radio 🙂

  6. Black Friday begins Christmas.

    except this year no one is going into the black.

    I love advent calenders, a piece of chocolate a day.

  7. Amazon is making money hand over fist all year long

  8. 70 Billion plus Bezos himself profited this year I read, and mom and pop down the street whose business is closed from covid is on welfare.

  9. I love advent calenders, a piece of chocolate a day.

    I’d love an Advent wine rack calendar. A bottle each day will do me for December. Hic 🙂

  10. Most retail places are open. Including bookstores department stores restaurants barbers and gyms

    Blame the mask shirking and , covid denying ignoranti for any localized closures in some places

    They have long been 100% responsible. We know what works , they refuse to do it, putting twisted truther politics above the health of their neighbor

  11. Phantom you don’t believe 100s of thousands of small businesses around the world haven’t been destroyed?

    I assigned no blame, I just stated fact.

    Today is not Black Friday for the majority of small businesses in the western world. This year there will be no Black any day.

    That is the fact of the situation. Now you can deny it all you want but the 100s of thousands whose family business is just no more isn’t.

  12. Let’s remember the true roots and meaning of Christmas, (before the Christians hijacked it), and praise Odin and the Pagan Gods. With wine!

  13. that’s one way for sure Dave

  14. This year there will be no Black any day.

    Racist ! 🙂

  15. lol….

  16. Very many small businesses are living day to day, or have been crushed already

    It’ remains a dangerous time

    Everyone who can assist small business should do so. I am doing that now, having “ adopted “ several small places near me, who I visit more than before.

  17. Here we are on the verge of opening up for the month of December, on a graduated basis, while in the 6 counties they are closing down. Crazy, foolish, self-defeating car crash of an approach from both jurisdictions.

    I have said from the start that Covid is one thing I’ll cut the government some slack on. Nobody was had to govern in these circumstances before and some errors are understandable. But when you look at what a country like Australia has been able to do… you do really have to question the approach in Ireland, UK, most of Europe and the US. And that’s not even mentioning how well somewhere like Vietnam or Taiwan has fared.

  18. reasonable view Petr

  19. Black Friday begins Christmas.

    Well, it certainly kicks off the consumerist feeding frenzy, anyway.

    Praise Odin and the Pagan Gods. With wine!

    All hail Bacchus!!

  20. Taiwan was again perfect from the get go

    The world should be studying them closely

    The US had the information that they needed. But they had bad leadership at the top, and a truculent population that refused to listen to the science, a science that got sorted well enough by the early spring

  21. while in the 6 counties

    Do you mean Northern Ireland? If so, why not use the name of the state, or do you also refer to the Republic of Ireland as “the 26 counties” and football and rugby as “garrison games”?

  22. It’s been ages since we had a good old Ulster/6 counties row.

    Come on Petr, strike back. The ball’s in your court 😊

  23. If so, why not use the name of the state

    Perhaps he doesn’t recognise nor agree with the state?

    And football and rugby as “garrison games”?

    Is boxing also a ‘garrison game?’

    There you are, Colm.

  24. Marvellous, now if only we could get the likes of Chris Gaskin, Madradin Ruad,Logical Unionist, New Yorker, Andrew Mc Cann and other old timers on to this thread it would be the good old days back again 😇

  25. Perhaps he doesn’t recognise nor agree with the state?

    On that reckoning, Pete Moore should be referring to the USA as the 13 colonies. And Iran would still be Persia, as it is to Patrick, to be fair. And Israel would still be Palestine, as it is to some of the Corbynites and other Jew-haters, to be fair.

    But in the real world that most of us inhabit, the official names of legally recognised states are accepted, even if we don’t agree with them. Call it grudging respect for reality, or something. It’s encouraging that 100 years after partition, nearly all Dublin politicians have no problem with referring to Northern Ireland by its correct name. Apart from the usual suspects of course.

    As for “garrison games”, I forgot to mention cricket. Martin McGuinness was a keen player in his youth.

  26. Pete & Dublin politicians etc can refer to whatever they like, it’s really none of my (and possibly Petr’s?), business.

    I absolutely accept that two states were formed from the partition of Ireland as reality but why should you expect me and others like me to forget the injustice of partition and buy into your normalcy of ‘whats done is done’ by legitimising that injustice?

    As for the ‘garrison games’ strowman. You seem to defeat whatever point it was you were trying to make with your last sentence?

  27. I absolutely accept that two states were formed from the partition of Ireland as reality but why should you expect me and others like me to forget the injustice of partition and buy into your normalcy of ‘whats done is done’ by legitimising that injustice?

    Paul, I accept that you consider partition an injustice. But after 100 years most people have moved on, at least to the extent of accepting that “the six counties” is no longer an appropriate designation, any more than “the twenty-six counties” is.

    As for the ‘garrison games’ strawman. You seem to defeat whatever point it was you were trying to make with your last sentence?

    I was just pointing out the archaic bigotry of the “garrison games” label. Which I believe was still heard in Shinner and GAA circles within recent times?

  28. Patrick

    That Bob Hope scene has got to be the most shameless schmaltzy scene that ever came out of Hollywood. Here is the best scene from Casablanca as a corrective (no, not that one):

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9l_3AM_fncs

  29. Peter, I absolutely disagree with the NI state and the almost four fifths ROI as unnatural and while I recognise that they exist I won’t legitimise either by ‘moving on’ and accepting the injustice with ‘what’s done is done’ nor the contrived rubbish of some ‘Northern Irsh’ nationality and the ‘four nations’ of the UK. There are hundreds of thousands like me too.

    You introduced the ‘garrison games’ strawman into the equation. It’s certainly not my thinking (nor would it seem it was MMcG’s)

  30. Paul

    The Irish Taoiseach Micheal Martin (of De-Valera’s party) has no problem referring to Northern Ireland by its legal name. But of course you are in the Shinner camp, which will never sell out like that, not ever. I get it.

  31. As I said Peter, what and how others refer to is their own business.

    I won’t legitimise an injustice by normalising it. If you label that ‘selling out’ and by extension, Micheal Martin as a ‘sell out’ then that’s your own business too.

  32. Paul

    Micheal Martin has no problem with the legal name of the state known as Northern Ireland. But Gerry Adams and Mary Lou McDonald and Michelle O’Neill (I think that’s the current pecking order if we ignore the “Army Council”) and the rest of the Shinner gang most certainly have a problem. And presumably they always will have?

  33. Probably, and hundreds of thousands of others too.

    And?

  34. It’s funny the things that annoy people. Petr writes about the misjudged handling of the pandemic by the authorities in both jurisdictions in Ireland which could cause thousands of extra infections and Peter completely ignoring the substance of the comment gets hung up on a two word name used in the comment !

  35. It’s curious that Northern Ireland, though politically unstable, has always had the one stable name since it was formed, a generation earlier than the Republic.

    The rest of the country, on the other hand, has always had a bit of a problem with its name. It was the Free State, the 26 Counties, Eire, the Republic, the Republic of Ireland or even, for the pedants, its real name “Ireland”, which as a name excludes a huge part of the island. So if people bother about names, I’d say then this term “Ireland”, or using the name for the whole as a name for only a part, is the thing to get engaged with.

    There were many mistakes made on all sides in 1921: Unionists, the Ulster Catholic minority, willing Free Staters, Republicans and of course the British, all made mistakes that would, I hope, not be made by a more politically mature generation today.

    Probably the most serious mistakes were allowing Unionists carve up the new province and incorporate large areas with a Catholic majority. This ensured that the disenchanted minority would always remain above the critical mass necessary for threatening the state, which in turn fed the sectarianism that already existed there and ensured continuing political conservativism.

    On the southern side, the big mistake was allowing the Dictatorship of Maynooth.
    Ultimately, Irish nationalism had the choice between insisting on a pluralist, forward thinking state for the entire island or going for a narrow, cozy Catholic state for 4 fifths of the country. They chose the latter, and not only because the first wasn’t available anyway. In Ireland, the Pope always had more divisions than the Republic

  36. A shamrock by any other name…

    As Shakespeare might have said had he been Irish 😊

  37. So if people bother about names, I’d say then this term “Ireland”, or using the name for the whole as a name for only a part, is the thing to get engaged with.

    When I use the term ‘Ireland’ it is to refer to the singular unit.

    What you say above is a sound enough summary. I’ll never understand the madness that possessed the Boundry Commission to include places like Derry City in the fledgling state, cutting it off from its natural Donegal hinterland and for centuries South Armagh had the name of a rogues paradise. That being the case I always thought it was a stupid place to put a border:

    The main highway from the north of this Kingdom from Dundalk to Armagh passes through the fastness of the Fews. To the traveller it is not safe as Tories [highwaymen] and rogues infest the woods. Here it was that Captain Groves and 10 of his men were done to death in the past year

    – Sir William Robinson, 1688

  38. Peter I love Casablanca but as to your scene…. F the French

    This is the best scene

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SjbPi00k_ME&ab_channel=lesatseaside

  39. //I’ll never understand the madness that possessed the Boundry Commission to include places like Derry City in the fledgling state, cutting it off from its natural Donegal hinterland//

    Paul, the Irish border – including at Derry – wasn’t drawn by the Boundary Commission, which didn’t meet till 1924, but by the British Govt at the behest of Ulster Unionists back in 1920, even before the Truce and Treaty.

    When deciding on the border, the Brit. Govt heard only the opinion of Ulster Unionists, who had a very strong position after being part of the War Cabinet, and to a much lesser extent from the nationalist IPP, which had been completely depleted after the SF victory in 1918 and which, everyone knew, now represented nobody.
    Sinn Fein, which represented nationalist Ireland, was not consulted.

    So Unionists got their way. They could even have got all of Ulster (which would have meant my parents, and probably I too, being born in the UK), which London offered, but Craig for the Unionists insisted on the 6-county state as it was, he said, the greatest area of territory that Unionism could hold.
    It was a total stitch-up: Unionists got large areas of territory (counties Tyrone and Fermanagh, and cities of Derry and Newry) that had just sworn their allegiance to Dail Eireann) and did not take more only because that would upset the sectarian balance.

    The boundary commission also, when it finally met four years later, also favoured Unionism. The argument for Derry remaining in NI was the same, or the reverse, of what you say: if it belonged to the Free State its natural hinterland in Co Derry and Tyrone would be lost. It was felt the city had stronger economic ties to these counties than to Donegal. The people of Derry had no say in the matter.
    But it mattered nothing: the BC recommendations were ignored and the 1920 border stayed. Now 100 years later, the whole project – maintaining a protestant majority in as large a territory as possible – has finally failed.

  40. Paul, the Irish border – including at Derry – wasn’t drawn by the Boundary Commission, which didn’t meet till 1924

    I didn’t mean that the border was drawn by the BC. I meant that the permanence of the delineation was unofficially ratified by it, hence the use of ‘fledgeling state’

    The argument for Derry remaining in NI was the same, or the reverse, of what you say: if it belonged to the Free State its natural hinterland in Co Derry and Tyrone would be lost. It was felt the city had stronger economic ties to these counties than to Donegal. The people of Derry had no say in the matter.

    I didn’t make that argument at all. What I refer to in the case of Derry & SA is having such large pockets of militant Irish nationalism so close to the border.

    Of course it was a total stitch up & favoured unionism.

  41. //I didn’t mean that the border was drawn by the BC. I meant that the permanence of the delineation was officially ratified by it//

    It didn’t ratify anything. It’s report was never issued and AFAIK never even completed. After a leak, the BC was ignored and the matter was instead finally “resolved” by a separate agreement between the Dublin and London governments which sort of saw the Free State trade off its claim to nationalists areas in NI in return for the UK dropping claims for financial compensation for leaving. The Nationalists of the north were almost literally “sold out” by Cosgrave’s govt.

    //I didn’t make that argument at all. //

    I thought you were referring to Derry’s natural Donegal hinterland as a factor when you said “I’ll never understand the madness that possessed the Boundry Commission to include places like Derry City in the fledgling state, cutting it off from its natural Donegal hinterland”

  42. It didn’t ratify anything.

    I know it didn’t, well not offically anyway:

    I meant that the permanence of the delineation was unofficially ratified by it

    I thought you were referring to Derry’s natural Donegal hinterland as a factor

    I was but it was a secondary to the factor of militant Irish nationalism so close to a border, hence my comparison of Derry City & South Armagh.

  43. Peter — I’m a life long anti-imperialist. Sometimes I have to say Northern Ireland in work but I avoid where possible. I have many friends throughout Ireland and see all as equals. Even as a blow-in, I have seen much more of the 6 counties than most people from south of the border.. mostly by bike.