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ISRAEL HITS A BULLSEYE

By Pete Moore On November 27th, 2020

“Remember that name – Fakhrizadeh.”

That was Benjamin Netanyahoo in April 2018, describing Iran’s atomic weapons programme. Today the nuclear scientist Mohsen Fakhrizadeh was assassinated near Tehran. He’s not the first Iranian nuclear scientist to check out early and violently either.

There’ll be no mea culpas from the perpetrators and we don’t need one.

13 Responses to “ISRAEL HITS A BULLSEYE”

  1. Ah yes, the old when is terrorism not terrorism argument.

  2. It’s a ‘pre emptive strike’ or something, Colm.

  3. Typical, just when one of Allan’s “it was the Jews wot did it “ posts would have a rare veracity , he’s not around 😊

  4. It seems the world turns a blind eye to Israel secretly developing nuclear weapons, as well as turning a blind eye to Israel stopping anybody else doing the same.

  5. This was an Israeli hit-job for sure although they will deny it. But it would not have gone ahead without sanction from Trump. And the Saudis were probably in the loop. The target would soon have been the Robert Oppenheimer of Iran. Here is an informed take on the background:

    “First there was intense speculation that Trump was building up to a last-minute attack on Iran. It lasted for a news cycle, but never transpired. It may be that he opted to give the nod to an assassination instead. Then the US Special Representative on Iran, Elliott Abrams, met the Israeli Prime Minister earlier this month to discuss a laundry list of new sanctions to be slapped on Iran. And during Mike Pompeo’s whistle-stop tour of the Middle East, he became the first secretary of state to visit a West Bank settlement – and convened a secret summit in Saudi Arabia with Benjamin Netanyahu…

    One afternoon in 2016 while I was on a story in Paris, I received a phone call from an Iranian dissident who wanted to pass me details of a covert Revolutionary Guards’ headquarters in Damascus. Codenamed the Glasshouse, the five-storey building was described as the nerve centre from which Tehran’s military chiefs controlled tens of thousands of Iranian troops and mercenaries from Iraq, Afghanistan and Pakistan. The former hotel, located near the airport, housed intelligence and counterintelligence departments, a foreign militia command, a propaganda unit and a medical clinic. There were also subterranean vaults holding millions of dollars in cash, flown in regularly from Tehran to a nearby airstrip codenamed ‘Muhammad Ali’.

    As I checked the claims with intelligence sources, it became clear that the Glasshouse spoke volumes about the theocracy’s swaggering assertiveness. At the time, Iran was riding high. Flush with sanctions dollars released by Obama’s nuclear deal, its troops and proxies were crawling all over Syria. The beleaguered Assad had been reduced to a state of dependency, deferring to Revolutionary Guard commanders on strategic and operational decisions…”

    https://www.spectator.co.uk/article/joe-biden-and-the-revival-of-iran

  6. //The target would soon have been the Robert Oppenheimer of Iran.//

    Hmmmm As he wasn’t the first scientist to be assassinated, the Iranians must have assumed he could be the next to go and no doubt impressed on him the need to get his knowledge into the heads of younger scientists and technicians. I doubt if this is such a major setback; if Iran is indeed pursuing nuclear weapons, the problem in that field is always the technology and resources, not so much the know-how.

    It’s hardly comparable to the 1940s when the plausibility or otherwise of atomic bombs had never been demonstrated and you needed some forceful individual to drive the programme.

  7. If it was Mossad bloody good. Few more need taking out. Get to it. Can I make a donation towards costs?

  8. It’s hardly comparable to the 1940s

    Of course not. The comparison is in the sense that Oppenheimer was the father of the US atomic bombs in 1945 and this guy would have been the father of the Iran bombs in about 2022. If he had lived.

    I doubt if this is such a major setback;

    Maybe not. But who will want to fill the dead man’s shoes, given the repeated failures of the Iranian regime to protect these guys? The Israelis have killed at least six of them since 2010.

  9. “But who will want to fill the dead man’s shoes, given the repeated failures of the Iranian regime to protect these guys?”

    A bit of patriotism, combined with the Iranians being the ‘make them an offer they can’t refuse’ types, will fill it pretty quickly.

  10. A bit of patriotism

    No doubt, but will he be as good as the dead guy? The Iran bomb has been delayed for sure. And their economy is totally ****ed thanks to Trump, much as I hate to give that bastard any credit for anything:

    https://www.spectator.co.uk/writer/jake-wallis-simons

  11. I’d say, personally, this has little to do with delaying the Iranian bomb – though that may be of side benefit to whoever did this – presumably the Israelis. I think this was not so much a shot against Iran but more a shot against Joe Biden. This is Netanyahu (most likely) trying to cause so much disruption that any peace deal between the United States and Iran is unacceptable to either side. Because while an aggressive, heavily armed Iran is a threat to Israel, a more peaceful, less aggressive Iran is a threat to Binyamin Netanyahu.

  12. Can I make a donation towards costs?

    Absolutely. Just post your contact and bank details here and we’ll be onto it immediately.

  13. Seamus

    Because while an aggressive, heavily armed Iran is a threat to Israel, a more peaceful, less aggressive Iran is a threat to Binyamin Netanyahu.

    I hadn’t thought of it like that before, but what you say makes perfect sense.