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BRITAIN LEADS THE WAY

By Pete Moore On December 2nd, 2020

The UK has become the first country in the world to approve the Pfizer/BioNTech coronavirus vaccine, paving the way for mass vaccination.

Britain’s medicines regulator, the MHRA, says the jab, which offers up to 95% protection against Covid-19 illness, is safe to be rolled out.

With a swish of his quill Boris approves the junk. This is a proper Brexit bonus this is. Thanks to Brexiteers we could get moving while the Euro Johnnies are still hanging around. The French are probably on the Christmas holidays already, so they’ll be hanging around for some time yet. Don’t argue, that’s confirmed by the Germans. The first vaccinations are next week. I suggest a proper British roll out, i.e. “after you”. Let the fat nurses and the BAMES have it. They’ve droned on all year about how the Chinese Virus is so deadly to them. Ok, you first then. Me? Nah, I’m as fit as a fiddle and in no rush. Maybe one day if I’m looking to kill a bit of time. I’m not saying it’s dangerous. It’s the other one you want to avoid. That’s the one with Bill Gates’ mind-altering nanobots. But let’s not go on about that or the kooks will pile in.

 

37 Responses to “BRITAIN LEADS THE WAY”

  1. You can thank the EU for that.

    Huzzah!

  2. A German company invents something that is produced by an American company and Britain therefore leads the way?

    Well all righty then

  3. “With a swish of his quill Boris approves the junk. This is a proper Brexit bonus this is. Thanks to Brexiteers we could get moving while the Euro Johnnies are still hanging around.”

    Nothing to do with Brexit though. Let’s start with the obvious point – because of the transition period the UK is still governed by EU law. If what Britain was doing was against EU law then they wouldn’t be able to do it now. So the decision to leave the EU is irrelevant to the law on this matters – which allows individual member states to ignore EU law on medicines in national health emergencies. So it was EU law, not UK law, that allowed the UK to do what it did.

    Secondly the decision to collectively develop the vaccine programme was voluntary. So the decision to opt out of it, by the UK, was also voluntary. The UK, post-Brexit, could have joined the vaccine programme, while the UK, pre-Brexit (or without Brexit), could have opted out.

    This has absolutely 100% nothing to do with Brexit.

  4. This is where Pete got it from:

    The UK was the first country to sign a deal with Pfizer/BioNTech – now we will be the first to deploy their vaccine

    To everyone involved in this breakthrough: thank you

    In years to come, we will remember this moment as the day the UK led humanity’s charge against this disease

    https://twitter.com/AlokSharma_RDG/status/1334031199535325185

    The only difference is that the fool helping to steer the UK above hasn’t got his tongue in his cheek like Pete has.

  5. So the Germans produce the vaccine and they’re allowing us to try first. (We are still part of the EU after all.) So thumbs up for the EU.

  6. Paul –

    I’ll give you a clue where I got it from – I linked to it in the post.

    GERMAN HEALTH MINISTER: BREXIT ENABLED EARLIER BRITISH VACCINE ROLLOUT

  7. @Tom Harwood

    There had been some ambiguity in existing rules around emergency authorisation of unlicensed medicines, so the Govt changed the law last month (https://legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2020/1125/introduction/made).

    Thanks to Brexit, UK law now makes it explicitly clear the UK can approve a vaccine before the EU’s EMA does.

    That, old chums, is what a sovereign, independent and self-governing country can do. We are taking back control.

  8. This would be ( really ) a good thing, but you still have a zillion unresolved human and business things to sort out.

  9. Great, the UK can now approve a vaccine before the EU’s EMA does.

    Don’t worry, when the shit hits the fan with WTO tariffs, negotiating trade deals, potential job losses etc perhaps the UK can just ‘slide across to another ring’

  10. There are a lot of continentals working in the UK but there are more than a few Brits working in the EU too. That now becomes harder.

    Also, I read recently of British owners of second homes in say Spain or France who may not be able to spend more than 90 days in a row at the second home without getting a visa unless there is a deal on it. These aren’t necessarily ” rich ” people by any means, a number of them are retired, and they may now face restrictions. Which can also impact the economy of the host countries concerned.

    Wow is this all complicated.

  11. EU law, which in this case still applies in the UK, says that a pre-registered drug can be used on individuals who are dangerously ill, sort of as a last resort. Thus Remdesivir was used by the UK, and throughout Europe, on hospitalised Covid partients as early as last April.
    But in this case you are using the vaccine on healthy people, and – as far as I understand it – the UK would normally have to wait (only about another 2 weeks) until final test results are in and the drug has been approved as a vaccine. A mRNA type vaccine like this has never been used on humans before; it was developed over 10 months from scratch, when the same process normally takes 10 years. I’d say it’s most likely safe, but when you’re dealing with something that could have very severe long-term side-effects it’s better to be a bit safer.

    BTW, the vaccine supplies are being shipped to the UK from – yes, Belgium. Just as well they’re getting over now and they might have been held up at ports if sent after Brexit kicks in.

  12. People like these?

    https://inews.co.uk/news/brexit/brexit-latest-news-expats-spain-vote-leave-regret-decision-256841

    Brexit voters who voted to be non-EU citizens outraged at being treated like non EU citizens?

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9000815/Furious-British-expats-blast-EUs-new-post-Brexit-travel-rules.html

    Wow is this all complicated

    It’s only just begun.

  13. //and they may now face restrictions. Which can also impact the economy of the host countries concerned.
    Wow is this all complicated.//

    I know plenty of English people here who’ve been living in Germany for a long time. Without a single exception, all have applied for German passports over the past two years.

  14. From what I can make out, a no-deal Brexit is now a strong favourite. The gap between the two sides on fisheries is still a mile wide. The French EU have offered to reduce their catch of cod in UK waters by 18%. This is an improvement on their original offer of 0% but the UK is demanding a minimum of 50%, which could be phased over several years. The French EU have refused to budge and it will soon be time for tents to be packed and customs posts to be manned.

  15. Wow is this all complicated.

    It’s not complicated, Phantom. We only want for ourselves what you take for granted as an American. Nothing more, nothing less.

  16. I’ve got three mates here from the south of England Noel who’ve all been married to local women here over 20 years. As I speak their application for Spanish nationality is being processed.

    Although they hope it won’t come to it they’re prepared to renounce their British passport if that’s what’s required.

  17. Pete

    You keep thinking that I’m hostile to Brexit if I point out any problems with it. Big error.

    Do you see any downsides to any British people or to any British companies from a no deal Brexit?

  18. Why would renouncing a British passport be any consideration?

    Spain allows dual citizenship I believe ( So does the US ).

    Renouncing the citizenship of the former country is not required here, as it once was.

    I mentioned this before – I know someone with three passports – US, Israeli, Iranian. Top that.

  19. //Although they hope it won’t come to it they’re prepared to renounce their British passport if that’s what’s required.//

    It’s peculiar that there’s no uniform EU law on dual nationality for EU citizens within the EU.
    In Germany, EU citizens can retain their former nationality while they get German. But in Spain, I believe, they give the same right only to people from Latin America and Portugal, not to other EU citizens living in Spain. It’s absolutely no problem in Ireland, including for people from non-EU countries. While some other EU states don’t allow dual nationality for anyone at all.

  20. But in Spain, I believe, they give the same right only to people from Latin America and Portugal

    I’m unaware of that arrangement with Portugal, (which of course doesn’t mean it doesn’t exist).

    If you’re an EU member nationality living in another EU member country, (as we are), I don’t see why anyone would want to acquire another nationality anyway.

    Spain allows dual citizenship I believe ( So does the US )

    Spain allows dual EU citizenship up to 18 where the person then has to choose one passport, although they can alternate between passports when one expires.

  21. That absurd jingoistic statement from the Business secretary was so cringing and pathetic , a desperate attempt at snatching fake idiotic narrow nationalist glory from an international collaboration. Shameful and childish.

  22. Jesus Christ, and this buffoon is in charge of education?:

    https://www.irishtimes.com/news/world/uk/covid-19-uk-getting-vaccine-first-because-it-is-a-much-better-country-1.4426494?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter

  23. If the UK Education Secretary really said that, he’s an imbecile.

    These are serious times for the UK and they need for serious people to be in these positions.

  24. Oh, he said it alright:

    https://www.standard.co.uk/news/uk/gavin-williamson-better-country-france-belgium-america-lbc-radio-b149603.html

  25. I shall imagine that the British Trump supporters will think that those were very clever comments.

    Because undisciplined shock-jockery trumps diplomacy, right?

  26. Pete, your struggle is real.

    https://mobile.twitter.com/localnotail/status/1334227933267963909

  27. Yet another example of the Trumpisation of British politics. What an absolute fool. “We have the best people”, while …

    https://www.itv.com/news/2020-11-27/covid-how-10-million-doses-of-the-pfizer-vaccine-will-be-delivered-from-belgium-to-a-syringe-near-you

  28. the Trumpisation of British politics

    Exactly.

    Trump would exemplify the exact opposite of traditional British values as respects leadership and masculine demeanor. Why would any British person choose to be influenced by such a character?

    You need yourselves a little more Churchill, a little less ” The Apprentice “.

  29. And speaking of Belgium,…

    Just to show that the most blatant right.wing hypocrisy isn’t confined to US politics. yesterday a leading Hungarian right-wing politician Jozef Szajer, a close ally of Viktor Orban, was arrested by Belgian police while trying to escape from a mass superspreader event of a gay sex party with two dozen men.

    Normally, that would just be good for a laugh, but Szajer is also the author of Hungary’s very conservative new constitution, which provides for special protection for “the institution of marriage as between a man and a woman” and “the family as the basis of the survival of the nation”.

    He is supposed to have drafted the constitution on his iPad.
    Knowing these right-wingers, we shouldn’t be surprised if he wrote those words about the wonder of the man-woman family during a dull hour in a gay sauna.

  30. Another vaccine Brexit jingoist being taken to task:

    Anna McMorrin(Labour MP) calls out Tom Hunt(Tory MP) for spreading more fake news about brexit & the vaccine.

    Anna McMorrin – “We’re acting under EU Law until the 31st of December.”

    https://twitter.com/Haggis_UK/status/1334485265025536000

  31. Phantom –
    Do you see any downsides to any British people or to any British companies from a no deal Brexit?

    Yes, some will lose out. Some through bad luck, some through bureaucratic and political deal making and some who are grifters who profited from us being under the EU yoke. But many more will benegot.

    Why should 95 per cent of British companies have to comply with EU rules when they don;t export to the EU? We now have the opportunity to radically deregulate and fly.

    I hope you remember, every 4th July, all those who lost out in 1776.

  32. Oh, and Gavin Williamson is right.

  33. Exports to the EU and or export operations that get economy of scale by being linked closely to that ecosystem aren’t an important part of the UK manufacturing and other economy?

    You seem to be so committed to Brexit that you never wish to see any downside to it.

    You always want to speak clearly about the bad as well as the good keemosabee.

  34. Jeez, gas lamp operators lost out when electricity came along. Yes, some will lose out. I’ve said that. But more will benefit.

    Yes, I do think you’re hostile to us regaining our sovereignty, independence and self-determination. You’ve pointed out many problems but never any benefits, nor have you congratulated us. Yes, you’re hostile. I wouldn’t care if we didn’t want what you take for granted. It doesn’t look good.

  35. The business community in your most important industries doesn’t share your thoughts. They are very concerned.

    And there’s a site called A Tangled Web that you may wish to take a look at.

    That’s exactly how hostile I was, then. Before the big vote.

    But I try to see the downside as well as the benefit to any new venture. I don’t think that any of you supporters did any of that, and that your comments prior to the vote would show that.

    You saw only lollipop trees.

  36. You clearly have no idea what was said if that’s your recollection.

  37. You clearly have no idea what was said if that’s your recollection.

    My recollection was that before the referendum some here said that the EU was not the EEA, that Britain wasn’t leaving the EEA and if things got rough Britain would just ‘slide over to another circle?’