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THE CASE FOR REPARATIONS

By Pete Moore On December 3rd, 2020

China gave us 2020 and is coming out of it rather well. While the rest of the world is bust the Chinese economy is actually growing. It’s astonishing how little the world is talking of what the Chinese Communist Party did and how much everyone else is suffering for it. It’s not the first virus which the CCP has allowed to escape into the rest of the world either. Somehow it came through this one without a vaccine, to the point where they taunt the world about the great shape they are in. At the very least, in my opinion, Western governments should be recalling all diplomatic staff and ceasing relations until the CCP comes clean and stumps up big.

The case for reparations is overwhelming and the fabulous Douglas Murray puts it well in this week’s Speccie. Do give it a read –

16 Responses to “THE CASE FOR REPARATIONS”

  1. The Spectator is a reasonably serious magazine so this is probably worth a read.

    “We still do not know whether the Wuhan lab was the source of the virus or whether the bat-eating story is true. Both are plausible.”

    Oh well, never mind.

  2. Pete

    I read that piece earlier today and Murray makes a good case for China’s obvious moral culpability in killing hundreds of thousands and wrecking the lives of millions with this virus, whether it was accidental or deliberate.

    But there is one small problem which it doesn’t even begin to address, namely how the **** could any reparations (1) be adjudicated (2) by whom (the UN? LOL) and (3) be enforced? As I have posted before, we need to stop buying stuff from China and there should be a 100% embargo on Chinese investment into the UK in any shape or form, including universities. The decision to ban Huawei from our telecoms networks should just be the start.

  3. I was in Slovenia again two weeks ago and hiked around a bit. Like so many other E European countries, SLO has still not completely recovered from the economic disaster they had until the early 1990s. But the people are sturdy and hard-working and up to last year you could see new businesses emerging everywhere and feel the general mood of optimism. But now almost every village I came to reflected some shade of gloom. Everywhere small stores boarded up and family businesses closed. It’s hard to guess how many livelihoods have been destroyed and how family life has been disrupted by this pandemic.

    So even in these remote corners of Europe everything looks closed and half asleep. It struck me that Corona has had the economic effect of a significant war. Something that started in one country before its destructive power overflowed into hundreds of others. Most wars have only a regional effect, but Corona affects everywhere from Alaska to Australia, Japan to Argentina.

    There’s no doubt that China bears a huge responsibility for all that loss. If the pandemic emerged from, say, a developed European country, you can be sure that that country would be on its knees in contrition for years.

    China has shown little and done less in that regard. Last I heard is that they’re knocking the Aussies for something said down under. As usual, level of guilt all depends on how much power and $$ you have.

  4. each country is responsible for its own response to the Corona virus, it may have been first identified in China but that does not explain the lack of response in the rest of the world. China locked down hard and got ahead of it, turnip refused to even acknowledge it was a problem until it was completely out of control

  5. Last I heard is that they’re knocking the Aussies for something said down under.

    Yes Noel. Australia’s crime was to lead the calls for a proper investigation into how the virus got started. Since then the Chinese have slapped huge tariffs on all Australian products, most recently 300% on wine for which China is the biggest market.

    They are now behaving like playground bullies. For all his faults, Trump was right to single them out for a trade war.

  6. Noel –

    Interesting about Slovenia, which I imagine has some cracking walking. I’ve been promising myself a visit to the Julian Alps for years. This pandemic has somewhat motivated me to do all those sort of things when we’re back.

    Peter –

    There can be no fair arbitrator of reparations and China would ignore it anyway. Only Western governments, acting in concert, could take significant action and that won’t happen.

  7. Pete

    I can recommend Slovenia. We had a lovely holiday there just after the Yugoslav war ended and I got a good education from one of our hosts on what evil bastards the Serbs really were. I have to admit it still influences me.

  8. Trump was right to single them out for a trade war.

    Yes, they signed all the pretty treaties, and then never adhered to them for a minute.

    Trump at least addressed a problem that the US ( and Europe, and Japan ) had slept through for a few decades. While China stole IP left and right, including Japan’s high speed train technology, etc.

  9. The Brexit talks have broken down. It looks like a no-deal is now nailed on, as someone hereabouts (I forget who) has been predicting for months:

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-55191432

  10. I got a good education from one of our hosts on what evil bastards the Serbs really were

    If you want an idea of how truly fucking depraved they were with the Bosniaks read Seasons in Hell, Understanding Bosnia’s War by Ed Vulliamy

  11. Peter,

    “The Brexit talks have broken down. It looks like a no-deal is now nailed on, as someone hereabouts (I forget who) has been predicting for months”

    You may be right, but this sort of last minute brinksmanship is an EU speciality and it would be an incredible act of self-harm by both parties to allow that to happen.

    Maybe they’ll walk Boris right up to the cliff edge and let him look over it for a while, then ask “how do you feel about that deal now?”. Then there’ll be some fudge / complete capitulation and both sides will claim it a great success.

  12. Radio 4 this evening says that the bookies have a deal at 85%. Maybe they’ll have a bit of a deal where there’s agreement and come back to the other stuff next year.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-55191432

    State aid subsidies, fishing and enforcement of new rules remain the key sticking points in negotiations.

    On that last point, I heard a French minister on Radio 4 say that a level playing field is non-negotiable. Brexiteers agree, but from the opposite direction. Boris knows he’s toast if he delivers something not seen as Brexit. He won’t be gone immediately, but Farage will be back and the Tories’ fate will be sealed at the next General Election.

  13. this sort of last minute brinksmanship is an EU speciality and it would be an incredible act of self-harm by both parties to allow that to happen.

    Frank

    Yes it will be, but that doesn’t mean it won’t happen. I’ve been following this as closely as I can for months and from what I can make out the gaps on fishing and convergence have not significantly narrowed for weeks. Fishing is irrelevant to the UK in economic terms (0.04% of GDP) but it is an important symbolic issue. Convergence on EU standards was mostly agreed but not how it would be enforced, again a symbolic issue.

    Both sides would prefer a deal but we have come to a crunch where neither is prepared to make the extra concessions needed to get one. Macron has been playing hardball as usual, convinced that Les Rosbeefs need to feel a hard rain, as someone once said.

  14. Do the French ( and Spanish? others? ) pay a fee for fishing in British waters now?

  15. No Phantom, but if it’s a no-deal all EU trawlers will all be banned from UK waters from 1 January and UK trawlers will be banned from all EU waters, including Republic of Ireland.

  16. read Seasons in Hell, Understanding Bosnia’s War by Ed Vulliamy

    Thanks for the tip Paul.