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THE EU, NOT BREXIT

By Pete Moore On January 12th, 2021

A Dutch TV network has filmed border officials confiscating ham sandwiches and other foods from drivers arriving in the Netherlands from the UK, under post-Brexit rules.

The officials were shown explaining import regulations imposed since the UK formalised its separation from the EU.

Under EU rules, travellers from outside the bloc are banned from bringing in meat and dairy products.

Some, like the BBC, are dressing this up as a Brexit thing. The truth this is how the parochial EU has always approached the rest of the world. A British trucker having his lunch confiscated is a microcosm of the protectionist barriers which have impoverished millions of farmers across the develooping world and hugely increased non-EU food prices for everyone in the EU.

Glad to be out of it.

10 Responses to “THE EU, NOT BREXIT”

  1. lol knew you guys wouldn’t stop complaining about the EU even post Brexit – you’re hilarious !

  2. Serious question

    Will British food prices be lower over time, now that you are out? Are they lower now?

  3. But when Irish fishing boats are turned away from Rock all, that’s perfectly fine? You’re hilarious, Pete! 😂

  4. Phantom –

    Prices haven’t changed yet but there’s no reason why they can’t be lower. The EU set tariffs on huge amounts of produce imported into the EU. In many cases it’s to protect EU producers. The UK can, and should, do away with them.

  5. Yep

    There is a universe of additional good produce and grain from the US Canada and South America for you to buy. Though you buy plenty right now.

    One trivia fact. You rarely see fresh European produce in America. Canned and frozen all day long, but not fresh. I don’t know why that is, since we get a lot of fresh from Chile, Argentina, etc.

  6. Phantom,

    “Will British food prices be lower over time, now that you are out? Are they lower now?”

    All prices for everything are higher now in real terms as sterling has devalued quite a lot, that started happening years ago tho (including before the vote even – so it’s been priced in for some time).

    Food prices will probably be higher again in the short term as there will be shortages of some stuff as the friction of non tariff barriers and form filling etc starts to hit. Tariffs don’t have much to do with it (and the UK doesn’t have to impose tariffs on itself anyway, except in so far as it has them with any other countries).

    In the long run there’s no reason that prices couldn’t be lower than before, but it depends what policies are followed.

  7. The EU set tariffs on huge amounts of produce imported into the EU. In many cases it’s to protect EU producers. The UK can, and should, do away with them.

    Of course some of those tariffs protected UK farmers as well. Just saying.

  8. Phantom

    Agree with the others but, there is a thing the EU introduced into the Agreement called, ‘The Level Playing Field’.This could be used to force us to raise prices. Who knows. But if we can import cheaper produce from elsewhere then we should.

  9. this EU/UK border thing is nothing new

    Just try bringing an orange into the US from Canada

  10. You’re also in trouble if there’s a half-eaten apple in your bag when you arrive in Australia.

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