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Iran….. Joe’s buddies….

By Patrick Van Roy On January 13th, 2021

 

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo confirmed Tuesday that al Qaeda’s number-two leader was killed last year in Iran, which Pompeo said has become the terror group’s primary base of operations in recent years.

“Al Qaeda has a new home base: the Islamic Republic of Iran,” Pompeo said during a small gathering at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C.

Al Qaeda leader Abu Muhammad al-Masri, who was on the FBI’s most wanted list, was eliminated in the streets of Tehran in August of last year, Pompeo said, confirming media reports at the time. This is the first time the U.S. government has publicly acknowledged al-Masri’s death.

The United States is now offering up to $7 million for information leading to the identification of al Qaeda leader Abd Al-Rahman al-Maghrebi, who Pompeo said is currently hiding in Iran. Al-Maghrebi is the head of al Qaeda’s media arm and oversees the group’s activities worldwide.

54 Responses to “Iran….. Joe’s buddies….”

  1. Pompeo also said that Cuba was a state sponsor of terrorism, which sounds like complete bullshit and pandering to Miami Cubans in advance of his president run in the post Trump 2024 election

    Al Queda and Iran have been serious enemies, not friends.

    Maybe we don’t need to listen to Pompeo anymore. It appears that he doesn’t know what he’s talking about.

  2. Cuba was added back to the State Sponsors of Terror list this week.

  3. Al Queda and Iran have been serious enemies, not friends.

    or maybe you’re wrong…..

    As I have been saying here for 20 years Iran is the head of the Snake they give support to EVERY terrorist group. Sunni, Shia, Venezuelan….

    Iran is truly the single greatest threat to the world. Bigger than China, bigger than Russia.

  4. Iran….Joe’s buddies

    Russia….Trump’s buddies.

    Still waiting for Trump to condemn Putin for the Navalny poisoning last August. Or for anything else in the last four years.

  5. Iran is truly the single greatest threat to the world. Bigger than China, bigger than Russia.

    LOL

    I must have missed it when Iran invaded indian territory in the Himalayas a few months ago, or manufactured islands in the South China Sea and sent troops to occupy them. Or started a trade war with Australia when it was called out for the pandemic.

    Or annexed and occupied Crimea and invaded Ukraine. Or used nerve agents and poison in England to eliminate political opponents. And the same in Berlin. Or launched a sophistacted months-long computer hack against the US government last year.

  6. What terrorism does Cuba sponsor

    Trump himself is a state sponsor of terrorism . Look at what he brought about this past Wednesday

  7. Trump himself is a state sponsor of terrorism . Look at what he brought about this past Wednesday

    But they were patriot protestors Phantom, and Trump had nothing to do with it. You need to get with the programme.

  8. Phantom, on January 13th, 2021 at 1:27 AM Said:
    What terrorism does Cuba sponsor

    you got me, I thought they were pretty much neutered. I read that earlier in the week that they were put back on the list. If you ask me Trump is setting FUs left and right for the Biden administration. He did a change to our Taiwan arrangement this week that the chicoms are having a bitch fit over.

    If he’s doing them for a reason it’s one thing, but I don’t see the reason for the change of status in cuba and I haven’t read the Taiwan info yet. They’ve been working with Taiwan the whole administration so that’s probably legit. But you can’t justify cuba it’s just to f with them.

  9. Peter no one has put more sanctions on Russia and russians than any other President. And Trump can be accredited for singlehandedly rebuilding NATO and getting the freeloading nations of europe to cough up for their own defense. NATO is at supply and resource levels than at anytime since it was formed….. and NATO exists to protect you free loaders from Russia.

    If you have a Problem with Russia you need to talk to Europe’s German overlords and their Russian Oil and Gas deals… there is your Russian threat and their willing accomplices.

    give me a minute I’ll get to Iran….

  10. Peter all the things you cite above are Chess. Calculated strategic moves by super powers. Pieces of longterm calculated moves to achieve the greater good for their corporations.

    Each of the major governments of the world have played this game even before the Romans, Greeks, and Egyptians.

    The Iranians are a cult that want to bring back god to earth and they believe to do so that they must first bath the world in the blood of the infidel and the Last Prophet will rise from the Well. The Nation is controlled by a religious cult that believe this to be reality whether you do or not isn’t important. The leaders of Iran do and they are purposefully working to implement the deaths of millions to achieve the return of their prophet.

    Religious fanatics racing to get nuclear weapons not as a deterrent but to bring back god…

    Yeah they are the greatest threat to EVERYONE…. doubt that at your own Peril.

  11. But they were patriot protestors Phantom, and Trump had nothing to do with it. You need to get with the programme.

    I think you misspelled pogrom

  12. The Iranians are a cult that want to bring back god to earth and they believe to do so that they must first bath the world in the blood of the infidel and the Last Prophet will rise from the Well. The Nation is controlled by a religious cult that believe this to be reality whether you do or not isn’t important. The leaders of Iran do and they are purposefully working to implement the deaths of millions to achieve the return of their prophet.

    Having so much in common with amurican evangelicals, you would suspect they should get along better

  13. China is by far the wickedest and most amoral regime in the world today. Here’s a quick refresher:

    “Arbitrary arrests, disappearances and imprisonment, torture, forced televised confessions, forced organ harvesting, slave labour and an Orwellian surveillance state form the state’s apparatus of repression. Many of these abuses have been laid out in a new report by the Conservative Party Human Rights Commission, focused on the crackdown on human rights in China in the last four years…

    Slave labour is widespread. According to the Australian Strategic Policy Institute (ASPI), Uyghurs have been forced to work in factories that supply at least 83 well-known global brands in the technology, clothing and automotive sectors. Between 2017 and 2019, over 80,000 Uyghurs were sent to work in factories across China. Mr Humphrey claims that prison labour also forms part of global supply chains, citing prison-made products supplied to companies. After media revelations some companies investigated and suspended their contacts with their Chinese suppliers, but many other global brands have yet to act.

    The regime’s development and deployment of mass surveillance technologies lie at the heart of its intensifying repression. As Dr Yang Jianli of the NGO Initiatives for China told the Commission, ‘China’s weapons of mass surveillance have already shown its ability to exert absolute control of populations… The system uses cutting-edge technologies to control almost every aspect of people’s lives’. China’s technology companies are at the very centre of this operation…”

    https://www.spectator.co.uk/article/china-s-human-rights-crackdown-is-getting-worse?utm_medium=email&utm_source=CampaignMonitor_Editorial&utm_campaign=BLND%20%2020210112%20%20House%20Ads%20%20SM+CID_e4b43c907d76fdb7a0de8c751e15d7e5

  14. Slave labour is widespread. According to the Australian Strategic Policy Institute (ASPI), Uyghurs have been forced to work in factories that supply at least 83 well-known global brands in the technology, clothing and automotive sectors. Between 2017 and 2019, over 80,000 Uyghurs were sent to work in factories across China.

    Arsenal player and ex-German international, Mezut Ozil, who is third-generation Turkish Muslim, criticised China for their treatment of the Uyghurs. He hasn’t played for Arsenal since. There had been a lot of – deserved, in my opinion – criticism of his commitment to the team on the pitch before this incident. This does, however, appear to have been a political decision by the club, fuelled by the fact that they receive substantial sponsorship from China, through television and shirt deals, amongst much more. In the week after he made the criticism, the scheduled televised Arsenal match was pulled from TV schedules in China. Arsenal football club released a statement, distancing themselves from the player’s criticism.
    As a fan of the team for more than 40 years, I find this to be a shameful decision by Arsenal. They could – and should – have stood by their player, and stated that the players’ opinions were their own and did not reflect upon the club as a whole. Instead, they had him dropped from the squad entirely. As their most highly paid player, earning £350,000 per week!, this means that, because of pressure from China, Arsenal allow a player to sit there and play absolutely no matches in a season, and it costs them £18,200 000 per year, in wages alone!

    From Wiki:

    In December 2019, Özil went on social media to publish a poem denouncing the treatment of Uyghurs in China.[269][270] The poem was written over a backdrop of the East Turkestan flag and in it, he also criticised Muslim countries for not speaking out about the Xinjiang re-education camps.[161][162][271] Arsenal later released a statement distancing itself from the comments.[272] China’s state broadcasters China Central Television and PP Sports responded two days later by removing the match between Arsenal and Manchester City from their schedules, while his likeness was removed from Chinese internet providers and version of eFootball PES 2020.[273] Some have suggested Özil’s eventual omission from the Arsenal squad was related to this criticism

  15. Interesting stuff, Seimi.

    Özil’s strong and personal support for Erdogan and his unquestioning support for Aazerbaijan in the recent conflict also contributed to his fall from grace in Germany.

  16. I read about the Erdogan stuff. Ozil said that he posed for a photo with him only because Erdogan was the head of state, and that they only talked about their shared passion for football. But Erdogan was later a witness at Ozil’s wedding, which suggests a lot more than mutual fondness for a sport.

    He has done a lot of charitable work as well. He donated his entire World Cup Winner’s bonus – £240,000 – to Brazilian children who needed life-saving operations, as a way of thanking the host country.

    More recently, when it was announced that, due to cutbacks caused by Covid, the club would be letting their mascot of twenty years go, Ozil said that he would pay the salary while he remained a player at the club.

  17. The NBA players and league have been very chatty about cops and Trump but have been very quiet about slave labor in China etc

    The owners were really unhappy when one team official made a comment in support of Hong Kong. I don’t think that you will hear more comments on HK

    China is a big market for the NBA

  18. China’s default response to criticism is to lash out immediately. The Ozil case is one example but there have been numerous others in the past twelve months, most notably when Australia called for a full independent inquiry into the Wuhan pandemic outbreak. China reacted with diplomatic fury and within weeks it had placed enormous tariffs on all Australian goods it imports and a total embargo on Australian coal.

  19. And yes, the EU very recently signed a new trade deal with China

  20. I think when push comes to shove sport is a business. And if your off the field activities are going to be a distraction to your team or cost your team money then you better be worth the distraction and cost.

    When Colin Kaepernick, who isn’t very good, took up the cause of protesting against police brutality it cost him his place in the NFL. But when Patrick Mahomes took up the same cause the NFL budged on the issue. Because Mahomes was worth it and Kaepernick wasn’t.

    So I think that is part of the issue with Mesut Özil. If 2016 Özil makes those comments about the situation in East Turkestan, and if 2016 Özil gets chummy with fascist leaders, then he doesn’t get dropped. He doesn’t get left out. Because the level of play he provided would be worth the distraction he causes. But 2020 Özil? Not so much.

    A cynical part of me would suggest that Mesut Özil is only drawing attention to the Uyghur genocide because the Uyghurs are Turkic. And if they weren’t Turkic the Özil wouldn’t be drawing attention to them. Whether it is support of the Turkic Uyghurs, support for the Turkic Azerbaijan in the Nagorno-Karabakh war, or his support for the Turkic fascist Erdoğan, you can pretty much count on Mesut Özil taking the Turkic side in a conflict.

    “As a fan of the team for more than 40 years”

    And there I thought you and I were on the same page on most things Seimi.

  21. Seamus

    I’m not making any comment on the validity of Ozil’s concern for the Uyghur, as I’m sure you know, but rather on China’s response and Arsenal’s apparent capitulation to their wishes.

    I agree about the 2016 Ozil vs the 2020 Ozil.

    “As a fan of the team for more than 40 years”

    And there I thought you and I were on the same page on most things Seimi.

    I’m almost afraid to ask…who?

  22. Has a comment of mine got stuck in a filter somewhere? I posted just before my 1.38 above, regarding an off-topic news item, but it hasn’t appeared.

  23. “I’m almost afraid to ask…who?”

    The team now back exactly where they belong – Man Utd.

  24. “I’m not making any comment on the validity of Ozil’s concern for the Uyghur, as I’m sure you know, but rather on China’s response and Arsenal’s apparent capitulation to their wishes.”

    Absolutely. But my point is Arsenal are a business, with shareholders. They are in service of those shareholders and need to protect their interest. That is their first role. And if Özil’s value as a player is worth less than their business in China then, from a purely business point of view (forget morality – it doesn’t exist at this level), Arsenal took the correct decision.

  25. A cynical part of me would suggest that Mesut Özil is only drawing attention to the Uyghur genocide because the Uyghurs are Turkic.

    Despite that, Erdogan has not said a single word about it, because he’s bought and paid for by China. In fact not a single islamist regime has spoken out for the same reason.

  26. “Despite that Erdogan has not said a single word about it, because he’s bought and paid for by China. In fact not a single islamist regime has spoken out for the same reason.”

    Indeed. Because unlike most western populists (Trump, Brexiteers etc…) China understand what foreign aid is actually for.

    I’d also suggest that, like most strongmen, Erdoğan only cares about Erdoğan.

  27. “I’m almost afraid to ask…who?”

    The team now back exactly where they belong – Man Utd.

    Ah, the ‘no-brainer’ team.

    Me: I like football. I think I’ll support a team.

    My Brain: Well, there are plenty of excellent teams to choose from! Arsenal have never been relegated, and they hold the record for most FA Cups won; Liverpool have a fantastic European pedigree; Everton have very strong links with the working class Irish in Liverpool; Aston Villa…

    Me: Man Utd won much things, many years ago. Me support them!

    🙂

    My Brain: See ye!

  28. 🙂

    To be honest I think the major reason I started supporting Man Utd is because, when I was a kid, they were on TV more than anyone else.

  29. Absolutely. But my point is Arsenal are a business, with shareholders. They are in service of those shareholders and need to protect their interest. That is their first role. And if Özil’s value as a player is worth less than their business in China then, from a purely business point of view (forget morality – it doesn’t exist at this level), Arsenal took the correct decision.

    I understand that, and although Arsenal may have made the ‘correct’ decision financially, as a fan, I’m disappointed that they didn’t make the ‘right’ decision at all.

  30. More embarassment for Huawei. Just a wild guess – this patent will not be altered:

    “A Huawei patent has been brought to light for a system that identifies people who appear to be of Uighur origin among images of pedestrians. The filing is one of several of its kind involving leading Chinese technology companies, discovered by a US research company and shared with BBC News. Huawei had previously said none of its technologies was designed to identify ethnic groups. It now plans to alter the patent.”

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-55634388?utm_campaign=newsletter_daily&utm_source=newsletter&utm_brand=wi&utm_mailing=WI_NEWS_Daily_13012021&utm_medium=email&utm_term=wi_news_wired_daily

  31. “Al Qaeda has a new home base: the Islamic Republic of Iran,”

    I always thought Al-Qaeda and Iran were enemies, not friends.

  32. “I always thought Al-Qaeda and Iran were enemies, not friends.”

    So does everyone, except for Troll and his conspiracy theory friends.

    “I understand that, and although Arsenal may have made the ‘correct’ decision financially, as a fan, I’m disappointed that they didn’t make the ‘right’ decision at all.”

    Indeed.

  33. To be honest I think the major reason I started supporting Man Utd is because, when I was a kid, they were on TV more than anyone else.

    No more stupid a reason than, ‘red is my favourite colour,’ which was my son’s reason for supporting Liverpool when he was younger.

    People have the stupidest reasons for supporting teams: the reason(s) I started supporting Arsenal were partly because everyone else seemed to support Utd, and I wanted to be different, and partly because they had so many Irish players in the team at the time: Jennings, Rice, O’Leary etc.

  34. Iran opposed the attacks of 9/11 loudly right as it happened, never changed on that, and they have been mortal enemies of Al Queda at all times.

    This doesn’t make Iran’s government good, but you guys just have to stop making stuff up at some point in your life.

    You are embarrassing Allan and Alex Jones at this point.

  35. “No more stupid a reason than, ‘red is my favourite colour,’ which was my son’s reason for supporting Liverpool when he was younger.”

    Did you not point out to him that Arsenal also play in red?

    “People have the stupidest reasons for supporting teams: the reason(s) I started supporting Arsenal were partly because everyone else seemed to support Utd, and I wanted to be different, and partly because they had so many Irish players in the team at the time: Jennings, Rice, O’Leary etc.”

    I think that is the norm in Ireland. About 40% support United, about 40% support Liverpool, about 15% support Arsenal (largely due to the fact that the Arsenal side in the late 70s was pretty much a United Ireland XI), and about 5% supporting Chelsea, City etc…

  36. This was the news item I linked to earlier, which seems to be stuck in a filter or something.

    Indiana has executed the USA’s first female prisoner in 67 years.

    Worthy of a post in itself?

    Her crime was horrific, but there is strong evidence to suggest that she was mentally ill and a victim of childhood abuse.

  37. Did you not point out to him that Arsenal also play in red?

    Of course. And his answer was, “Yeah, but Liverpool wear ALL red!”

    You can’t argue with that logic!

  38. Fair enough. As you say there is no logical reason for supporting team A or team B.

  39. Very many here support teams for various reasons also.

    Liking the uniform, liking one player on the team, liking the team because they were good when you were 10 years old.

    There are Pittsburgh Steelers fans all over the US because they were a champion team in the 1970s

    There are Pittsburgh Pirates fans in the Latin community all over the US because the great Roberto Clemente, one of the first big Latin stars, a proud guy who died when flying to give aid to earthquake stricken Nicaragua, played for them. You will often see Spanish speaking guys with the hat with the big P on it everywhere you go. Because of Roberto Clemente.

    https://www.amazon.com/Remember-Roberto-Clemente-Teammates-Pittsbugh/dp/0916114147

  40. When I started watching American sports I pretty much started supporting the Boston teams (due to the links between Ireland and Boston). However, as I had spent the 90s supporting Man Utd I had been regularly accused of being a ‘glory hunter’ by the [checks notes] jealous fans of other teams. At that time the Celtics hadn’t won a championship since before I was born. The Bruins hadn’t won a Stanley Cup for about a decade more than that. And the Red Sox hadn’t won a championship since before my grandfather was born. But the Patriots had just won the Superbowl. And so, after the repeated accusation of being a ‘glory hunter’, I couldn’t just start supporting a team that had won the Superbowl the year before. So I started looking for another team and found the Colts. I liked the players mostly. Good line, good Quarterback, good recievers. Lots of passing.

  41. I am a ” fan ” of the departed Montreal Expos, who for a good while was a successful, interesting team in one of North America’s interesting cities, one with deep baseball roots ( Jackie Robinson played for the Montreal Royals AAA team, and spoke of how he was treated with respect there, unlike what he went through in the US at that time )

    And I am a supporter of Montreal’s effort to have a team once more.

  42. Religious fanatics racing to get nuclear weapons not as a deterrent but to bring back god…

    Like the extreme evangelicals in the US.

  43. There are Pittsburgh Steelers fans all over the US because they were a champion team in the 1970s

    I’m a Steelers fan because of this! After they won the Superbowl for the first time, in 1974, they went on a winning streak, becoming the only team to win it 4 times in 6 years. At some point during this, they went on a world tour, even though most of the western world hadn’t a clue who they were. Some of the team came to Belfast, and wanted to see the Irish-speaking school, which was us. How they had heard about us, I don’t know, but all I remember is a group of black and white giants coming into our classroom. They gave us all T-shirts, showing an oil derrick, an American football and the words Pittsburgh Superchamps on them. We treasured those shirts, even though they were massive and didn’t fit any of us! 🙂

    I just realised – this means that I met members of one of the greatest NFL teams in the sport’s history! That’s kinda cool! 🙂

  44. I think the biggest barrier to Montreal getting a MLB team is the cost of expansion. To put things into consideration the Seattle Kraken NHL team paid an expansion fee of $650 million. Most likely a MLB expansion fee would be closer to $1 billion. And also most likely MLB would be adding two teams at once (take the league up to 32 – AL 16 teams, NL 16 teams – likely 4 conferences with 4 teams in each league). So a Montreal MLB would need to find an ownership group willing to spend $1 billion before earning a ¢. And given that the Expos folded because of a lack of financial market it is hard to see that happening.

    The only other option would be relocating a current franchise (maybe the Tampa Bay Rays).

  45. However, as I had spent the 90s supporting Man Utd I had been regularly accused of being a ‘glory hunter’ by the [checks notes] jealous fans of other teams.

    Here, let me fix that for you.

    However, as I had spent the 90s supporting Man Utd I had been regularly correctly accused of being a ‘glory hunter’ by the [checks notes] jealous intelligent fans of other teams.

    You’re welcome 😉

  46. Montreal was playing in the god awful domed Olympic Stadium, one of many issues that crushed fan interest there.

    For a number of years, they drew over 2 million fans per year, at a time when that was a big deal. They were enormously successful. For years, they were the national team of Canada, before the Blue Jays came to be.

    I think that Montreal gets another team in the not so distant future.

    But yes the economics is tricky. Loads of money in Quebec and Canada, but the franchise would be pricey and they’d be competing with NYC and Chicago, etc.

    Tampa Bay rays may move, for some reason major league ball has never done great in Florida. Their stadium is even worse than Olympic Stadium

  47. Go Chelsea…….

    If I were following sports which I no longer do…. I support only 2 Teams Eagles and the Flyers.

  48. Every night at a Flyers game used to be a Pier Six Brawl, on the ice and in the stands.

  49. best sports event ever to attend was a Flyers Game…. during the days of the LCB Line we had season tickets right next to the Penalty box.

  50. That was an interesting chapter in the history of the NHL

    I bet visitors totally hated playing in that place

  51. Broad Street Bullies

  52. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IUbn5ss8j9c

    Sorta like this

  53. One of the mistakes that is often made in the West when thinking about the Middle East is to see everything through a sectarian lens. This is reductive and leads to faulty judgements.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2020/11/13/world/middleeast/al-masri-abdullah-qaeda-dead.html

    This is a very interesting piece in the NYT about a recent assassination in Tehran that nobody wanted to talk about. It suited Al Qaeda operatives to flee to Iran after 9/11 because it was always going to be harder for the US or Israel to snare them there; evidently no impossible, but more difficult.

    The first foreign leader to visit the Islamic Republic in 79 was Arafat (a Sunni Muslim leader of a majority Sunni Muslim people). He received a hero’s welcome. Iran has also supported the Syrian Alawite regime, as well as Hamas and the Egyptian Muslim Brotherhood.

    The conclusion? The salience of sectarianism is vastly exaggerated in the region. Nationalism is in many ways a much more potent force, and the Islamic Republic plays its geopolitical chess as calmly and rationally as anyone.

  54. Slapshot…..

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