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COPPER KILLS THE CHINA VIRUS

By Pete Moore On February 20th, 2021

It’s an age of discovery. Copper’s antimicrobial properties have been known for a long time. You can add SARS-CoV-2 to the list of critters it kills.

Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is announcing that certain copper alloys provide long-term effectiveness against viruses, including SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. As a result of EPA’s approval, products containing these copper alloys can now be sold and distributed with claims that they kill certain viruses that come into contact with them […]

Antimicrobial copper alloys can be manufactured into a wide range of surfaces, including doorknobs and handrails.

I love copper and thoroughly approve of copper alloy doorknobs and handrails. The old ways and materials are best.

6 Responses to “COPPER KILLS THE CHINA VIRUS”

  1. Don’t eat too much copper Pete, it’s toxic in certain quantities.

    //The old ways and materials are best.//

    And yet, we’re living far longer than we did in the old days. And in much better health.

  2. Dave –

    We are, thanks to capitalism and markets. They have enabled miracles in food production, sanitation and medicine. And we could live even healthier lives with small changes, such as using wooden chopping boards and cooking utensils. Woods are also antimicrobial. We have too many chemicals and toxins in our homes and the environment. We can easily ditch many, leading to better health and a more beautiful, tactile and sustainable world.

  3. // We are, thanks to capitalism and markets. //

    Maybe. But who’s to say we wouldn’t have the same benefits under some other economic system. Is capitalism sustainable in the long run?

    // We have too many chemicals and toxins in our homes and the environment. //

    I don’t understand your chemicals comment. Everything is chemicals Pete.
    I agree with you about toxins though. The fossil fuel industry puts enormous amounts of toxins into our environment, killing hundreds of thousands every year.

  4. We have too many chemicals and toxins in our homes and the environment.

    The biggest problem with chemicals is their vast over-use in agriculture. The most recent crisis is the use of neonicotinoids which are known to have seriously reduced the populations of bees and other pollinating insects. This chemical was banned by the EU two years ago, and guess what? The UK has reinstated it within days of Brexit:

    “A pesticide believed to kill bees has been authorised for use in England despite an EU-wide ban on its use outdoors two years ago and an explicit government pledge to keep the restrictions. Following lobbying from the National Farmers’ Union (NFU) and British Sugar, a product containing the neonicotinoid thiamethoxam was sanctioned for emergency use on sugar beet seeds this year because of the threat posed by a virus.

    Conservationists have described the decision as regressive and called for safeguards to prevent the pollution of rivers with rainwater containing the chemical at a time when British insects are in serious decline.”

    https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2021/jan/09/pesticide-believed-kill-bees-authorised-use-england-eu-farmers

  5. “Is capitalism sustainable in the long run?”

    You don’t want to try any alternative. Capitalism (allied with markets; they are two different things) has been the genuine miracle in humanity’s existence. Poverty is the natural state of humanity. The sole and underlying reason why we are wealthy is capitalism and markets.

    Look at this simple line showing global GDP over the last 2000 years:

    https://ourworldindata.org/grapher/exports/world-gdp-over-the-last-two-millennia.svg

    Wow, what happened? It’s a stunning line. British (classical) liberalism happened in the 18th and 19th centuries. Liberalism meant the liberty to own property and goods (capitalism) and to trade freely (markets). We exported it around the world, via an empire which is the best thing that has has ever happened to that world – fact.

    Without capitalism and markets we would still be living lives that are short and brutal. Most of us would be breaking our back in fields. With them we have created the wealth and the time to make every advance we know.

  6. Without capitalism and markets we would still be living lives that are short and brutal. Most of us would be breaking our back in fields. With them we have created the wealth and the time to make every advance we know.

    Maybe Pete, but the scientific revolution was at least as important. Those rapidly rising living standards from around 1800 were made possible by industrial inventions in the previous 100 years(Newcomen’s pump, James Watt’s steam engine, the spinning jenny etc) which facilitated the rise of steam power and mass production. And of course the agrarian revolution which transformed agricultural production after 1700.

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