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GOT A PROBLEM? HERE’S THE ANSWER….

By ATWadmin On December 1st, 2006

Worried about traffic congestion?   RAISE TAXES.

Worried about Global Warming? RAISE TAXES.

Worried about meeting European water standards? RAISE TAXES

Worried about a failing National Health Service? RAISE TAXES.

When it comes to Big Government,  EVERY problem has the same solution. RAISE TAXES. That’s why politicians can be so very dangerous, and why small limited Government is so necessary.

If we continue to casually accept the pathetic excuses for punitive taxation offered up by the political class, then they will figure that they can steal our money with impunity. Better still, they will realise we have become a nation of SEDATED serfs, happily handing over our hard-earned cash in exchange for their empty promises, bread and reality-TV circuses.

17 Responses to “GOT A PROBLEM? HERE’S THE ANSWER….”

  1. And the alternative solutions from the right:

    Traffic congestion: just keep building roads till the country is covered in tarmac.

    Global warming: deny it’s happening, or if that doesn’t work, fall back to trench 2, which is that man is not in any way to blame.

    Water standards: Abolish these, they’ve just been invented by power-crazy Euro beaurocrats. If polluted water was good enough for our ancestors…

    NHS: Abolish this and import the US model, which has 20% of the population dependent on minimal provision but still manages to consume a much higher percentage of gdp than the socialist British model.

  2. ..and the reasoning from the right..

    Where are the new roads? Where is all that extra fuel duty going?

    If we have global warming over the past few decades on Mars and Jupiter, assuming we don’t believe in little green men, why on EARTH should we believe anthropogenic emissions are to blame? The Environmentalists have turned their beliefs into a religion, and more taxation is their only mantra.

    Why should water not be metered, pay as you go? No exceptions. Why does the EU have a right to tell US what to do?

    Why do UK patients fly over to the States to avail themselves of the higher standards there? Why was Monica, a regular ATW reader, SHOCKED to discover we still have wards? Lucky I didnt mention patients lying on trolleys, dead in the corridors….

    Taxes, taxes, and more taxes…the refrain goes on…

  3. David,

    You have me… I want to be a fully signed up member of the party…. you have hit the nail with the post above.

    Im sick to the teeth of ‘Raising Taxes’ being pushed as the solution to all of the worlds problems.

    Environment taxes are my pet hate. Im already spending a fortune on gas and electrical bills. Both of these are due to go up in the range of 20% in January. And yet theres talk imposing more environmental taxes on these. Im not sure if the WEEE directive has been implemented in NI yet, it will be soon im sure, but this directive says that when I buy something ive to pay a little towards its future disposal. So if I buy a tv, ive to put and extra 50euro towards its future disposal, even though, heck, it might last me till im 90, and i might sell it on then, it doesnt matter, I still have to pay up front.

    Whats the point in putting an environmental tax on paddy in belfast or dublin, if the population’s of india and china continue to increase their use of carbon materials at the rate they are. The Irish/UK contribution to global warming is minimal compared to India and China.

    The same applies to the public service. They are costing us an absolute fortune. I dont agree that as a orivate sector worker, where my job can be terminated with a months notice, where my pension is my problem, where ive 20days holidays. take it or leave it, where I pay my own health insurance, that ive got to subsides public sector workers who get state pensions relative to their wages, who get paid overtime, get 25 and more days holidays a year, excluding ‘sick’ days which are also seen as holidays, and get guaranteed wage increases and all of this with little or no accountability. Its crazy

  4. Kloot,

    Exactly right. The Public Sector – the Statist sector – grows remorselessly and costs astronomically, yet it does not create any wealth. The wealth-creating sector – the Non State sector – has to pay for the growth of the State sector. Something has to give – will we become serfs, working for State workers pensions and holidays???

  5. David

    Answers as follows:

    Plenty of roads have been built / upgraded in the last 10 years. In NI we’ve had the M3 and Toome by-pass as well as improvemnets to the road to Dublin (no pun intended!) Traffic growth continues remorselessly and the only solution long term is road pricing.

    There is a mass of evidence for anthropogenic global warming on earth, but of course its not conclusive yet. The issue is whether to act early on a hypothesis which may turn out to be wrong, despite the evidence so far.

    I agree water should be metred, but this is a different issue from water quality. The water directive is a necessary measure for public health. Ask anyone who lives in North Down about the raw sewage being dumped into the Irish Sea.

    I repeat the US system is wasteful of resources and fails 20% of the US population. That’s not the same as saying that the NHS is perfect.

  6. Peter,

    I have family that live in Donaghadee. They couldn’t give a toss about the raw sewage. (Not saying I agree with them!)

    The NHS fails around 100% of the people that are unlucky enough to use it. Give me the US system anyday. Statist healthcare is infantilising in effect.

    Why are other Planets experiencing global warming over the past few decades? Might it be that the Sun is the key driver and even environmentalists haven’t figured out a way to tax that. Yet.

    Build new roads, yes. Find a way to tax for use of them, fine. But privatise it, remove the dead hand of Government, reduce car taxation and fuel duty, and then I will be happy.

  7. Why do anything about road congestion? The congestion itself will act as a traffic regulator. Build bigger, wider roads, and the traffic will increase to occupy the extra space.

    When people get sufficiently tired of sitting in traffic, they will find an alternative means of travel, and you can be sure that it will be far more effective, and less costly than anything the government can come up with. – But then, of course, that is not the point of the exercise, is it?

    The only, and single result of ‘road pricing’, will be yet further separation between the ‘haves’, and the ‘have-nots’. You can rest assured that the likes of ‘Two Jags’, will still have their ride to work, and their spouses will have their car for shopping, etc..

    There are answers to the problem that do not involve extra cash payments to the government, but as I wrote earlier, that is not the point of the excercise…

  8. >>I have family that live in Donaghadee. <<

    Spent a year on and off visiting Donaghadee and that area of the country. An absolutely beautiful part of the Ireland. Very friendly people with no hassle at all with my southern accent. Stayed on one of the local estates surrounded by Union Jacks, it was different from what id be used to down south, but still all in all I got used to it. I read somewhere that the local orange hall was damaged by arson there recently.

  9. Kloot.

    I think many of the Southern accents are charming and much less harsh than some of our local accents up here.

  10. David

    I’m quite happy for water to be privatised so long as the company is sensibly regulated as to investment performance, charges and quality. But the record of privatised water companies in GB is not encouraging – huge wastage through leakage in London for example.

    The NHS has improved significantly in recent years thanks to spending on more doctors and nurses. My mother died recently in hospital and we couldn’t fault the level of care she received from the NHS.

    Road pricing charges will always have to be determined by government or local authorities. That doesn’t mean it has to be operated by government. The London congestion charge is contracted out to Capita.

    As to global warming, I think man is causing it and you don’t. I’ve read quite a bit and am convinced, but I accept it’s not conclusive yet.

    Ernest

    Congestion has a huge economic cost. People sitting in traffic jams aren’t producing anything except pollution. But I take your point about haves and have-nots. Road pricing when it comes will tend to price the poor off the roads to the benefit of the rich who won’t care about the charges.

  11. david, if you continually demand that westminster rule us under the current status quo, you havent got a leg to stand on with these issues.

  12. Daytripper,

    You entirely misrepresent me. I consistently argue for small government, for minimum political interference. I favour an NI "Grand Committee" @ Westminster that takes decisions o our behalf. That is both democratic AND responsible.

  13. Peter,

    Interesting to read your thoughts on the impact of water privatisation "on the mainland." To what do you attribute the poor performance?

    Sorry to hear about your Mother.

  14. Peter,

    My point was that people would tolerate wasting time in traffic congestion only to a certain point, after that they will find their own solution to the problem, either by traveling by different means, or routes. Widen the roads now, and in five years time we will have the same problem.

    Will they only be happy when we all live on a motorway, railway line, or worse, by an airport?

    Yet ‘they’ still encourage open borders, telling us we need the extra labour, to maintain the economy…that, like so much else ‘they’ would have us believe, is total rubbish, as is the idea that congestion ‘has a huge economic cost’- while having some cost, it doesn’t have a ‘huge’ cost until some bureaucrat decides to spend millions on some ill thought out scheme. Yet another example of statistics being exaggerated to suit the agenda.

    I know the politicians ambition is ‘to widen the tax base’, but isn’t this all getting a bit out of hand?

    Thirty, or so years ago we had Dr. Beeching closing and removing large parts of the rail network, on the excuse that they were ‘surplus to requirements’, and were being maintained ‘at a huge, and pointless cost,as railways were no longer needed’, now the opposite holds true.

    Do your much vaunted, and highly paid ‘experts’ ever get anything right?

  15. David

    I think Offwat has been far too easy on companies like Thames Water in terms of their investment performance. Instead of setting strict leakage reduction targets, Offwat has allowed them to over-charge their customers and make excessive profits paid out as dividends to their shareholders.

    Ernest

    You are right that new roads capacity simply creates more road demand. The alternative routes are already at capacity – every urban area has its "rat-runs" at rush hour.

    They’re not "my" experts, but you don’t need to be a genius to work out that congestion must be costing millions each day in terms of lost productivity. So some solution has to be found and road pricing is the only possibility that I can see.

  16. Peter,

    Yes congestion does cost – but mainly to the commuter – and as I wrote, when it hurts them, mentally, physically, or financially, they will soon find an alternative…till then road pricing is just another excuse to tax…

    An alternative would be the ‘alternate day car usage’ system, as is used in Athens. That would immediately halve the congestion, and at no cost to the public…but that is not the name of the game, is it?

  17. Ernest

    It would only work if it was widely obeyed and unfortunately I think in our country there are enough people ignoring the law as it stands anyway, I do agree with your point though about how building more roads would only bring more traffic onto them. Everyone always wants everyone else of the roads and not themselves.