56 1 min 9 yrs

And SOME people think the GAA is a bit close to the IRA appreciation society;

The mother of an 11-year-old boy is angry that children at a Gaelic Athletic Club football blitz at the weekend were given medals bearing the picture of a dead IRA man. The medals given to the Under-12 boys at Galbally Pearses Club in Tyrone featured Martin McCaughey. He and IRA man Dessie Grew were shot dead by the SAS in October 1990. “It was outrageous. My son was asking what the hero did,” said the mother who did not want to be named. “We had no warning that the medals would be dedicated to a dead IRA man.”

I am sure the GAA authorities will be issuing an apology and condemning Galbally Pearses Club. Any moment now….

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56 thoughts on “TIME FOR GAA TO APOLOGISE?

  1. The GAA is not in charge of the clubs. They make their own decisions. It is in fact the clubs acting collectively that control the GAA. So the GAA has not authority to condemn the club or censure it in any way. Nor is it the business of the GAA to issue apologies for the policies of a club. It has no function or authority in that regard.

    The members own the clubs and the clubs own the GAA. Not the other way around.

  2. Certainly the national organization has some ability to sanction a club. Lets say for instance a club didn’t use amateur players, allowed table tennis to be played on the field, or imported palyers from Hogn Kong wouldn’t the GAA be heard from?

    I am not sure that the national organization has to apologize for a bad idea by the local affiliate, but certainly they can issue some sort of disassociation from such a practice? I’ve never heard of a shy GAA official.

  3. Croke Park can only sanction a club if it has broken one of the rules of the GAA nad I can’t think of a rule that this would break.

  4. Well sanction options may not be on the table, but surely they can give an opinion.

  5. Not really. If someone makes a complaint it will be investigated and if there is a case to answer then that case will be held. Croke Park has no business butting into the individual running of local clubs if those clubs haven’t broken the GAA’s rules.

  6. The GAA has a non-sectarian clause in its regs as well as others which this child abuse no doubt transgresses.

    Not that that matters to the likes of the GAA.

  7. Mahons

    Lets say for instance a club didn’t use amateur players, allowed table tennis to be played on the field, or imported palyers from Hogn Kong wouldn’t the GAA be heard from?

    Anything to do with the rules as laid down is their business. But hundreds of clubs up and down the country are named in honour of Irish freedom fighters. The Sam Maguire Cup presented to the all-Ireland champions is named after a protestant IRA man. Do we really want the GAA to be getting into the argument about which phases of the national struggle are legitimate and which are not? How can a sporting organisation decide that when everybody you ask will have a different answer?

    The only sane approach is to let the clubs make their own decisions. If parents or other members have an objection every club has a democratic structure through which any issue can be raised. That’s assuming there is a real parent behind the quotes which I doubt.

  8. Henry94 –

    “The only sane approach is to let the clubs make their own decisions.”

    But the clubs are tied by the GAA, which, in NI, is a subversive cultural organisation:

    1.2 Basic Aim

    The Association is a National Organisation which has as
    its basic aim the strengthening of the National Identity
    in a 32 County Ireland through the preservation and
    promotion of Gaelic Games and pastimes.

    You can imagine the reaction if the FA adopted as its primary goal the strengthening of English National Identity.

  9. No surprise to anyone outside the bitter and intolerant gaa/republican community who after all even vote into government mass murdering cowardly scum.
    As usual we will hear platitudes and excuses from the usual suspects about it being sport and non political, but as Pete has exposed it is political and an affront to a society which is apparently ‘moving on.’

    Nothing new then, catholics voting for terrorists and supporting the brainwashing of their children and gratification of the same cowardly mass murderers we have to tolerate in case of offending the poor catholics.

  10. Pete,

    Your comparison with the FA is feeble. Last time I looked, England was reasonably independent and autonomous.

    I may not agree with their aspirations but many nationalists in NI desire a united Ireland, seeing as they do the present situation as a British occupation of their country.

    In this light, the GAA is hardly “a subversive cultural organisation”. If it were, then your praise for the Polish patriots Karski and Walesa the other day speaks of double standards:

    Karski and Walesa are two extraordinarily brave patriots… Freedom and liberty, and awards in their defence, were not founded in the US, and they will long outlive the US.

  11. Pete,

    The GAA was part of the national movement along with the language revival movement and the movement for political independence. The English FA arose in a country where freedom was taken for granted. No foreign soldiers ever opened fire on a crowd of spectators at Wembley Stadium like British soldiers did at Croke Park.

    If the GAA is subversive then Irish nationalism is subversive in all its manifestations be they peaceful or not.

  12. Logical Unionist

    I hope it makes you feel better to vent your sectarian spleen but it makes no contribution to understanding. How can you talk about moving on while trotting out the most bizarre anti-Catholic cliches. Who do you think you could convince with such a diatribe?

  13. Henry…tut, tut, I expected better.

    Of course Irish nationalism is subversive!

    As they resorted to terrorism to usurp democracy and ended up, er, um, at Stormont under the Union Flag and subservient to Westminster and the Queen.

    It must be very satisfying.

    Of course, no British Soldiers ever planted bombs indiscrimately and deliberately planned to kill children, women and innocent bystanders, but that of course is bad form bringing up the past when it doesn’t suit; isn’t it?

    lol

  14. Henry 94 – Well Sam Maguire’s IRA involvement was duing the time of the actual and historic struggle for Irish Independence, as opposed to the self-styled freedom fighters of the Troubles. I draw a line between the two, though some may not. I understand your point about debating phases, but wouldn’t such a debate be unnecessary if medals were actually named after players of the sport rather than mere IRA members. Clearly the intention in this instance was sectarian.

    Is it your opinion that the GAA would not be within its rights to even express displeasure if some club for instance awarded medals named after an individual linked to the Omagh bombing?

  15. Henry,

    the truth hurts, eh?

    A majority of catholics are in a church ridden (pardon the pun), with paedos, plus a majority of catholics vote for mass murderers.

    Fact.

    I do not need to ‘convince’ anyone, this is fact, not opinion.

  16. Mahons,

    Martin McCaughey played the sport for the club in question. He was a star player at youth levels for Galbally Pearses.

  17. Richard Clinton –

    From the majority view, the GAA is clearly a subversive organisation. That’s the stated basic aim of the GAA.

    Henry94 –

    I’m aware of those historical connections between the GAA and republicanism. Maybe it’s best if everyone stays honest about them – and that stated aim of the GAA – instead of laying on the usual old blarney about it being just a sporting organisation.

  18. Mahons,

    what is different about mass murder in Omagh, or mass murder in Belfast, or Teebane, La Mon and elsewhere?

    The sickening thing is, the perps are sitting in government, voted in by the catholic community.

    How can we ‘move on’ with these criminals still being immorally rewarded?

  19. Seamus,

    he wasn’t that good at retrieving weapons though.

    The fires are still burning I hope…

  20. Seamus – It is your opinion that they were selected for the honor for their playing ability? I’m sorry, but my mother drowned the dumb children.

    Logical Unionist- You are not particularly helpful. Your characterizations tend to provide the cover needed for those who support the modern IRA, they can point to your intolerance to justify their own. History is fianlly moving you and them to the sidelines.

  21. Mahons,

    I have intolerance for mass murderers.

    Is that wrong?

    I am not on the sidelines, although I am pushing to get the terrorists who occupy central stage to not just the sidelines, but where they belong; in jail.

    How dare you pontificate to a former soldier about intolerance when I have been there, done it and saved lives of all citizens in NI, much to the chagrin of scum that the majority of catholics vote for.

    When they can desist from supporting the ira at the ballot box, then we have a chance to finally move on.

  22. No he wasn’t selected for that but you said that they should name them after people who played the sport and they did. The local club took a local person who played the sport, who is seen by the local people as having died for his country, who is respected by many of the local people, and put his face on a medal.

  23. Seamus,

    he was actively engaged in trying to murder people.

    Your community still supports these type of people.

    Shameful.

  24. Logical – Apparently wisdom does not always come with age.

    Seamus – I’ve no idea what a poll of community would reveal about where the two gentleman at question stand on the hierarchy of heroes chart. But certainly the community could do better for all concerned by less provocative choices.

  25. I wouldn’t say it is provocative. If they did it on a grand stage, in an event attended by everyone then you may have a point. But this was a small competition, in a small club, in a community that Martin McCaughey came from. It wasn’t provocative just because some people go out of their way to be offended by these things.

  26. Mahons, no; usually with direct experience and not from the very sidelines you mentioned…

  27. People go out of their way to be offended by a murdering terrorist.

    There you have it!

    Irish catholic/nationalist/republican ethos in a nutshell.

    Shameful.

  28. Pete,

    “From the majority view, the GAA is clearly a subversive organisation. That’s the stated basic aim of the GAA.”

    From the majority (Politburo) view, Solidarity was clearly a subversive organization.

  29. The GAA has never been involved witha confrontation with the British forces in the north. Unlike the Orange Order for example at the Garvaghy Road. So if we are defining subversive as believing in a united Ireland then I’m a subversive too.

    LU
    How dare you pontificate to a former soldier about intolerance when I have been there, done it and saved lives of all citizens in NI, much to the chagrin of scum that the majority of catholics vote for.

    And that’s what we are subversive against. Anti-Catholic nutjobs sent by the British government.

    Mahons

    Is it your opinion that the GAA would not be within its rights to even express displeasure if some club for instance awarded medals named after an individual linked to the Omagh bombing?

    The GAA at national level would not. But it is impossible that any club would do that unless by some fluke it was completely unrepresentative of the nationalist community. We have seen how anti-Agreement republicans do at the ballot box and it is clear that their support among the population is minuscule.

    For many of us the Agreement, which has more support than either the union or a united Ireland marks the point after which violence became not only ineffective but unacceptable.

  30. Galbally Pearses are named in honour of Padraig Pearse the leader of the 1916 rising. Is that any different?

  31. GAA = Shinners at play.

    I’m sure that the numerous SDLP GAA enthusiasts, (Joe Byrne, Mark H Durkan, Thomas Burns, Joe Boyle, Seán Rogers as a cursory google search will show you), would disagree with that claim Peter.

  32. the problems is not any club or organization, take this from someone who loves you someones whose ancestors came from Ireland.

    The problem is the Irish both southern and northern have accepted and made heroes out of terrorists, in many ways they are the Palestinians of the Western world.

  33. The Troll, on June 4th, 2012 at 10:44 pm Said:
    The problem is the Irish both southern and northern have accepted and made heroes out of terrorists

    How is that any different then americans and the minute men?

  34. the fact that you don’t know shows how far up your ass your head is.

    Name one minute man that blew up women and children…. ya scumbag white arab

  35. Troll – The broad charge you usually make in manifest ignorance about Irish history displays a complete lack of understanding of Irish history. I’d brush up on it a bit more before such outlandish claims. Surely your political hero, Newt Gingrich would encourage you to become a historian like himself.

    As for Emerald’s comment, the American Revolution, despite being a virtual civil war in some areas, was exceptional for the 18th century in the lack of attacks on civilian populations, especially for a revolution. But is was not without them. The Gnadenhutten (for give my spelling) Massacre involved American militia who murdered 100 Indian civilians in the Western theater of the war. Such terror was not ordinary, but it certainly wasn’t absent completely.

    The crime committed by Pennsylvania Militia mind you.

  36. no British Soldiers ever planted bombs indiscrimately and deliberately planned to kill children, women and innocent bystanders, but that of course is bad form bringing up the past when it doesn’t suit; isn’t it?

    Dresden anyone?!

  37. Acting in a war is completely different than acts of terrorism, as the soldiers and airmen acted out their orders, visibly and without skulking in the shadows…

    The blitz from the Germans was just as bad, if not worse.

    Still, it must have done something to help win the war, so for that, we should be thankful.

  38. Henry,

    ‘nutjobs sent by the British Government’

    You and others like you conveniently forget that people like myself who wore a uniform and openly defended all communities from terrorism received no thanks from the many who slept in their beds at night a lot safer than if we were not there.

    The difference is that we upheld the law, the people like McCaughey and others were planning murder, mass murder and for your community to celebrate them as ‘heroes’ shows how warped your bitter thinking really is.

  39. oh so you had to find Americans slaughtering Indians to try and chastise me. Nice try, but Lets use it. It was A Pennsylvania Militia, everyone in that militia was on a roll with names and got paid. They didn’t put on ski masks and plant bombs in the local pub.

    Why don’t you bring up Wounded Knee or the fact that Custer was running for the Presidency against Grant on the platform that he would kill ALL the Indians.

    Atrocities happen in war, Irish Terror committed by Irish on Irish have not been done by any army they have been committed by cowardly pussies wearing ski masks an hiding in the shadows.

    And the Irish culture have made these murdering scum heroes, the medal proves it.

    The fact that the mother got outraged means that there are still decent people in the divided nation, so hope lives, but don’t compare Military and legal militia members to faggots hiding in the shadows.

  40. Troll,

    it speaks volumes that the mother concerned had to remain anonymous.

    Imagine?

    Speaking out against the glorification of murderers is still not acceptable to her own community.

  41. ya scumbag white arab

    Troll, you are a moral disgrace.

    Btw, I’m a not an IRA supporter, and am a keen GAA fan. It is no stretch to say there are millions like me. Peter’s comment is pure silliness (unusual for such a clear thinker).

    On the wider issue, I have no problem with this club’s decision. They have broken no rules and those who draw arbitrary lines here and there in the history of the independence movement generally either don’t know their history or have an agenda.

    In any case, as Henry has pointed out, it’s not for the GAA to adjudicate on.

  42. Peter,

    why is it not for the GAA to adjudicate on?

    Not being dicky, is it the hierarchy system, or what?

    I mean, can you imagine the IFA having medals on a junior level to some loyalist, or so called paramilitary?

    There would be gnashing of teeth from all and sundry and claims of poor us blah, blah, blah…

    If they have broken ‘no rules’, then I as a tolerant individual of most things, especially sport would take the position that the GAA is an ABSOLUTE DISGRACE and should never be allocated funds until they change and adapt to 2012.

  43. Logical Unionist

    why is it not for the GAA to adjudicate on?
    Not being dicky, is it the hierarchy system, or what?

    It’s not a hierarchy. Power in the GAA comes from the bottom up. The members make policy for the club and the clubs via delegates make policy for the association. The Central Council of the GAA has been delegated the authority to enforce the rules of the game but not to decide policy for clubs.

    The Orange Order can’t tell individual lodges what to do either

    Private lodges may disobey policies laid down by senior lodges without consequence. For example, several lodges have failed to expel members convicted of murder despite a rule stating that anyone convicted of a serious crime should be expelled

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orange_Order

  44. Henry,

    no need to be defensive, but I think that tells a bit about your position.

    I was interested to hear how the gaa works.

    Not a member of the orange order and really have no idea why you bring them up; let’s stick to the topic and discuss why a murdering ira terrorist is on medals depicted as a ‘hero’ is allowed in a supposed and laughable (non-sectarian) sport.

    Can you tell me why?

    Can you tell me if you would excuse a Billy Wright cup in the Irish League?

    Can you tell me if any terrorist from any quarter deserve anything other than contempt?

    Or is it as I believe, one rule for the oirish and another when unionists want to express our rich culture*?

    * watch the Jubilee; that is culture.

  45. where are you Henry?

    I hope you are watching the Jubilee with pride.

  46. no mahons you didn’t, you didn’t name an act by terrorists, that’s because your just stupid, your comments prove it.

    Petr, being commented on morality by a communist is laughable

  47. and I believe the expression only “Arabs kill like this” originates from the British referring to the wholesale slaughter the tribes did to each other. Just as the Irish tribes have done to each other over the past century.

    You’ve taught your children to worship murderers, and there is no defense or attack you can throw at me that will change that fact

  48. Troll – If you are going to write “your stupid” for you’re stupid, what does that make you?

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