11 3 mins 9 yrs

The internet is a great source of information and opinion.  Facts and stories delivered at an incredible speed.  However, misinformation is also delivered at the same speed.  It provides a forum for We the People.  But one has to remember that among the We the people, we have morons, cretins, the insane, anarchists and biased inventors of stories.  It is critical to not only check that one’s own facts are authentic and can be confirmed, but that the stories one posts or cites have been fact checked as well.  Alas, quite often this does not happen.  False stories, urban legends, ridiculous conspiracies and outright lies abound.  And they live despite being debunked by those who repeat the myths the face of all evidence.  And it is by no means the habit of one party or political side than another.

One of the funniest examples was the photograph utilized by some conservative blogs to demonstrate that attendance at the Glenn Beck/Tea Party rally in September 2009 on the Washington DC Mall had to be closer to their own 1.2-1.6 million crowd estimate than the unofficial estimate of the Washington DC Fire Department which opined 60-75 thousand people were present.  The photo showed a great crowd and would seem to support the Tea Party estimate until one notices the 250,000 square foot National Museum of the American Indian is absent from the photograph.  Conspicuously absent one must admit since it was built in 2004, meaning the photograph predated the rally by 5 years and therefore was a photograph of another rally.  Unless of course liberals made the building disappear for a day to discredit the Tea Party movement.

The point is not how many people attended the rally, or the merits of the rally or the merits of the opposition.  The point is that people need to have more care when citing sources, repeating stories and claiming facts.  It is human to be wrong, it is wonderful to disagree and debate, but it is mind-numbing to see deliberate falsehood and willful blindness take over.  In war they say truth is the first casualty.  On the internet it is a constant casualty.  It must be guarded against, or it will lose all meaning.

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11 thoughts on “Truth is A Constant Casualty

  1. In war they say truth is the first casualty. On the internet it is a constant casualty.

    And on Fox-Limbaa.

  2. “It is human to be wrong, it is wonderful to disagree and debate, but it is mind-numbing to see deliberate falsehood and willful blindness take over.”

    Says the bloke who’s going to vote (again) for The Kenyan.

  3. Daphne –

    There’s always staying away, that would be more useful.

    I’m not the one pontificating about the importance of truth while planning on voting for Obama, and Troll and Patty get it from me as well.

  4. No patty it is obviously the fault of the person who fell in the pit, not the fault of the person who dug it

  5. Just like Clinton was to blame for 9/11.

    Facts aren’t especially important to partisan ideologues of either persuasion, neither are numbers or dead bodies.

  6. Pete – I’ll vote for Obama over Romney. Not because It think he is the greatest or without fault, merely because I think he is the better of the two. The post was written for people like you to ignore and continue with your locked in conspiracy theories.

  7. I love this post. From a man who arrived here he said as a conservative, but is anything but, constantly calls others liars, yet posts no examples.

    You can’t even tell the truth of why your going to vote for Obama….

    Stick to topics that you at least might have a little credibility on Mahons

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