54 3 mins 14 yrs

975154641_579cc8713f.jpgThe Man Who Stole Our Pensions has now fenced most of what remained of the Sovereignty of the British poeple. We knew already that Gordon Brown is a contemptible coward, so it’s no surprise that he did the dirty deed behind closed doors. Maybe he’s looking forward to the Great Treason Trials of 2020, when the British people have finally reclaimed their inalienable freedom to govern themselves and put on trial those treasonous swine who gave away their Kingdom to a foreign power. Without a photo of him hovering over the foriegn constitution, he may imagine he can claim that the offending signature isn’t his.

So let’s be clear, what he done today is treasonous and illegal:

And I do declare that no foreign prince, person, prelate, state or potentate hath or ought to have any jurisdiction, power, superiority, pre-eminence or authority, ecclesiastical or spiritual, within this realm. So help me God."

– Bill of Rights 1689

…If any person whatsoever shall, within the United Kingdom or without, compass, imagine, invent, devise or to deprive or depose our Most Gracious Lady the Queen, …from the style, honour, or royal name of the imperial crown of the United Kingdom, in order by force or constraint to compel her… and such compassings, imaginations, inventions, devices, or intentions, or any of them, shall express, utter, or declare, by publishing any printing or writing, …or by any overt act or deed, every person so offending shall be guilty of felony, and being convicted thereof shall be liable, …to be transported beyond the seas for the term of his or her natural life.

 – Treason Felony Act 1848

You will to your uttermost bear Faith and Allegiance to the Queen’s Majesty; and will assist and defend all civil and temporal Jurisdictions, Pre-eminences, and Authorities, granted to Her Majesty and annexed to the Crown by Acts of Parliament, or otherwise, against all Foreign Princes, Persons, Prelates, States, or Potentates.

 – Privy Council Oath

As in 1972 and with every treaty since, the constitution attacks and erodes the supremacy of the Crown in Parliament. So that’s one prime minister and one foreign secretary, bang to rights.

Over at eureferendum we see the signing has moved Commission El Presidente Barroso to explaim that "the EU is preparing itself to serve its citizens better and address world issues." Sorry to disabuse you old chum, but I am not a citizen of anything. Like all Englishmen and women, I am a Liege Subject of the Crown and you can get stuffed. If that confuses Manuel, here’s the message in old, traditional English: 

bollockstobrussels001.jpg

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54 thoughts on “Be You Ever So High, The Law is Above You

  1. Dawkins –

    My argument may be rubbish, let no-one doubt my style πŸ˜‰

    And if I can actually remember where I found Gordon Chamberlain, I’ll be happy to give credit where it’s due.

  2. "…to be transported beyond the seas for the term of his or her natural life".

    We still own St Helena don’t we?

    Enjoyable posting, PM.

  3. "Without a photo of him hovering over the foriegn constitution…"

    The first photo in the Daily Mail report appears to show Brown doing the fateful deed, watched by a smirking Barroso: http://tinyurl.com/2xk3os.

    There’s one of that cockroach David Miliband signing, as well.

  4. Very good Post Pete. The art work is brilliant.

    I think GB actually brought more attention upon himself by being late, and having to go else where to sign the treaty. He ought to have been up front.

    Either than or he sought the attention deliberately.

    Broon is a treasonous plonker.

  5. "And if I can actually remember where I found Gordon Chamberlain, I’ll be happy to give credit where it’s due."

    You better, or ABC will be on your case and you’ll never here the end of it.

  6. Not to worry, just wait until the EU tries to ban, or place some sort of limits upon our enjoyment of football. (I mean they’re bound to sooner or later: people enjoy it too much.) That’s when the real revolution will start. But not until then….

  7. I’ve thought about those ‘treason trials’ and almost the entire poliical clique from 1970 onwards would be there.

  8. Typhoo,

    "I think GB actually brought more attention upon himself by being late…"

    Omigosh. It never occurred to me before your post that Broon shares his initials with Great Britain!

    This must mean something. But what?

  9. So as England no longer exists as a free and independant country, becoming just another state in the motherland of the EU how does it feel to have slid away into the nothingness of union. What was once Great and Britain has gasped it’s last breath, the Kingdom is dead all hail Brussels I post THIS as a prophecy

  10. Troll,

    as Albion slips ‘neath the waves, at least us poor wretches will have the satisfaction to know someone, somewhere is laughing at us.

  11. Meanwhile all those ‘Europhile New English’, are relishing their conquest and shouting down the mumblings and grumblings of us indigenes, describing us as ‘Little Englanders’, exonophobics, and much else.

    Well, good luck guys! you can now carry the financial and moral burden of funding and policing much of the world a seen from a NATO and UN perspective. I doubt that you will do half as good a job as the ‘old management’ did.

    But then you can do the modern thing and shrug your shoulders and describe each and every disaster as ‘unforeseen’, and you can claim that ‘lessons have been learned’, – if only…

  12. I have come to offer my condolences. I am horrified. I am not laughing, neither is Troll. We are mourning the once great nation, Britain. Our brothers and sisters. Good luck with the coming revolution. Stay strong, we are behind you 100%. God bless.

  13. So as England no longer exists as a free and independant country

    Ah sure it was all downhill from the act of Union with Scotland in 1707. Once you start down the road of joining up with other countries its hard to get out of the habit… πŸ˜‰

  14. Troll, Monica, Daphne,

    don’t mind my little gallows humour. I intend to do my share in the coming revolution. But, as ever, I point out the exact same things are happening in your country. The globalists want to erase national sovereignty, whether it be in Europe, or at this Bali conference, or turning a blind eye to millions of illegals in America, or letting Mexican trucks run on American roads (because of a ‘trade agreement’), building the you-know-what Daphne etc. Vigilance, my friends, is the price of freedom.

  15. Maybe he’s looking forward to the Great Treason Trials of 2020, when the British people have finally reclaimed their inalienable freedom to govern themselves and put on trial those treasonous swine who gave away their Kingdom to a foreign power.

    Good luck with the coming revolution.

    I intend to do my share in the coming revolution

    Do you guys really expect a revolution? If so what form will it take?

  16. "but I am not a citizen of anything. Like all Englishmen and women, I am a Liege Subject of the Crown and you can get stuffed"

    You are wrong there Pete Moore. You have been a citizen rather than subject since the British Nationality Act of 1981.

  17. Kloot,

    I think a peaceful revolution is necessary, a violent one is neither likely nor desirable. We have seen such peaceful upheavals around the world. The communist bloc collapsed in East/Central Europe without too much violence.

    The power of the people is huge, which is why elites have always laboured to keep us dumb, disunited and scared.

    Garfield,

    without wishing to join this argument, I’d say it is another example of the problems of creating more and more laws, with less and less regard for the fundamental common law of the land. Probably both you and Pete are correct.

  18. I think a peaceful revolution is necessary, a violent one is neither likely nor desirable

    A violent one would be doomed to failure as it would almost certainly be considered terrorist in nature.

    What I wonder though is, is there enough people that care strongly about these issues for action to ever happen. The only people who seem to openly protest these days, the ones that come into conflict with the state, are those against globalisation. When was the last time that people came out on to the streets in numbers over any issue ?

    Are most people these days more likely to balk at the effect that any revolution or upsetting of the cart might have on their jobs or pensions. The instability that would be caused would scare most from taking action. For instance, This fear of instability is probably one of the major factors keeping Scotland within the UK, in the sense that people do not like large scale change and fear the economic and political upset that may happen.

    People are docile are they not, once they have jobs, pensions, can afford to pay the mortgage, arent being harassed and can raise their families in peace. Some may perceive that the EU is in fact impinging on those comfort feelings, but do enough people feel that way ?

  19. RC,
    Common Law is below Statute in the legal pecking order so the Nationality Act applies.

    But I agree that English law is becoming more and more codified but that is more the work of the EU and its regulations and directives than it is of British legislators.

  20. Garfield,

    I won’t argue with that. As far as I’m concerned the English legal system is like a wall that’s been papered over so many times, the room’s getting smaller and smaller. If we could strip all that away and get back to the good, clean, straightforward common law, it would be a merrier place by far.

    Kloot,

    I can’t disagree with anything you say. The majority will always keep their heads down. The American Revolution, for instance was brought about by a small minority. But it’s never possible to completely control the masses, and you never know when something may come up. In Italy around 1990 there was a massive upheaval when it came to light that the secret intelligence services were behind the Bologna bombing of 1980 and other terrorist attacks. The whole political establishment went into a tailspin. You never know, a spark may fall, though the gunpowder is indeed damp.

  21. Good luck with your "revolution" LMAO!

    Could someone tell me what this revolution will look like. Vance and McCann with AKs, is that it? πŸ™‚

  22. JG,

    laugh all you like. I said clearly that I was not referring to a bloody revolution, so your reference to AKs is asinine. If you find the idea so ludicrous, go compare an atlas of Europe from 1988 with one from today.

    No doubt the vast majority of the people will always prefer slumping on a sofa, scratching their pubes to engaging in political action, but events can and do happen that change the course of politics. I give you one suggestion: If Scotland sought independence, this would have ramifications that cannot be predicted with certainty.

  23. RC,

    Sure thing. I don’t disagree with you. You might have noticed I was poking fun more than making a serious point.

    There’ll be no revolution though and Britain will remain in the EU for as long as any of us posting here will live. I can’t really see how it will be otherwise but of course anything can happen. I think most people posting here are armchair activists at best, just an impression I get. Changing the world by posting comments on a blog!

    I thought Monica’s comment WAS hilarious though, in a cringe-worthy, cheesey Hollywood movie kind of way:

    We are mourning the once great nation, Britain. Our brothers and sisters. Good luck with the coming revolution. Stay strong, we are behind you 100%. God bless

    Oh dear!

  24. hey Kloot just a question the dates and examples you quote above especially Scotland and N Ireland what you call union don’t they call dominance and haven’t they been trying to get their independance eversince?

  25. hey Kloot just a question the dates and examples you quote above especially Scotland and N Ireland what you call union don’t they call dominance and haven’t they been trying to get their independance eversince?

    Some do and some dont I suppose, thats the nature of the union. I can see your point and believe me I agree. Im all in favour of any country having the right to opt of the Union as much as they had the choice of joining. So if a referendum were held and a majority of the UK wished to leave, then so it must be.

  26. So if a referendum were held and a majority of the UK wished to leave, then so it must be.

    Just to back up that point a little more. Id consider myself pro EU, however, im disgusted at the way it by passes the people in its decisions. I live the ROI where any changes of this sort must be put to the people, and this is something we value. The EU, I feel, often puts too much weight in the power of the politicians to speak for those they elected. Even if the politicians of the constituent countries are pro EU, the voice of the people should also be given a chance to speak

  27. If Scotland sought independence, this would have ramifications that cannot be predicted with certainty.

    Now there in lies an interesting point. It may be, that England’s only route out of the EU, is through Scotland existing the UK. My logic being, with the UK in political turmoil as a result, it may be that a new political dispensation comes to the fore which gives expression to the anti EU, pro England views of quite a few. Scotland I believe would opt into the EU, theres no guarantee they would automatically qualify. Wales might also, lets not open the Pandora’s box around where NI may see itself.

  28. well it’s certainly going to provide you guys with some interesting political battles over the next 10 or so years. You’ve got to figure that a lot of the pros and cons are not going to become evident right away

  29. You’ve got to figure that a lot of the pros and cons are not going to become evident right away

    There is discussion in the EU at the moment of tax reform. Basically they want to harmonise corporate tax rates, amongst others across the EU.

    Already the view is being aired, that they are holding off announcing the implementation or plans to implement such reform until after the Irish have held their referendum. The logic being, that if announced beforehand, the Irish will soundly reject the treaty. Being able to set your taxation levels is a core feature of a sovereign state. Weve leart that control over taxation means the ability to set good fiscal policy.

    As a pro EU person, I find this more then annoying. IM all for being part of an EU where even the small countries have input. But ive no interest in being part of an EU, solely dominated by the demands of the big two hitters, France and Germany.

  30. JG,

    "I think most people posting here are armchair activists at best, just an impression I get. Changing the world by posting comments on a blog!"

    This is not a personal dig, rather a statement of banal fact, but it’s easy to mock and be apathetic. The atomised individual has little influence, and our consumerist culture reinforces this at every level.

    Kloot,

    re: a Scotland/England separation, I’d go along with what you say, and recall Rumsfeld’s famous axion on ‘known unknowns’ etc.

  31. What melodrama and absolute nonsense there is in this thread.

    And there will be no revolution. Not even by a minority.

  32. Come on Alison, you don’t want to be a dumbed-down couch potato, join the revolution! We’ll let you hang a couple of judges, if you like.

  33. join the revolution! We’ll let you hang a couple of judges, if you like.

    Will there be nice t-shirts? πŸ™‚

    Ya cant beat a bit of pre-pub Friday banter on politics.

  34. > My logic being, with the UK in political turmoil as a result, it may be that a new political dispensation comes to the fore which gives expression to the anti EU, pro England views of quite a few

    There’s no need. If Scotland dissolves the Union, there is no "UK" anymore. Therefore both Scotland and England will be out of the EU.

  35. RC

    As someone i greatly respect here for your brain and wit, do you not think the whole doom thing is a bit rich – you know given that we’ve been in the EU now for a nos of years, have just invested a fortune in strengthening our military capability to stand alongside America, have the biggest defence spend in Europe and whilst in the EU threw a whole lot of troops at America’s wars – whilst the rest of the world stood by thumbing their noses. Even after the treaty is signed – we will still be doing the most heavy lifting.

    Domestically we are virtually at parallels. More shit floats downstream from American PC to be sucked up here than ever comes out of Europe – us having not signed up to the EU Social Charter and all.

    And as for freedoms – see Magna Carta post. Should i lament and hang my headin sorrow if Hilary gets in next year to boot! I mean – come on!

    I think the comments here are beyond contempt

  36. There’s no need. If Scotland dissolves the Union, there is no "UK" anymore. Therefore both Scotland and England will be out of the EU.

    Interesting point.

  37. There’s no need. If Scotland dissolves the Union, there is no "UK" anymore. Therefore both Scotland and England will be out of the EU.

    Thinking this through further though. The UK continued to exist once the 26 counties opted out, therefore the UK would continue to exist if Scotland left, although a more slimmed down UK.

  38. Therefore both Scotland and England will be out of the EU.

    If the UK breaks up Scotland will JOIN the EU. It will then be virtually impossible for England to remain isolated.

  39. Alison,

    "oh, go on then!" – I thought I’d get your achilles’ heal with that!

    I can’t speak for the general drift of conversation, only part (in its downfall!)

    I see the path of status quo taking us further and further into a managed society, run by experts, where the population are dumbed down and infantilised by consumerism and the state. I don’t want to travel that path.

    The alternative is to argue against it, and when the rope comes near me, start pulling on the end of it. Therefore, when the state says ‘we need more cameras, laws, regulations, commissions, and porkbarrel projects’ I say ‘No! We need less!’

    When I talk of revolution, I’m not talking about grabbing a rifle and barricading Lewisham highstreet. For a start, I don’t have a rifle. Nevertheless, the one power that can change things is the people. An example drawn from recent events was the revolt in America against the Government’s plans to amnesty millions of illegals. It would have gone through if the public hadn’t made such a noise about it.

    There is a ‘democratic deficit’ and the political class know it. Fringe parties cannot break the duopoly of Lab/Con, but events may bring changes. Scotland leaving the union would be such an event. If the Tories win the next election, that could be more likely, who can say? If the Tories don’t win the next election, maybe they’ll finally break in two, and the political map will be withdrawn. If the Irish vote down the EU treaty, who knows where that will lead, or perhaps the Danish will force the issue?

    I’ve gotta go now.

  40. If the Irish vote down the EU treaty, who knows where that will lead, or perhaps the Danish will force the issue?

    One things for sure, if the Irish do vote down the EU treaty, the immediate reaction will be to call us an ungrateful bunch of so and so’s. Although some will heap praise.

    I’ve gotta go now.

    Take it handy.

  41. RC

    This is not a personal dig, rather a statement of banal fact, but it’s easy to mock and be apathetic. The atomised individual has little influence, and our consumerist culture reinforces this at every level.

    I’m not being cynical but I have to laugh at people who make grand revolutionary statements on blogs and then return to the living room and plant their arse back on the sofa. They’re only fooling themselves. Individuals can make a differene if they get off their arses.

  42. I’ll be flying the tricolour if you do!

    Thumbs up!

    They are expecting the referendum to be called some time early in the new year. If I remember correctly, at the time of the Nice treaty the were accusations against the No camp that they were receiving donations from UK interested parties. I wonder if this will be attempted this time around.

  43. Garfield –

    You have been a citizen rather than subject since the British Nationality Act of 1981.

    ‘Fraid not. Look again at the title of this post. Just becasue Parliament decrees something, it does not make it so. To be a Subject of the Crown is the birthright of all subjects.

    Parliament is merely part of Her Majesty’s domain. It has no sovereignty. The status of ‘Subject’ holds between the Crown and the British people. It is not within the gift of Parliament to bestow or remove that status.

    Parliament may as well state that the moon is made of cheese.

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