14 1 min 9 yrs

The sheeple who think Stormont makes any real difference to their lives MIGHT want to reflect on this financial auditing news of the great and the not so good ;

  • Health trusts and education boards are failing to pay half their bills on time.
  • £1.1m paid to staff at five education boards relating to work for which fees weren’t legally required.
  • A controversial land deal which saw a site bought for £9.7m by a housing association — on the same day it was sold for £6.5m.
  • £400,000 spent by Ilex on projects without proper approval.
  • Stormont’s top department, OFMDFM, spent £1.6m on the Maze/Long Kesh project despite approval being rescinded.
  • Benefit fraud and error costing almost £54m, with customer fraud soaring by 45% to £22m in 2011.

Thank goodness we have OUR incompetents wasting OUR cash, right?  Baaaaaaaa..

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14 thoughts on “THANK GOODNESS FOR STORMONT

  1. Sometimes I wonder whether Convolution accidentally and meaninglessly included a “tiredness factor” into the human race. By which I mean that periodically human societies like individuals grow old and tired and sclerotic. They simply give up, and this tiredness starts to spread throughout the whole structure. So it’s not just Stormont, it’s everywhere in the older Western democracies..

  2. Agit8ed,

    An astute observation! – but isn’t that process at the very heart of nature? – not just human nature, but of nature per se.

    A galaxy wide stellar phenomenom, that might be called the ultimate example of ‘constructive destruction’.

    In the case of humanity the irony is that we always provide the seeds of our own destruction.

    Who really knows where we came from? – who knows where we are going?

  3. Ernest,
    Ta!
    Is it only as we get older as individuals that we see these patterns, do you think?
    I do.
    I find myself starting not to care about administrative things in the way I once did. I forget, I can’t be bothered. I fall asleep in the evening. My driving’s not so sharp as it was..
    AS you know I don’t believe in Convolution Evolution. I still believe we are created in the image of God; that He is far more wonderful than we could ever imagine, and that He loves us.
    As it says in Psalm 103 verses 13 to 18..

    “13 Like as a father pitieth his children, so the Lord pitieth them that fear him.

    14 For he knoweth our frame; he remembereth that we are dust.

    15 As for man, his days are as grass: as a flower of the field, so he flourisheth.

    16 For the wind passeth over it, and it is gone; and the place thereof shall know it no more.
    17 But the mercy of the Lord is from everlasting to everlasting upon them that fear him, and his righteousness unto children’s children;

    18 To such as keep his covenant, and to those that remember his commandments to do them.

    The world ages just as we do Ernest, and all things pass.

  4. Agi, you would get on well with some of our elected representatives here, mainly the ones who believe the Earth to be 6,000 years old…

    Do you believe that, by the way?

  5. Seimi,
    So let me get this straight.
    You’ve never met me, yet you think I would get on well with your elected representatives?!
    Tongue in cheek, huh?
    I believe God created the Cosmos. That He is independent of it, that He instituted the laws and processes that both govern and ensure our existence, and that if He wanted to He could have created the earth in six days.
    But I don’t think He did.
    The idea of the earth being six thousand years old was thought up over a pint of Guinness, by Bishop Ussher in the 17th century.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Ussher
    He was Irish, by the way..
    What can you expect?

  6. Whoa Agi! Bit cranky this morning?
    Yes, it was more than a bit tongue in cheek, ok?
    However, your beliefs do mirror those of some of our elected representatives, which is why I thought I would have a bit of a joke with you. Sorry if you misplaced your sense of humour!

    ‘…and that if He wanted to He could have created the earth in six days.
    But I don’t think He did.’

    So, he could have if he wanted to, but chose not to? That sounds like a bit of a cop out…So what process created the Earth then? Evolution perhaps?

    ‘The idea of the earth being six thousand years old was thought up over a pint of Guinness, by Bishop Ussher in the 17th century.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Ussher
    He was Irish, by the way..
    What can you expect?’

    Cheap dig at the Irish? Well done, Agi – classy stuff.

  7. Seimi,
    We have to work on our communication!
    I am not cranky (this morning anyway), but some types of humour require my adjusting to them.
    So sorry for that.

    Re Creation what I meant was the time scale. I think God could have done it in six literal days -or even instantly: just like Jesus turned the water into wine at the wedding..
    However, as I keep saying there can be no disagreement between true faith and true science, and anyway more important to me is how endless amounts of mindless time, plus mindless matter or energy and mindless chance resulted in us. You cannot have true meaning and worth based on a cosmic accident. Even the formation, duplication and mutation of cells into organised organisms makes no sense.
    WHY would anything mobilise and organise UPWARDS if everything is meaningless?

  8. ‘WHY would anything mobilise and organise UPWARDS if everything is meaningless?’

    Because that’s just nature? Constantly improving itself in order to adapt and survive?

    The problem I have with your view on this is that you believe there is a ‘Cosmic endgame’, a peak or summit, which humans (and only humans) strive to reach (or are even allowed to reach); a state of perfection, where humanity is at one with a Supreme Being. What happens after that? Eternity in that state of being? Eternity, in any form, is still eternity. Is there room in this state of being for regression? Can humanity decide that, having experienced life eternal on the right hand of God, that they actually preferred it when there was something to strive towards?

    I don’t believe that there is an ultimate goal or form for humans, any more than there is an ultimate goal or form for a star, or a potato. I think each one changes throughout its own life cycle, and each one is a slightly different, slightly more evolved version of the one that came before it. I don’t think that’s God’s plan. I think that’s just science and nature.

  9. Lots of good stuff there Seimi,
    Just look at what you are saying..
    “Because that’s just nature? Constantly improving itself in order to adapt and survive?”

    Why would anything that happened in a meaningless, accidental, uncaring cosmos want to improve itself in order to adapt and survive? Why?
    Go back in time to when that first cell happened. Or were there many of them? Why would something mindless want to improve? Even accepting mutations, you are still attributing meaning to their upward development, and I am saying that if all is meaningless why assume that they WANTED to develop?
    The Bible says before Creation the earth was formless and void. There was nothing.
    Now as to your ” Is there room in this state of being for regression?” I was talking about this to an old Christian friend about this a couple of weekends ago.
    I would start by saying that I cannot imagine being in a state of eternity!
    I also accept your statement about having something to strive towards. In fact all of your points I have considered over time.
    And what I came to (not saying I’m right of course) was that in THIS life I accept the Bible’s definition of me as a sinner, so that the birth, life and death of Jesus Christ was/is relevant to me.
    I have met so many people whose lives had been incredibly changed by faith in Jesus Christ.
    So I am a work in progress with lots of faults-some you have pointed out to me over the months we have blogged together.

    What happens after I die? I go to be with Jesus. He said “In my Father’s house there are many mansions” So as we know, there are solar systems a-plenty in the universe. I don’t know what all happens after death, and whether or not I will continue to have free will and the opportunity to choose wrongly.
    I don’t WANT to do wrong stuff, I don’t want to do my own thing, because when you look at it Seimi, where has our freedom led us to?
    Gotta go!

  10. ‘Why would anything that happened in a meaningless, accidental, uncaring cosmos want to improve itself in order to adapt and survive? Why?’

    Because that’s life, Agi. Nature strives to survive. In order to do that, it evolves.

    ‘Why would something mindless want to improve? Even accepting mutations, you are still attributing meaning to their upward development, and I am saying that if all is meaningless why assume that they WANTED to develop?’

    You’re attributing feelings and emotions to cells, Agi. That’s confusing the matter. A cell’s function, it’s reason for existing, is to multiply and replicate itself. It doesn’t WANT to do it, it’s why it was formed in the first place.

    ‘I have met so many people whose lives had been incredibly changed by faith in Jesus Christ.’

    I’m sure you have. So have I. However, I could easily counter that by saying that I have met so many people whose lives had been incredibly changed by realising that following organised religion was pointless and that living their lives as well as they could, without the restraints of religious identity was a much better option for them.

    ‘I don’t know what all happens after death, and whether or not I will continue to have free will and the opportunity to choose wrongly.’

    So you place your faith in someone and something who may or may not remove your ability to make your own choices? Because the opportunity to choose wrongly is also the opportunity to learn by our mistakes, and if you remove that, leaving only the opportunity to choose right(ly), you remove all doubt, all curiosity, all ingenuity, all inventiveness, in fact all the things that make us special.

    ‘I don’t WANT to do wrong stuff, I don’t want to do my own thing, because when you look at it Seimi, where has our freedom led us to?’

    No-one is perfect, Agi (apart, apparently, from Colm 😉 ), and everyone makes mistakes. We all of us occasionally do things we know to be wrong. When we do something ‘wrong’, but can see that by doing so, we will achieve a bigger ‘right’, does that diminish the ‘wrongness’ of the initial act? Hypothetically, if you could go back in time and assassinate Hitler, would that ‘wrong’ act, ie. murder, be less wrong because of all the other lives you would ultimately save?

    Our ‘freedom’ has led us to scientific breakthroughs. It has put humans on the moon, sent spacecraft to other planets and out beyond our solar system. It has cured disease, saved lives. It has put us head and shoulders above all other life forms on this planet, with one exception – we still kill hundreds of thousands of our fellow human beings every year in the names of our various ‘Gods’.

    See ye later 🙂

  11. //You cannot have true meaning and worth based on a cosmic accident.//

    Oh, yes you can. Meaning is assigned by man to many “random” things – the shape of the clouds, tea leaves, the position of the stars in the sky, the course of unpredictable events. That’s the way superstitions and religions arise.

    Two days ago, my wife saw some kind of bird on a tree and that reminded her that our tax returns are due. The same sign would have meant something else, or nothing at all, to somebody else. That’s the way “meaning”, and by extention the different human cultures, work. Meaning is created by human minds and doesn’t exist in any a priori signals sent intentionally.

  12. “You’re attributing feelings and emotions to cells, Agi. That’s confusing the matter. A cell’s function, it’s reason for existing, is to multiply and replicate itself. It doesn’t WANT to do it, it’s why it was formed in the first place.”

    Sorry Seimi,
    I’m playing “catch up” because you came out with some real meaty stuff that I am more than happy to listen to and debate. Which just goes to show that we could sit down together and establish a rapport based on our humanity rather than our cultural identity 😉
    I wasn’t attributing emotions to cells, I was questioning WHY cells want to multiply and replicate. YOU assume that Seimi, because we as humans make assumptions based on our experience and values.
    Take that away. Place yourself in a cold heartless and meaningless cosmos. There are stars, there are solar systems, there are vast spaces of nothingness, and you NEVER, EVER come to the end of it.
    So if we accept that this cosmic event happened in a meaningless universe, WHAT prompted those cells to WANT to multiply and replicate??

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