38 2 mins 9 yrs

It is 15 years since the Belfast Agreement came into being. Oh yes, I remember it well –  as the song goes!

Northern Ireland must “consolidate the gains” of peace, says the US secretary of state, ahead of the 15th anniversary of the Good Friday Agreement. John Kerry, who replaced Hillary Clinton, said progress was “significant and inspiring” but the promise envisaged by the deal was “incomplete”.

Yes it is an inspiration to have a government that will not tolerate an  opposition; to have an Administration that contains bombers and terrorist godfathers;  to have millions of pounds thrown at what are euphemistically known as ..cough “community workers” lest they go back to what they used to do so well; to have a policing service that is politicised from top to bottom and which persecutes those who stand up for our British symbols; to have record unemployment; to have greater levels of polarisation than when this rotten process started.

Oh yes, Mr Kerry, it has been a TREMENDOUS achievement and kept alive by those who share one common goal – the suppression of terrorism through political triangulation at any cost.

Let’s call it for what it is and let’s not be too surprised when OTHER Irish republican terrorists realise the true lesson of Good Friday 15 years ago – if you KILL enough people and wreck enough property in expensive parts of England then you will find a political establishment seeking to reward you.

Lest you are in doubt – TERRORISM pays.

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38 thoughts on “WHEN APPEASEMENT BECOMES AN INSPIRATION

  1. David, when someone talks about the 15 years since the GFA without once even mentioning the huge change seen by everyone and everywhere in Northern Ireland – the end to killings, mayhem, destruction and fear of the same – it is all too evident what motivates you: political frustration at the loss of a time when, while people were being murdered every day, your community could at least consider itself top dog and had the British army in place to do its dirty work for it.

  2. “Lest you are in doubt – TERRORISM pays.”

    …as the existence of NI testifies.

    I actually voted against the GFA because of a) the principle of consent; and b) the release of some very unpleasant characters on both sides. Nevertheless, it was more a protest vote than anything else. I can clearly recognise that the Peace Process has improved life in the north beyond recognition.

  3. Yes it is an inspiration to have a government that will not tolerate an opposition; to have an Administration that contains bombers and terrorist godfathers; to have millions of pounds thrown at what are euphemistically known as ..cough “community workers” lest they go back to what they used to do so well; to have a policing service that is politicised from top to bottom and which persecutes those who stand up for our British symbols; to have record unemployment; to have greater levels of polarisation than when this rotten process started

    Why are you speaking about the Government of Northen Ireland? It may have been in autocratic existence for fifty years but it was prorogued more than forty years ago.

    Excuse the flippancy, I’ll take my tongue out of my cheek long enough to say that Noel has it 100% correct in the first post on this thread.

    I don’t know why I bother commenting on David’s NI posts as they are becoming more and more like an echo chamber. He’ll put up a thread and then refuse to comment when taken to task on it. Now, I know that he’s a busy man but he reminds me of a young Ian Paisley throwing snowballs at Seán Lemass’s car in the sense that (to use a colloquialism) he’ll make snowballs and get others to throw them.

  4. The fact remains that any point about Northern Ireland being an appeasement of terrorism now can also be made about Northern Ireland for its entire history. And those who oppose the current structures because the appease terrorism are probably not going to argue for the ending of the existence of Northern Ireland simply because it appeased terrorism.

  5. I don’t think the political structures and creation of the Assembly as determined by the Belfast Agreement was an appeasement of terrorism, but the block release of all conflict related prisoners was.

  6. //an appeasement of terrorism, but the block release of all conflict related prisoners was.//

    The release of prisoners was generally welcomed by their respective communities, i.e. almost everyone in NI welcomed the release of some “terrorists”.

    It therefore wasn’t so much an attempt to appease any organisations, or “terrorism”, but simply a recognitiion of the fact that these organisations had widespread support among the population and no new peace arrangement would work if they continued to be excluded from it.

  7. Colm –

    On the contrary.

    It’s an irony that, whereas the Left loves a liberation movement (if the liberators are a favoured class or race), and whereas a Leftist will argue all day long that one man’s terrorist is another’s freedom fighter, the founding of NI is the superlative example of a liberation movement. The problem they have is that the liberators have always lacked the class or race consciousness necessary for any sympathy or support.

  8. The founding of NI is the superlative example of a liberation movement.

    Absolute bollocks. It was contrdictory to the overwhelming wishes of the Irish electorate and was a contrived state formed at the point of a gun and based on an artifically manufactured sectarian majority.

    When you agree with Cornish liberation Pete then you can spout all the spheres you want about the NI state.

  9. //the liberators have always lacked the class or race consciousness necessary //

    Pete, there were few people in history more class conscious than the Unionists who set up Northern Ireland.

  10. I think Pete is taking the piss a little.

    The creation of NI was a success for terrorist Balkanisation. Why was/is the arbitrary farce that is NI allowed to determine its existence? Why not Tyrone? South Down/Armagh? Ballycastle? My house?

  11. Pete

    Would you also agree that the events of the Easter Rising through to the 1921 founding of the Free State was also a superlative example of a Liberation movement ?

  12. Yes, I reckon Pete posted his 12.05 with a “Lets rile the lefties and the Irish nationalists at the same time ” smile on his face 🙂

  13. Paul McMahon –

    I have no problem with Cornish liberation. I’m all in favour of our ancient kingdoms escaping from the Norman yoke. I did once say so in here, I seem to remember.

  14. Colm –

    My 12.05pm was a serious point which could only rile Leftists because it uses their language back at them.

  15. My 12.05pm was a serious point which could only rile Leftists because it uses their language back at them

    It’s also absolute bollocks.

    I have no problem with Cornish liberation

    Interesting position for a unionist.

  16. Paul McMahon –

    You can only be a unionist where people want to stay together. If the people of Gibraltar and the Falklands wanted to be Spanish and Argentinian, goodbye and good luck.

    Holding a union (or breaking one apart) by force isn’t that so wise.

  17. So you don’t agree with the union of GB & NI? You’re savvy enough to know Pete that Gib & the Falklands aren’t part of the union and are classed as ‘British Overseas Territories’

    Holding a union (or breaking one apart) by force isn’t that so wise

    For once I agree. The unionists did it in Ireland in 1922 and the shock waves are still felt there to this day. (which kinda negates your points on this thread)

  18. Paul

    It’s a tricky point. It could be argued that as the area of Ireland that remained in the Union post 1922 contained a majority that wished for that outcome, the settlement wasn’t an act of force but was the best possible compromise albeit clumsy and controversial.

  19. The settlement wasn’t an act of force? C’mon Colm, & there were at least two of the six counties that had a Nationalist majority were they a ‘majority that wished for that outcome’?

  20. Paul

    I am not saying it was ideal and yes I should have clarified that it most certainly was an appeasement of the threat of force but I do genuinely believe that the Westminster government had no malicious intent and were just trying to find the best solution. I don’t praise or respect the northern Unionists though, as cleary they did not give a damn for the wishes, aspirations and identity of the Nationalist population anywhere on the island.

  21. I know that you’re not a particular friend of Northern unionism Colm. The above comment was not a reflection on you merely a comment regarding the historical realities of the Treaty.

    It’s ironic that David has billed this thread as appeasement when the state of NI was a text book demonstration of appeasement to a small, potentially violent minority but then I sometimes think that irony is lost on unionists.

  22. Paul

    Absolute principles rarely survive the worlds of political/social discussions. There is only “My side right,your side wrong” – even when the behaviour is effectively identical !

  23. Well you know what they say Paul – It’s not what you do with your Chopper, its who the Chopper is attached to that matters 😉

  24. Ah, you never fail to please. I gave you that penalty kick for a reason, (and there’s another one 🙂 )

  25. David – You are indeed a community of 1, which explains the number of votes you have gotten in elections. (drumroll please).

    The truth is NI is a better place and despite stops and starts in the process the process has worked and is a marvel.

  26. Ireland started going downhill at the opening of the 20th century when the loyalists brought in shipments of arms, then the First World War, then a bunch of yahoos took over the GPO in Dublin for a few days, then a bunch of jumped-up bigots built an opulent palace for themselves at Stormont. Since then Ireland has been a place of poor politics and poor people. Since then there has been corrupt politics, the occasional failed rebellion, good people emigrating, organized crime, republican and loyalist terrorists in government in the North and generally crooks and liars in government in the South. The Republic takes its marching orders from Germans with the begging bowl always stretched out, the North has a government of terrorists of both persuasions who are incompetent, hate each other but have to smile before their paymaster, HMG.

    We keep it going because it is where our ancestors were from, but we’re very glad they got the hell out of the place. Those who remain there should realize we really don’t really expect much from them given their record, but don’t mess up the place, try not to kill each other and make some attempt to get along better – or else…

  27. //Ireland started going downhill at the opening of the 20th century //

    Yep, before that it was Shangri La, wasn’t it? – with regular famine, mass evictions, constant poverty, the highest infant motality rate in Europe, mass emigration, and a country ruled by bigots for whom the Irish were an inferior species.

    There is no way a small country could be rid of the oppression of the largest empire the world has ever known without bloodshed and a lot of confusion.
    But the price was well worth paying: Ireland became a nation with its own identity and culture, it was a free player and could enter into alliances as it thought fit, wealth, undreamed of in what NY likes to think were the golden days, was created and the country knew a level of peace and prosperity that it had never known before and could never have realised under the British crown.

    All started by the great men of 1916, the noblest of their generation.

  28. All started by the great men of 1916, the noblest of their generation

    Absolutely. Well said Noel.

  29. In the years immediately before 1916 Ireland was in better shape than the many centuries of poverty and dysfunction before and on its way to becoming a smaller version of Canada or Australia. Then a bunch of violent fanatics threw the place into unnecessary chaos. There followed over seven decades of poor government in the South featuring poverty and repression with a brief respite in the last twenty years and now back to the poor old times. All traceable to the fanatics of 1916 who threw the nation off course. Their undemocratic actions led directly to partition and the mess that is Northern Ireland. Meanwhile Canada and Australia evolved into peaceful and prosperous liberal democracies.

  30. In the years immediately before 1916 Ireland was in better shape than the many centuries of poverty and dysfunction before

    What absolute rubbish.

    Their undemocratic actions led directly to partition and the mess that is Northern Ireland

    More revisionist rubbish. What led directly to Ireland being partitioned was the undemocratic actions of barristers, some British politicians, sections of the British Army and tens of thousands of variously assorted Empirists, religious nuts, rogues and madmen and their anti Home Rule movement from 1912 onwards.

  31. //In the years immediately before 1916 Ireland was in better shape than the many centuries of poverty and dysfunction before//

    Things were also pretty good in the first decades of the 19th C due to the Napoleon wars. Practically every cottage and cabin had an income; the population of Ireland doubled within a few decades.
    As soon as the war was over, there was no need for textiles and this huge peasantry on the land became an unwelcome burden. Fortunately, this situation resulted in the famine, when the surplus population was wiped out by starvation and emigration.
    The situation “In the years immediately before 1916” was similar. The war brought work, and then there were all those pensions and wages paid for the cannon fodder in France.
    You seem to think that after the war, as even Britain itself faced mass unemployment, destitution, strikes, mutinies and riots, that our British masters would have been kind enough to spare Ireland, and given us better treatment than they were prepared to give their own people.

    //becoming a smaller version of Canada or Australia.//

    Bullshit. Behind the face of British administration there was a bigoted anti-Catholic and anti-Irish heart. Ireland could never have become a Canada even if it wanted to.

    When Canada applied for home rule, Britain yielded gracefully. When Ireland tried the same, that majority wish was denied, manipulated and oppressed for half a century. After such coercion, interspersed with periods of famine and mass evictions, the only honest relationship Irishmen and Englishmen was one of firing guns into each other’s faces.
    When Irishmen finally stood up to them and gave them a bit of their own medicine, they got all soft and gave us more than could ever have been achieved through a parliamentary home rule bill. Notwithstanding the tragedy of the Civil War – a British inspired conflict about a British dictated document – Ireland was finally freed from the neglect, bigotry and racial hatred it had endured for centuries.

  32. By the 1870s and 1880s Ireland was developing well with a growing educated Catholic middle class and an important cultural rebirth. Then a bunch of yahoos undemocratically decided to pull a revolution a century after the age of revolution in Europe. The result was partition, mass poverty, repression, immigration, denial of civil rights and acceptance of criminality by those in government similar to what they pulled when they were in revolution mode. Their undemocratic actions throttled the liberal 32 county country that was organically developing. If it were not for a boneheaded Brit general who ordered executions of the 1916 leaders rather then sending them off-shore, the revolution would probably have failed.

    Some people’s irrational hate of the Brits clouds their judgment so that they cannot learn the lessons of their history and instead fall to the level of slogans and ballads of the ole times. There is no future for that mindset.

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