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LAZIEST PEOPLE EVER?

By David Vance On April 3rd, 2013

Are Teaching Trade unions the LAZIEST people ever?

TEACHERS were accused of wanting an “easy life” last night after calling for no more than 20 hours a week in the classroom. Delegates at the National Union of Teachers’ conference, said some members were left with little time to eat, talk, think or even go to the toilet.  Christopher Denson told the conference that many teachers were saying their workload was now “totally unsustainable”.

I would like to ask local teachers for their opinion on this issue but they currently are on their Easter break, following their mid-term break, following their two week Christmas break…

 

28 Responses to “LAZIEST PEOPLE EVER?”

  1. It’s not the time in classroom that’s the problem: it’s all the silly regulations and ‘compliance’ demands on teachers that are making their working week difficult. I’d say that teaching used to be a calling but any genuine wish to help hildren is now being strangled by the government. The teachers’ union has a point here.

  2. The ‘c’ on my keyboard is playing up, ‘children’.

  3. I actually know someone who is a teacher. My daughter-in-law is a deputy head at a northern city primary school. She does about 50-60 hours a week. She belongs to a union for self-protection. She doesn’t go on strike and provides biscuits for her class to get them thru’ the morning. Many of them don’t get breakfast. She would really like to encourage parents by shooting a few.

  4. Doesn’t this story bear a strong resemblance to parts of the NHS?

    I refer to our current system of GP services, where surgeries operate for a bare five days a week, and where you may wait for several days to see a doctor, or even a week to see a ‘your’ nominated doctor.

    At this time of the year our local surgery has waiting times in excess of three days, – why? – because most of the doctors are part-timers and at school holiday times they all have time off to have a vacation, whether it be Christmas, Easter or summer hols.

    I don’t call them lazy, because few actually are, but I feel they may perhaps have an incorrect sense of priorities, surely a position in the medical profession is one that shouldn’t be treated in quite the same way as hat of a counter clerk at Tesco’s.

    The chances of getting a male doctor are even slimmer, they seemingly also work part-time, spending the rest of the day working in the ‘private sector’. My male doctor is open for appointments for two hours on two days of the week, – just as well I’m a healthy lad.

    I read that Labour is decying the latest NHS changes as a ‘surreptitious privatisation’, – I always thought that GP’s were contractors to the NHS and not actually employees, – so doesn’t that make the NHS already substantially privatised?. Certainly the salary levels of GP’s would suggest that they are far too superior to be mere employees.

  5. David, I currently teach law and English to the equivalent of AS & A level students.

    I have 22 hours class time but with corrections, preperation, meetings, evaluations etc I typically work 50 – 60 hours a week like the lady above. This includes evening and weekend work and does not include extra curricular activities or holiday work.

    You should really do a bit of homework, (pun intended), before making ill informed accusations.

  6. Paul,

    With all of the ‘breaks’ in the scholastic year I doubt that a teachers annual hourly workload approaches the time that most full-time employees spend earning a living.

    That bureaucratic red tape consumes as much time as that spent in actual teaching is hardly surprising, as it does seem to be feature of latter day ‘public sector’ employment.

  7. With all of the ‘breaks’ in the scholastic year I doubt that a teachers annual hourly workload approaches the time that most full-time employees spend earning a living

    Then we disagree Ernest.

    That bureaucratic red tape consumes as much time as that spent in actual teaching is hardly surprising, as it does seem to be feature of latter day ‘public sector’ employment

    I work in a fee paying semi private school.

  8. Teaching is the strangest profession.

    At the same time, you have

    a) the most motivated people on the face of the earth, who are in it for the love of teaching and motivating and challenging their students who cohabit the school building

    b) lazy shirkers, scholars of the sick day rules who won’t do one thing not required.

    I’ve seen both.

    Guess which group the teacher’s union is most concerned with?

  9. Wev were all at school. Would any of us have wanted to be on the receiving end of us? I doubt it. For me, good teachers are a huge asset. When at secondary school, I had a good chemistry teacher in 3rd and 4th years, so I did extremely wel lbecause he made it interesting. In 5th year, I got an old duffer, got bored and grades collapsed into mediocrity. At that age, self-motivation is in short supply so the teacher makes the difference.

  10. “Guess which group the teacher’s union is most concerned with?”

    Phantom – that seems to be the case with all unions nowadays. They are a distortion of their original intention.

    One of the teachers unions in Ireland was complaining when the Govt proposed an initiative to root out bad teachers.

    http://www.newstalk.ie/Howlin-promises-to-flush-out-bad-teachers

  11. The unions in the UK and US devote maximum resources to protect the worst of their work force. The malingerer is king. Then they wonder why nobody respects unions anymore, and why union membership is way down.

    The Japanese and German unions don’t do this – they know that long term prosperity depends on everyone doing a good job every hour and every day. Lots of luck getting our unions to have that as a goal.

  12. Paul,

    You may well do, but the that doesn’t exempt you from the red-tape that others in your profession strongly advocate.

    You may well disagree with my comment on annual hourly workload, but then you would say that.

    How anyone who works for but two thirds of a year can compare, on an total hourly basis, with someone who works a full year with a months holiday, seems a trifle imaginative.

  13. You may well do, but the that doesn’t exempt you from the red-tape that others in your profession strongly advocate

    Oh no it doesn’t. I’m speaking about the automatic assumption that it’s a ‘public sector’ employment profession.

    How anyone who works for but two thirds of a year can compare, on an total hourly basis, with someone who works a full year with a months holiday, seems a trifle imaginative

    Well, unless you’ve experienced it you’ll have to continue imagining.

  14. Paul,

    Thank you, but I have experienced it. I have worked all my life and that includes a period of teaching a trade course at a polytechnic. Admittedly, for one afternoon and evening a week, but that was in addition to my full time 50 hours a week job, yes we used to work a six day week, ‘back then’.

    Yes, teenagers can be a pain, and the ones I was teaching were 16 year old, first year apprentices, who, out of a class of eight, two could barely write their own names, At first I found this almost unbelievable, yet it was so, and this was fifty years ago, when education still had a decent reputation.

    However, the experience did open my eyes, and sowed the seed of scepticism as to the dedication of the education system in general when sixteen year olds, with no obvious mental disability, still had a problem in legibly writing their own names.

    Being a father of three children of my own and a grandfather of six, I think I just may have rather more experience than you imagine.

  15. Thank you, but I have experienced it

    With all due respect Ernest you haven’t

    I have 22 hours class time but with corrections, preperation, meetings, evaluations etc I typically work 50 – 60 hours a week like the lady above. This includes evening and weekend work and does not include extra curricular activities or holiday work

    Your and my experiences of teaching are very different

    I think I just may have rather more experience than you imagine.

    I wouldn’t be so arrogant as to imagine any such thing Ernest. I’m merely contending that our experiences are vastly different, perhaps things have changed in fifty years?

  16. When I was in school during the 1980s and 1990s the most militant trade unionist who was always going on strike was also pretty much the worst teacher and was as thick as pigshit.

  17. A typical private sector worker works, on average, 38 hours and 54 minutes every week. Over the course of a year the average worker will work 233 days, with 104 days off due to weekends and an additional 28 days off due to leave. That puts the average number of hours worked in a year at 1,812. Even taking Paul’s lower estimate of a 50 hour week that puts the average number of hours worked per day at 10 hours. That puts the number of hours worked by a teacher at 1,900 hours, more than the average private sector worker.

  18. Paul,

    I very sure they have, – and certainly not for all the better!

  19. Seamus,

    How very selective you are when it comes to figures. The vast majority of full time private sector workers work quite a few hours more than the 39 hours per week that you quote, – although I am sure you are quoting a ‘reliable source’.

  20. The typical private sector worker doesn’t have the entire summer off, plus winter and spring breaks, as our teachers do, and perhaps yours.

  21. Ernest,

    I’m basing it off of figures from the Office for National Statistics.

    Phantom,

    That is taken into account. Even with the summer off, the breaks at half term etc, teachers still work more hours in a year than the average private sector worker.

  22. I have July & August off Phantom, eleven days at Easter and eleven days at Christmas. All my holidays involve differing degrees of working.

  23. If that is the average working week for private sector workers, then this country deserves everything that is coming its way. Truly a nation of part-timers, and many seemingly suffering delusions of ‘egalitarian inspired’ competence.

  24. Seamus

    Well I ain’t buyin’ that.

    Are they comparing full time employees only? Many in the private sector here work less than 40 hours because that’s all that’s available for them. If those stats include any part time workers, they’re skewed.

    All the hard charging white collar guys I know in NY and London work a lot more than 40 hours a week. And many of the blue collar workers would hope that they work 80 hours a week, because the additional 40 would be at overtime rates.

  25. The very long vacations are a remnant of an agricultural past, when the kids helped bring in the crops.

    The exceptionally short school years in the West were something that the Koreans and Japanese made sure not to copy.

    They’re pretty smart, the real Asians.

  26. They’re pretty smart, the real Asians

    Their dominance in the technology and manufacturing markets doesn’t really have any relevance to how many hours a teacher in Spain works does it?

  27. If the Spanish studied as hard as the Koreans did, they’d have their own Samsung maybe.

  28. If the Spanish studied as hard as the Koreans did, they’d have their own Samsung maybe

    Maybe but that’s a different argument.